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Anyone hear of a 120V clothes dryer?

Started by Rick C October 4, 2021
On Mon, 4 Oct 2021 11:17:16 -0000 (UTC),
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:

>Rob <nomail@example.com> wrote in >news:slrnsllio0.57u.nomail@xs9.xs4all.nl: > >> Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid> wrote: >>> On 04-Oct-21 7:27 pm, Rob wrote: >>>> Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote: >>>>> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's >>>>> also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that >>>>> before? >>>>> >>>>> I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size >>>>> as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned >>>>> 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. >>>> >>>> Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping >>>> instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power >>>> so they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. >>> >>> They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound >>> economic. >>> >>> Sylvia. >> >> They cost like 300 euro more, which we save on electricity costs >> in about 4 years. >> >> Not a stunning economic difference, but you know what? In Europe >> we do consider the environment, and are not only watching pennies >> as a decisiion criterium when buying energy wasting equipment. >> >> Maybe in the US you should start doing that too! >> > >We do and have for decades. We call them Clothes lines.
Some places have sudden rain showers, which can be a nuisance. Women used to be always-available housewives and could watch out for the clothes on the line. Not so much today. My gram in New Orleans would shriek and run out to collect the wash at the first drops. They would take essentially forever to dry in the winter, at 90% humidity, and would often come off the line smelling sour and musty. She had 8 kids and cooked over a wood stove. No time for college or a career. -- Father Brown's figure remained quite dark and still; but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was always most valuable when he had lost it.
On Mon, 4 Oct 2021 03:21:50 -0700 (PDT), Phil Allison
<pallison49@gmail.com> wrote:

