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Anyone hear of a 120V clothes dryer?

Started by Rick C October 4, 2021
 gnuarm.del...@gmail.com wrote:
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> > Energy used in clothes drying is not very much compared to heating the homes. > In fact, everything other than heating and cooling is pretty much in the noise for electric usage.
** Fridges and water heaters are the big consumers in homes - cos they are always running and being used.
> Even an EV is small in comparison unless you have a rather long commute.
** Absolute bullshit.
> think Win uses a 120V outlet to charge his hybrid and almost never uses gasoline.
** FFS a "hybrid" is a petrol engine car. ...... Phil
On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 4:01:14 PM UTC-4, Jasen Betts wrote:
> On 2021-10-04, Fred Bloggs <bloggs.fred...@gmail.com> wrote: > > On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 1:54:25 PM UTC-4, DJ Delorie wrote: > >> Ralph Mowery <rmow...@charter.net> writes: > >> > Only if in a cooling mode. If in the heating mode, they do not. > >> With the singular exception of portable dehumidifiers, which are heat > >> pumps but both sides are in the same box - the cooling side dries the > >> air, and the heating side heats is back up. Net result including waste > >> heat - warmer, drier, air. > > > > Dehumidifiers are not heat pumps. They're more like air conditioners > > than anything else. Air is drawn through the 32o cooling coil to > > condense the moisture. From there it is blown through the condensor > > coil to bring it back up to its original temperature. This keeps net > > air temperature unchanged. > That is obviously false, you gain the latent heat of condensation and > also the heat from all the ineficiencies of the machine.
The heat of condensation is returned to the (cooled) air stream. It is not gained. Unless you care to explain how returning heat you just removed from the air creates a runaway effect. The heat from machine inefficiency is a small fraction of the heat exchange with the humid air.
> > Anyway I think the question was about heat-pump clothes dryers (where > you don;'t gain condensation heat because the water was evaporated > from the clothes) > > -- > Jasen.
On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 3:49:37 PM UTC-4, DJ Delorie wrote:
> Fred Bloggs <bloggs.fred...@gmail.com> writes: > > Dehumidifiers are not heat pumps. They're more like air conditioners > > than anything else. > Depends on how pedantly you define "heat pump." It's pumping heat, just > like air conditioners, refrigerators, minisplits, and everything else > that uses phase change thermal transfer systems. > > But if you define "heat pump" as "that, but reversible"... yeah, most of > those things are not heat pumps. > > This keeps net air temperature unchanged. > My warm basement disagrees with you. All the power used to *run* the > dehumidifier causes heat, which is included in the airflow, so the > outgoing air is warmer than the incoming air. Not by much, but it is.
Of course it is. If your basement is getting warm, you don't have enough ventilation. I assume you're talking about cooling season, so you might consider running an A/C instead of dehumidifier.
On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 11:58:26 AM UTC-4, terrell....@gmail.com wrote:
> On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 6:21:53 AM UTC-4, palli...@gmail.com wrote: > > Sylvia Else wrote: > > ============== > > > > > > > Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping > > > > instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so > > > > they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. > > > > > > They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. > > > > > ** Plenty to be found in Australia too. > > Big advantage in premises with limited electric power available. > > Ordinary clothes driers push single phase ccts to their limit. > > > > > > > > ...... Phil > My electric service is 100A at 240VAC, center tapped which is considered small. 200A is becoming the newer stadard where home have Central Air Conditioning. A typical dryer is on a 20A circuit My heat pump with heat strips has two 30A 240 volt breakers.
All the dryers I've seen are on a 30 amp circuit, NEMA 10-30 used to be the standard connector, but it has no safety ground, just neutral. They are deprecated, but still lots of them in use. I believe the newer standard connector is the NEMA 14&#8209;30. One web site I read says the NEMA code requires a 30 amp circuit for dryers. -- Rick C. +- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging +- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 11:03:05 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
> On Mon, 4 Oct 2021 03:21:50 -0700 (PDT), Phil Allison > <palli...@gmail.com> wrote: > > > Sylvia Else wrote: > >============== > > > > >> > Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping > >> > instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so > >> > they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. > >> > >> They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. > >> > > > >** Plenty to be found in Australia too. > > Big advantage in premises with limited electric power available. > > Ordinary clothes driers push single phase ccts to their limit. > > > > > > > >...... Phil > > > > > Wouldn't a lower power dryer just run longer? > > The ultimate low power clothes dryer might not have a heater at all. > Just a fan and the tumble drum. I wonder how well that would work. > > Do the heat pumps also de-humidify?
They should. Run the exhaust over the cold coils improving the efficiency and removing the moisture from the exhaust air at the same time. That's a win in the humid summer, but in the winter I switch my dryer exhaust to retain both the heat and the humidity. I wonder if building codes allow a dehumidifier dryer to be installed without an outside exhaust? -- Rick C. ++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging ++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 gnuarm.del...@gmail.com wrote:
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> > > > > ** Plenty to be found in Australia too. > > > Big advantage in premises with limited electric power available. > > > Ordinary clothes driers push single phase ccts to their limit. > > > > > > My electric service is 100A at 240VAC, center tapped which is considered small.
