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Anyone hear of a 120V clothes dryer?

Started by Rick C October 4, 2021
On 10/4/2021 7:20 AM, Rob wrote:
> Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote: >> On 10/4/2021 3:54 AM, Don Y wrote: >>> On 10/4/2021 3:31 AM, Don Y wrote: >>>> My "inexpensive" dryer costs about $12/year to operate (according >>>> to the gummit -- I suspect it costs us LESS as we're a small >>>> household and not "clothes hogs"). >>> >>> No, that can't be correct (dryer is 15 years old so the rating is >>> "dated"). I'll have to drag out our most recent electric bill to >>> see what we're paying (transportation costs, taxes, fees, etc.) >>> >>> I'm *sure* we spend more running computers than drying >>> clothes! >> >> Including all fees, transportation & generation costs, taxes, >> etc. we pay ~14c/KWHr. ($237/1661KWHr last month) Because we're >> big consumers, we pay more per KWHr (rate is graduated upwards with >> increased usage). > > Electricity is much more expensive here. 1661kWh that is what I > use in half a year. And according to my electricity company, I > am an above-average user (for my type of house and household).
We are likely considerably above average consumers. Air conditioning is March thru October. Refrigerator, freezer, electric stove, at home 24/7/365, lots of computers running, etc. We use the washing machine much more than the dryer; each load gets followed by a "short wash" (with no detergent... to act as an extra rinse cycle as the HE detergent bothers our skin). It leaves the items pretty well "wrung out". And, everything needs to get *washed* but doesn't need to get *dried*. None of my clothes (T-shirts and bluejeans) get dried -- hang the shirts out of the washing machine (easier than folding them and putting them in drawers) and they'll be dry before the next load clears the wash. Bluejeans seem to shrink -- even when not actively dried. So, I hang them to dry and then put them on just before they are completely dried (to stretch them back out to their intended size). A few minutes on a warm body and in 80-120F weather makes short order of drying them! "Dress clothes" are going to get ironed so why dry before ironing? And, those are only used for social events and formal gatherings. Towels and bedding get dried -- though towels only partially (drying completely seems to cause uneven shrinkage, distorting them from their normal rectangular shapes). Trying to get bedding completely dry would be wasteful -- there's always a damp area as the sheets inevitably are tangled in the drier. So, leave the sheet untangled on the bed for a while before making the bed. Underwear and socks are the only items of mine that are completely dried -- because that's really the only way to get them to a state where they can be transferred into a drawer (I'm not going to *hang* socks and briefs!) SWMBO does a load of undergarments plus a load of her clothes -- most of which get dried. But, our climate is such that we have no thick blankets, no heavy clothes, etc. so everything dries very quickly.
Ralph Mowery <rmowery42@charter.net> writes:
> Only if in a cooling mode. If in the heating mode, they do not.
With the singular exception of portable dehumidifiers, which are heat pumps but both sides are in the same box - the cooling side dries the air, and the heating side heats is back up. Net result including waste heat - warmer, drier, air. I'll add the pedantic note that the same amount of moisture in warmer air is a lower RELATIVE humidity (duh, if you think about it) so a pedant COULD claim that a heater makes the air "less humid" while not actually de-humidifying. To answer the original question - we had a 120v dryer in our first apartment; it was very small and took forever to dry anything. It was the first appliance against the wall when the revolution came.
On 10/4/2021 10:18 AM, bitrex wrote:
> On 10/4/2021 7:26 AM, Don Y wrote: >> On 10/4/2021 3:54 AM, Don Y wrote: >>> On 10/4/2021 3:31 AM, Don Y wrote: >>>> My "inexpensive" dryer costs about $12/year to operate (according >>>> to the gummit -- I suspect it costs us LESS as we're a small >>>> household and not "clothes hogs"). >>> >>> No, that can't be correct (dryer is 15 years old so the rating is >>> "dated"). I'll have to drag out our most recent electric bill to >>> see what we're paying (transportation costs, taxes, fees, etc.) >>> >>> I'm *sure* we spend more running computers than drying >>> clothes! >> >> Including all fees, transportation & generation costs, taxes, >> etc. we pay ~14c/KWHr. ($237/1661KWHr last month) Because we're >> big consumers, we pay more per KWHr (rate is graduated upwards with >> increased usage). >> >> Dryer is rated at 5400W. Assume it is operating at its rated >> power consumption (despite the fact that we don't dry things on >> high heat!). >> >> Three loads per week. Each load takes 20 minutes to dry >> (give or take a couple). So, figure a full hour at full >> power ... 5.4KWHr per week. So, 75c/wk. Laundry doesn't >> take holidays so $39/yr. >> >> *If* we dried at high heat! If, as most energy estimators >> assume, we were only drawing 3500W, derate that figure to >> $25/yr. >> >> $300 (neglecting euro:dollar conversion rate) is still 7.5 >> years payback (12 yrs if derated) -- neglecting cost of money. > > I live in a condo complex with several of these type of front-loading behemoths > on site: > > Three loads a week, yikes. I'd be pretty cranky doing laundry 3x a week. I do > one industrial-sized load a week, well worth the $2.25 in quarters for a wash & > dry.
