Forums

Magamp oscillator

Started by Piotr Wyderski November 3, 2015
Is it at all possible to build an oscillator entirely from
non-linear magnetics (OK, solid state diodes are allowed)?

	Best regards, Piotr
On a sunny day (Tue, 3 Nov 2015 11:45:33 +0100) it happened Piotr Wyderski
<peter.pan@neverland.mil> wrote in <n1a38d$sbh$3@node1.news.atman.pl>:

>Is it at all possible to build an oscillator entirely from >non-linear magnetics (OK, solid state diodes are allowed)? > > Best regards, Piotr
Transductors.. have gain, so why not? Solid state diode -> tunnel diode, not much else needed.
On Tue, 3 Nov 2015 11:45:33 +0100, Piotr Wyderski
<peter.pan@neverland.mil> wrote:

>Is it at all possible to build an oscillator entirely from >non-linear magnetics (OK, solid state diodes are allowed)? > > Best regards, Piotr
Magnetic amplifiers are conventionally effective in an AC environment - the power source is already 'oscillating'. Such a circuit can be made to be unstable to oscillate around the original conditions. With a DC supply, you'd need the initial transient application of power to 'start' the circuit, which, from a theoretical point of view, is cheating. If forced to stop cold, it would not restart oscillation without temporary removal or reapplication of power. The suggestion of a tunnel diode is one that introduces an external 'starting' oscillator. Remove the magnetics and it will still oscillate. There may be other ways to externally induce a magnetic circuit to oscillate from a static DC condition. In some environments this might be satisfactory. RL
legg wrote:

> Magnetic amplifiers are conventionally effective in an AC environment > - the power source is already 'oscillating'.
Hence my question, whether it would be possible to build an all-magnetic circuit. Best regards, Piotr
On Tuesday, 3 November 2015 14:31:10 UTC, Piotr Wyderski  wrote:
> legg wrote:
> > Magnetic amplifiers are conventionally effective in an AC environment > > - the power source is already 'oscillating'. > > Hence my question, whether it would be possible to build an all-magnetic > circuit. > > Best regards, Piotr
so derive your ac with a spinning magnet/coil. NT
tabbypurr@gmail.com wrote:

> so derive your ac with a spinning magnet/coil.
Yes, an Alexanderson alternator would be an option. :-) But how about a circuit without any moving parts. Doable? Best regards, Piotr
On Tue, 3 Nov 2015 15:53:56 +0100, Piotr Wyderski
<peter.pan@neverland.mil> wrote:

>tabbypurr@gmail.com wrote: > >> so derive your ac with a spinning magnet/coil. > >Yes, an Alexanderson alternator would be an option. :-) >But how about a circuit without any moving parts. Doable? > > Best regards, Piotr >
If you mean a DC powered circuit that oscillates using only passive parts and diodes, no relays or such, I've never seen it done. Except tunnel or some other negative-resistance diode.
John Larkin wrote:

> If you mean a DC powered circuit that oscillates using only passive > parts and diodes, no relays or such, I've never seen it done.
I'm not sure if you can call a magnetic amplifier a passive part. It can exhibit admirable power gain, but needs to be powered by AC, for example: http://sparkbangbuzz.com/mag-audio-amp/mag-audio-amp.htm The guy claims it has the gain of 2000. So recently, I have started to wonder if you can use such a device as a DC-powered oscillator. I agree, the answer "yes" would be a surprise, but maybe it is "yes" indeed? Best regards, Piotr
On a sunny day (Tue, 3 Nov 2015 15:31:04 +0100) it happened Piotr Wyderski
<peter.pan@neverland.mil> wrote in <n1agf9$dki$1@node1.news.atman.pl>:

>legg wrote: > >> Magnetic amplifiers are conventionally effective in an AC environment >> - the power source is already 'oscillating'. > >Hence my question, whether it would be possible to build an all-magnetic >circuit.
DC motor... :-)
Jan Panteltje wrote:

> DC motor...
And, in fact, it is a correct answer. Yes, it can be done that way. Now try without movables or argue it's impossible. :-) Best regards, Piotr