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Anyone hear of a 120V clothes dryer?

Started by Rick C October 4, 2021
On 10/4/2021 3:31 AM, Don Y wrote:
> My "inexpensive" dryer costs about $12/year to operate (according > to the gummit -- I suspect it costs us LESS as we're a small > household and not "clothes hogs").
No, that can't be correct (dryer is 15 years old so the rating is "dated"). I'll have to drag out our most recent electric bill to see what we're paying (transportation costs, taxes, fees, etc.) I'm *sure* we spend more running computers than drying clothes!
Rob <nomail@example.com> wrote in
news:slrnsllio0.57u.nomail@xs9.xs4all.nl: 

> Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid> wrote: >> On 04-Oct-21 7:27 pm, Rob wrote: >>> Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote: >>>> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's >>>> also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that >>>> before? >>>> >>>> I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size >>>> as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned >>>> 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. >>> >>> Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping >>> instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power >>> so they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. >> >> They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound >> economic. >> >> Sylvia. > > They cost like 300 euro more, which we save on electricity costs > in about 4 years. > > Not a stunning economic difference, but you know what? In Europe > we do consider the environment, and are not only watching pennies > as a decisiion criterium when buying energy wasting equipment. > > Maybe in the US you should start doing that too! >
We do and have for decades. We call them Clothes lines.
On 10/4/2021 3:54 AM, Don Y wrote:
> On 10/4/2021 3:31 AM, Don Y wrote: >> My "inexpensive" dryer costs about $12/year to operate (according >> to the gummit -- I suspect it costs us LESS as we're a small >> household and not "clothes hogs"). > > No, that can't be correct (dryer is 15 years old so the rating is > "dated"). I'll have to drag out our most recent electric bill to > see what we're paying (transportation costs, taxes, fees, etc.) > > I'm *sure* we spend more running computers than drying > clothes!
Including all fees, transportation & generation costs, taxes, etc. we pay ~14c/KWHr. ($237/1661KWHr last month) Because we're big consumers, we pay more per KWHr (rate is graduated upwards with increased usage). Dryer is rated at 5400W. Assume it is operating at its rated power consumption (despite the fact that we don't dry things on high heat!). Three loads per week. Each load takes 20 minutes to dry (give or take a couple). So, figure a full hour at full power ... 5.4KWHr per week. So, 75c/wk. Laundry doesn't take holidays so $39/yr. *If* we dried at high heat! If, as most energy estimators assume, we were only drawing 3500W, derate that figure to $25/yr. $300 (neglecting euro:dollar conversion rate) is still 7.5 years payback (12 yrs if derated) -- neglecting cost of money.
On 04/10/2021 11:17, Tabby wrote:
> On Monday, 4 October 2021 at 10:36:08 UTC+1, Rob wrote: >> Sylvia Else <syl...@email.invalid> wrote: >>> On 04-Oct-21 7:27 pm, Rob wrote: >>>> Rick C <gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote: >>>>> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? >>>>> >>>>> I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. >>>> >>>> Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping >>>> instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so >>>> they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. >>> >>> They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. >>> >>> Sylvia. >> They cost like 300 euro more, which we save on electricity costs in >> about 4 years. >> >> Not a stunning economic difference, but you know what? In Europe we >> do consider the environment, and are not only watching pennies as >> a decisiion criterium when buying energy wasting equipment. >> >> Maybe in the US you should start doing that too! > > Heat pump machines are an improvement. More sensible is just a fan, dries things overnight, costs far less to buy & run, consumes no space. >
Just hang the clothes on the back of the freezer. Make your own heat pump by filling the freezer with bottles of water and periodically putting them outside to thaw. -- Cheers Clive
On 10/4/2021 4:35 AM, Clive Arthur wrote:
> Just hang the clothes on the back of the freezer. Make your own heat pump by > filling the freezer with bottles of water and periodically putting them outside > to thaw.
Or, outdoors as we did growing up. [At school (campus-wide steam heating plant), we had these large vertical drawers that you'd slide out of this huge assembly; you could drape a bedsheet unimpeded and have it dried in a matter of minutes!] Doesn't work well, here, as there is often a lot of dust in the air. And, when not, then plant-sourced allergens. Who the hell wants to wrap themselves in pollen-laden clothing? [OTOH, the air *does* smell particularly fragrant! Unless there's a wildfire within a few hundred miles!]
 Don Y wrote:
===========
> > > Dryer is rated at 5400W. Assume it is operating at its rated > power consumption (despite the fact that we don't dry things on > high heat!). > > Three loads per week. Each load takes 20 minutes to dry > (give or take a couple).