You are likely one person? Laundry is just off the kitchen, here. No quarters. No special trips. No one poking through your unattended wash. You know when its "done" and can start the next load while you're cooking dinner, etc.
> Get more clothes and do less laundry!
On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 3:30:05 AM UTC-4, gnuarm.del...@gmail.com wrote:
> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? > > I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current.
The so-called "compacts" and the "stackables" are all 120V operation, for reasons of portability and plug and play use. The interior volume is about half that of the full-sized 240V jobs. As for the full size dryers, the heater is the only 240V load, everything else, motor, timer and whatnots are all 120V operation, so the transition is not extreme.
> > -- > > Rick C. > > - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging > - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:
> but it saves water and things get cleaner ..
Saving is not something US citizens seem to be concerned about...
On 10/4/2021 11:21 AM, Rob wrote:
> Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote: >> but it saves water and things get cleaner .. > > Saving is not something US citizens seem to be concerned about...
Sure! We save *money* (that 300 euros of which you spoke). Would you say europeans aren't concerned about saving (money)?
On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 1:54:25 PM UTC-4, DJ Delorie wrote:
> Ralph Mowery <rmow...@charter.net> writes: > > Only if in a cooling mode. If in the heating mode, they do not. > With the singular exception of portable dehumidifiers, which are heat > pumps but both sides are in the same box - the cooling side dries the > air, and the heating side heats is back up. Net result including waste > heat - warmer, drier, air.
Dehumidifiers are not heat pumps. They're more like air conditioners than anything else. Air is drawn through the 32o cooling coil to condense the moisture. From there it is blown through the condensor coil to bring it back up to its original temperature. This keeps net air temperature unchanged. Many of the central air/ heating systems have the same feature if selected by the user. They run the A/C for dehumidification and also the electtic backup heater to bring the air temperature back up to comfort levels. This is under thermostat control, and it only runs the backup heat this way when the air temperature is below the A/C setpoint.
> > I'll add the pedantic note that the same amount of moisture in warmer > air is a lower RELATIVE humidity (duh, if you think about it) so a > pedant COULD claim that a heater makes the air "less humid" while not > actually de-humidifying. > > To answer the original question - we had a 120v dryer in our first > apartment; it was very small and took forever to dry anything. It was > the first appliance against the wall when the revolution came.
Was gonna say, plan on 90 minute cycle times. That type of dryer is only for people who live in compact dwelling and have no alternative. Otherwise- no way.
On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 1:02:09 PM UTC-4, Ralph Mowery wrote:
> In article <ao4mlgdriq8jv5q01...@4ax.com>, > jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com says... > > > > A heat pump clothes dryer sounds over-the-top to me. One of those > > won't reduce global temperature by a picokelvin. And has refrigerent > > inside. > > > > > I always though the heat pump for small things was way over kill and > something else to go wrong. I have a heat pump for the house and it > works very well and inexpensive to operate. In the climite I live in the > HP is the way to go for most as the temperture is seldom over 100 deg F > and seldom below 20 deg F most of the time. Mostly in the 90 to 30 deg > range. I would not want one for the water heater or clothes dryer or > anything else that I can think of to produce heat.
Heat pump water heaters actually save a bundle.
mandag den 4. oktober 2021 kl. 20.41.14 UTC+2 skrev Fred Bloggs:
> On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 1:54:25 PM UTC-4, DJ Delorie wrote: > > Ralph Mowery <rmow...@charter.net> writes: > > > Only if in a cooling mode. If in the heating mode, they do not. > > With the singular exception of portable dehumidifiers, which are heat > > pumps but both sides are in the same box - the cooling side dries the > > air, and the heating side heats is back up. Net result including waste > > heat - warmer, drier, air. > Dehumidifiers are not heat pumps. They're more like air conditioners than anything else. Air is drawn through the 32o cooling coil to condense the moisture. From there it is blown through the condensor coil to bring it back up to its original temperature. This keeps net air temperature unchanged.
not possible, the energy used to drive the dehumidifier (+ whats gained from condensing water) has to go somewhere
On 2021/10/04 12:30 a.m., Rick C wrote:
> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? > > I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. >
26 of them at Home Depot: https://www.homedepot.com/b/Appliances-Washers-Dryers-Dryers-Electric-Dryers/120-volt/N-5yc1vZc3q1Z1z17ja4 John :-#(#