** In the 15 unit block where I live, that much capacity covers 5 units. IOW we have 100A, 240V three phase coming in from the street. So each unit has one 16A power circuit and one 8A lighting circuit. How so ? Hot water and stoves all run on gas. The "shit hits the fan" if someone adds a clothes drier. ...... Phil
On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 12:05:04 PM UTC-4, Rich wrote:
> Rick C <gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote: > > The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on > > an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? > Yes, on all natural gas or propane powered clothes dryers. Is the > dryer also connected to a natural gas supply or propane tank? > > For a "gas" powered dryer, the heat is obtained from burning the fuel, > so the dryer only needs a standard 120v cord to run the timer > controller and the drum spin/air blower motor.
I didn't think of that. Perhaps it is connected to gas. The stove is gas. I've assumed they are propane, but I haven't looked for a tank in any of the homes I've stayed in. The one apartment I've been in had an electric stove. I will check when I get a chance. They tend not to heat water in a water tank like we do here. I've seen solar hot water and instant hot water heaters on the showers. Never on the sinks other than the apartment which probably does have a tank somewhere. In the current house I was thinking they had a hot water heater because the water was always hot enough... until I took a shower at 2 am when the water was barely hotter than the cold (where "cold" is in name only). So it must be solar hot water and cooled off pretty good at night. So no hot showers when you first get up! They don't seem to insulate the hot water tanks on the roofs. They look like 50 gal drums which is probably what they are. A panel perhaps 4'x4' to 6'x6' is what they put on them to collect the heat. I haven't seen it rain for more than two days in a row yet. I think even the hurricanes pass through as fast as that. They just make more of an impression than a simple rain storm. There are still signs of Maria, but you might not realize that's what they are if you aren't told. I did see one large building in a rural area shaped like a huge A frame. Much of the sheet metal was missing and I suppose will not be repaired at this point. It's in a farming area, so probably not much incentive to take it down either. -- Rick C. --- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging --- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 12:06:09 PM UTC-4, terrell....@gmail.com wrote:
> On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 3:30:05 AM UTC-4, gnuarm.del...@gmail.com wrote: > > The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? > > > > I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. > > > > -- > > > Yes there are 120 volt dryers. they sit on top of the matching washer. They are made for older apartments or mobile homes. Lowe's and Home Depot both carried them.
This is two units stacked, rather than a one piece washer/dryer. Kenmore I believe. I saw a closed Sears/Kmart the other day near Luquillo. So far that's the area I like the most, but I'm still looking, exploring. I'm in Guayama at the moment. They have a very nice plaza in town. Virtually every town has a central plaza with at least one church, the town hall and other buildings of prominence. This one is large with both concrete and grass with many interesting trees. They have what look like vines, but they seem to meld into the trees up in the branches, so maybe some sort of extra roots? Remind me of being in a cypress swamp. -- Rick C. --+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging --+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 1:02:09 PM UTC-4, Ralph Mowery wrote:
> In article <ao4mlgdriq8jv5q01...@4ax.com>, > jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com says... > > > > A heat pump clothes dryer sounds over-the-top to me. One of those > > won't reduce global temperature by a picokelvin. And has refrigerent > > inside. > > > > > I always though the heat pump for small things was way over kill and > something else to go wrong. I have a heat pump for the house and it > works very well and inexpensive to operate. In the climite I live in the > HP is the way to go for most as the temperture is seldom over 100 deg F > and seldom below 20 deg F most of the time. Mostly in the 90 to 30 deg > range. I would not want one for the water heater or clothes dryer or > anything else that I can think of to produce heat.
Heat pumps are also used in hot water heaters. As long as the pay back of the extra cost is significantly shorter than the life time, it seems worth while. I had to think about the result when used in a home without an outside connection, but every way you look at it the heat pump beats straight electric heat. -- Rick C. -+- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging -+- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 1:33:34 PM UTC-4, lang...@fonz.dk wrote:
> mandag den 4. oktober 2021 kl. 19.27.55 UTC+2 skrev bitrex: > > On 10/4/2021 4:55 AM, Sylvia Else wrote: > > > On 04-Oct-21 7:27 pm, Rob wrote: > > >> Rick C <gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote: > > >>> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on > > >>> an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? > > >>> > > >>> I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a > > >>> standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 > > >>> degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. > > >> > > >> Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping > > >> instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so > > >> they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. > > > > > > They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. > > > > > > Sylvia. > > They make these portable dishwashers also, you can wash literally about > > 5 dishes in them: > > > > <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttYboBVP0EE> > > > > I'm not so un-ameniable to "women's work" that I can't hand-wash 5 > > dishes and some knives and forks. Loading and programming the machine > > probably takes longer, anyway. > but it saves water and things get cleaner ..
It saves how much water...? You can only save what is being used by hand washing which isn't much for five plates and some silver. If hand washing gets them clean, how can the washer get them "cleaner"? Is this like a volume control that goes to 11? -- Rick C. -++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging -++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209