** We = how many ? That 3 loads a week figure is barely enough for one. ....... Phil
Tabby <tabbypurr@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Monday, 4 October 2021 at 10:36:08 UTC+1, Rob wrote: >> Sylvia Else <syl...@email.invalid> wrote: >> > On 04-Oct-21 7:27 pm, Rob wrote: >> >> Rick C <gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote: >> >>> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? >> >>> >> >>> I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. >> >> >> >> Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping >> >> instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so >> >> they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. >> > >> > They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. >> > >> > Sylvia. >> They cost like 300 euro more, which we save on electricity costs in >> about 4 years. >> >> Not a stunning economic difference, but you know what? In Europe we >> do consider the environment, and are not only watching pennies as >> a decisiion criterium when buying energy wasting equipment. >> >> Maybe in the US you should start doing that too! > > Heat pump machines are an improvement. More sensible is just a fan, dries things overnight, costs far less to buy & run, consumes no space.
I don't have a dryer myself. I have a washing machine that spins at 1400 RPM and I hang the clothes on a line in the spare room. Dry in a couple of hours, at most half a day when it is raining outside. But I am depicting the situation with dryers as it is here.
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org <DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org> wrote:
> Rob <nomail@example.com> wrote in > news:slrnsllio0.57u.nomail@xs9.xs4all.nl: > >> Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid> wrote: >>> On 04-Oct-21 7:27 pm, Rob wrote: >>>> Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote: >>>>> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's >>>>> also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that >>>>> before? >>>>> >>>>> I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size >>>>> as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned >>>>> 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. >>>> >>>> Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping >>>> instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power >>>> so they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. >>> >>> They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound >>> economic. >>> >>> Sylvia. >> >> They cost like 300 euro more, which we save on electricity costs >> in about 4 years. >> >> Not a stunning economic difference, but you know what? In Europe >> we do consider the environment, and are not only watching pennies >> as a decisiion criterium when buying energy wasting equipment. >> >> Maybe in the US you should start doing that too! >> > > We do and have for decades. We call them Clothes lines.
Yes that is what I am using as well, I only depicted what a dryer would be here. They are used by people with limited indoor space, or maybe lazy people who don't like to hang the clothes on a line one by one.
Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:
> On 10/4/2021 3:54 AM, Don Y wrote: >> On 10/4/2021 3:31 AM, Don Y wrote: >>> My "inexpensive" dryer costs about $12/year to operate (according >>> to the gummit -- I suspect it costs us LESS as we're a small >>> household and not "clothes hogs"). >> >> No, that can't be correct (dryer is 15 years old so the rating is >> "dated"). I'll have to drag out our most recent electric bill to >> see what we're paying (transportation costs, taxes, fees, etc.) >> >> I'm *sure* we spend more running computers than drying >> clothes! > > Including all fees, transportation & generation costs, taxes, > etc. we pay ~14c/KWHr. ($237/1661KWHr last month) Because we're > big consumers, we pay more per KWHr (rate is graduated upwards with > increased usage).
Electricity is much more expensive here. 1661kWh that is what I use in half a year. And according to my electricity company, I am an above-average user (for my type of house and household).
On Mon, 4 Oct 2021 03:53:40 -0700 (PDT), Phil Allison
<pallison49@gmail.com> wrote:

> Don Yobbo wrote: >=============== >> >> > Maybe in the US you should start doing that too! >> >> My "inexpensive" dryer costs about $12/year to operate (according >> to the gummit -- I suspect it costs us LESS as we're a small >> household and not "clothes hogs"). > >** So you use a fan ? > > Cos any electric real drier would cost 20 times that to run over a year. > > >..... Phil
That $12 is in the ballpark of what we'd pay if we used a electric dryer, or maybe a bit low based on California electric rates. But we use gas for the heat and the small electric motor just tumbles the drum. A clothes dryer is far more convenient than a clothesline or a fan, and de-wrinkles stuff. A heat pump clothes dryer sounds over-the-top to me. One of those won't reduce global temperature by a picokelvin. And has refrigerent inside. To Save The Earth, shower and wash your clothes less often. Eat more raw veggies that you grow yourself. -- Father Brown's figure remained quite dark and still; but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was always most valuable when he had lost it.