> Sylvia Else wrote: >============== > > >> > Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping >> > instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so >> > they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. >> >> They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. >> > >** Plenty to be found in Australia too. > Big advantage in premises with limited electric power available. > Ordinary clothes driers push single phase ccts to their limit. > > > >...... Phil > >
Wouldn't a lower power dryer just run longer? The ultimate low power clothes dryer might not have a heater at all. Just a fan and the tumble drum. I wonder how well that would work. Do the heat pumps also de-humidify? -- Father Brown's figure remained quite dark and still; but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was always most valuable when he had lost it.
On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 6:21:53 AM UTC-4, palli...@gmail.com wrote:
> Sylvia Else wrote: > ============== > > > > > Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping > > > instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so > > > they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. > > > > They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. > > > ** Plenty to be found in Australia too. > Big advantage in premises with limited electric power available. > Ordinary clothes driers push single phase ccts to their limit. > > > > ...... Phil
My electric service is 100A at 240VAC, center tapped which is considered small. 200A is becoming the newer stadard where home have Central Air Conditioning. A typical dryer is on a 20A circuit My heat pump with heat strips has two 30A 240 volt breakers.
Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote:
> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on > an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before?
Yes, on all natural gas or propane powered clothes dryers. Is the dryer also connected to a natural gas supply or propane tank? For a "gas" powered dryer, the heat is obtained from burning the fuel, so the dryer only needs a standard 120v cord to run the timer controller and the drum spin/air blower motor.
On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 3:30:05 AM UTC-4, gnuarm.del...@gmail.com wrote:
> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? > > I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. > > -- >
Yes there are 120 volt dryers. they sit on top of the matching washer. They are made for older apartments or mobile homes. Lowe's and Home Depot both carried them.
In article <ao4mlgdriq8jv5q01kcvp58o42g7vt426m@4ax.com>, 
jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com says...
> > A heat pump clothes dryer sounds over-the-top to me. One of those > won't reduce global temperature by a picokelvin. And has refrigerent > inside. > >
I always though the heat pump for small things was way over kill and something else to go wrong. I have a heat pump for the house and it works very well and inexpensive to operate. In the climite I live in the HP is the way to go for most as the temperture is seldom over 100 deg F and seldom below 20 deg F most of the time. Mostly in the 90 to 30 deg range. I would not want one for the water heater or clothes dryer or anything else that I can think of to produce heat.
In article <in5mlgdtkmtcpjrqjsmf8vr3tbukhk15ks@4ax.com>, 
jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com says...
> > Do the heat pumps also de-humidify? > > > > >
Only if in a cooling mode. If in the heating mode, they do not.
On 10/4/2021 7:26 AM, Don Y wrote:
> On 10/4/2021 3:54 AM, Don Y wrote: >> On 10/4/2021 3:31 AM, Don Y wrote: >>> My "inexpensive" dryer costs about $12/year to operate (according >>> to the gummit -- I suspect it costs us LESS as we're a small >>> household and not "clothes hogs"). >> >> No, that can't be correct (dryer is 15 years old so the rating is >> "dated").&nbsp; I'll have to drag out our most recent electric bill to >> see what we're paying (transportation costs, taxes, fees, etc.) >> >> I'm *sure* we spend more running computers than drying >> clothes! > > Including all fees, transportation & generation costs, taxes, > etc. we pay ~14c/KWHr.&nbsp; ($237/1661KWHr last month)&nbsp; Because we're > big consumers, we pay more per KWHr (rate is graduated upwards with > increased usage). > > Dryer is rated at 5400W.&nbsp; Assume it is operating at its rated > power consumption (despite the fact that we don't dry things on > high heat!). > > Three loads per week.&nbsp; Each load takes 20 minutes to dry > (give or take a couple).&nbsp; So, figure a full hour at full > power ... 5.4KWHr per week.&nbsp; So, 75c/wk.&nbsp; Laundry doesn't > take holidays so $39/yr. > > *If* we dried at high heat!&nbsp; If, as most energy estimators > assume, we were only drawing 3500W, derate that figure to > $25/yr. > > $300 (neglecting euro:dollar conversion rate) is still 7.5 > years payback (12 yrs if derated) -- neglecting cost of money.
I live in a condo complex with several of these type of front-loading behemoths on site: <https://lowlaundry.com/used-washer-l-o-w-certified-used-equipment-speed-queen-e10527.html?gclid=CjwKCAjwzOqKBhAWEiwArQGwaH4blkyBpxUvry5BJCJdKFeOjV2lE0Sn3aiCJdanG2sMNetLsP_y8xoCjVwQAvD_BwE> Three loads a week, yikes. I'd be pretty cranky doing laundry 3x a week. I do one industrial-sized load a week, well worth the $2.25 in quarters for a wash & dry. Get more clothes and do less laundry!
On 10/4/2021 4:55 AM, Sylvia Else wrote:
> On 04-Oct-21 7:27 pm, Rob wrote: >> Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote: >>> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet.&nbsp; It's also on >>> an extension cord.&nbsp; Anyone see anything like that before? >>> >>> I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a >>> standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 >>> degrees.&nbsp; Still, those aren't very high current. >> >> Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping >> instead of electric heating.&nbsp; They use like 700-1000W of power so >> they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. > > They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. > > Sylvia.
They make these portable dishwashers also, you can wash literally about 5 dishes in them: <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttYboBVP0EE> I'm not so un-ameniable to "women's work" that I can't hand-wash 5 dishes and some knives and forks. Loading and programming the machine probably takes longer, anyway.
mandag den 4. oktober 2021 kl. 19.27.55 UTC+2 skrev bitrex:
> On 10/4/2021 4:55 AM, Sylvia Else wrote: > > On 04-Oct-21 7:27 pm, Rob wrote: > >> Rick C <gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote: > >>> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on > >>> an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? > >>> > >>> I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a > >>> standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 > >>> degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. > >> > >> Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping > >> instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so > >> they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. > > > > They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. > > > > Sylvia. > They make these portable dishwashers also, you can wash literally about > 5 dishes in them: > > <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttYboBVP0EE> > > I'm not so un-ameniable to "women's work" that I can't hand-wash 5 > dishes and some knives and forks. Loading and programming the machine > probably takes longer, anyway.
but it saves water and things get cleaner ..