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Using mobile phone as an internet radio

Started by jim stone October 2, 2012
"Graham."

> > An incandescent light bulb is a good example, If it lasts 1000 hours > when run continuously, its life will be considerably shorter if run > (say) 4 hours a day and the time it is on added up.
** Where ever did you get that nonsense from ?? Some web forum ?
"Phil Allison" <phil_a@tpg.com.au> wrote in message 
news:ad1bkkF7pm9U1@mid.individual.net...
> > "Graham." > >> >> An incandescent light bulb is a good example, If it lasts 1000 hours >> when run continuously, its life will be considerably shorter if run >> (say) 4 hours a day and the time it is on added up. > > > ** Where ever did you get that nonsense from ?? > > Some web forum ?
I believe turning the bulbs on and off can induce thermal shock which causes premature failure. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_shock See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermionic_valves "The common wisdom was that valves&#2013266071;which, like light bulbs, contained a hot glowing filament&#2013266071;could never be used satisfactorily in large numbers, for they were unreliable, and in a large installation too many would fail in too short a time".[13] Tommy Flowers, who later designed Colossus, "discovered that, so long as valves were switched on and left on, they could operate reliably for very long periods, especially if their 'heaters' were run on a reduced current".
"David Woolley" <david@ex.djwhome.demon.invalid> wrote in message
news:k4fq2r$ics$1@dont-email.me...
> William Sommerwerck wrote:
>> My new computer has a solid-state "hard disk", and you >> wouldn't believe how fast it boots up, or how fast programs >> start to run.
> These, if flash memory, do have a definite wear out mechanism, > although they do try to avoid writing to the same spot, even if the > software does, to mitigate this.
Correct. SSDs are an exception. They contain "leveling" software that makes sure the disk is written to evenly. The Crucial disk I use is spec'd at about 40TB of total writes.
"JoRob64"
> "Phil Allison" >> "Graham." >> >>> >>> An incandescent light bulb is a good example, If it lasts 1000 hours >>> when run continuously, its life will be considerably shorter if run >>> (say) 4 hours a day and the time it is on added up. >> >> >> ** Where ever did you get that nonsense from ?? >> >> Some web forum ? > > I believe turning the bulbs on and off can induce thermal shock which > causes premature failure.
** Bollocks it does. There are many applications where incandescent lamps are turned on and off constantly and their life span is the same. The OP's hypothetical example ( don't ya just LOVE them) is typical of domestic lamp use. Fuckwit. .... Phil

Phil Allison wrote:
> "JoRob64" >> "Phil Allison" >>> "Graham." >>> >>>> >>>> An incandescent light bulb is a good example, If it lasts 1000 >>>> hours when run continuously, its life will be considerably shorter >>>> if run (say) 4 hours a day and the time it is on added up. >>> >>> >>> ** Where ever did you get that nonsense from ?? >>> >>> Some web forum ? >> >> I believe turning the bulbs on and off can induce thermal shock which >> causes premature failure. > > > ** Bollocks it does. > > There are many applications where incandescent lamps are turned on > and off constantly and their life span is the same. > > The OP's hypothetical example ( don't ya just LOVE them) is typical of > domestic lamp use. > > Fuckwit. > > > .... Phil
No Phil, that is not correct. If he only listens to Rap , its lifespan will be shortend greatly. Buffalo
On 10/2/2012 9:11 PM, Buffalo wrote:
> Phil Allison wrote: >> "JoRob64" >>> "Phil Allison" >>>> "Graham." >>>> >>>>> >>>>> An incandescent light bulb is a good example, If it lasts 1000 >>>>> hours when run continuously, its life will be considerably shorter >>>>> if run (say) 4 hours a day and the time it is on added up. >>>> >>>> >>>> ** Where ever did you get that nonsense from ?? >>>> >>>> Some web forum ? >>> >>> I believe turning the bulbs on and off can induce thermal shock which >>> causes premature failure. >> >> >> ** Bollocks it does. >> >> There are many applications where incandescent lamps are turned on >> and off constantly and their life span is the same. >> >> The OP's hypothetical example ( don't ya just LOVE them) is typical of >> domestic lamp use. >> >> Fuckwit. >> >> >> .... Phil > > No Phil, that is not correct. If he only listens to Rap , its lifespan will > be shortend greatly. > Buffalo > >
You shit for brains your ignorance is truly amazing. You are an undercover racist idiot. Go to the Republican side, because you are not fit to be a Democrat. After Obama wins, Zimmerman will be dealt with next.
On Oct 2, 6:28=A0pm, "Phil Allison" <phi...@tpg.com.au> wrote:
> "Graham." > > > > > An incandescent light bulb is a good example, If it lasts 1000 hours > > when run continuously, its life will be considerably shorter if run > > (say) 4 hours a day and the time it is on added up. > > ** Where ever did you get that nonsense from ?? > > =A0 =A0 =A0Some web forum ?
He is right, the stresses involved in the turn-on of the bulb each time is equal to several hours of continuous running. If you cycle a bulb on and off every few seconds, the total on time before the bulb fails will be only a few hundered hours for a 1000 hour rated bulb,
On Wed, 3 Oct 2012 09:28:13 +1000, "Phil Allison" <phil_a@tpg.com.au>
wrote:

>"Graham."
>> An incandescent light bulb is a good example, If it lasts 1000 hours >> when run continuously, its life will be considerably shorter if run >> (say) 4 hours a day and the time it is on added up. > >** Where ever did you get that nonsense from ??
It's not nonsense. The inrush current of a cold filament can shorten the filament life. That's why light bulbs usually blow up when you turn them on, not while they're running. The induced magnetic field also tends to "twang" the filament, which can break the filament if it were somehow mechanically weakened. While attending kollege in the 1960's, I worked for a short time as a non-union projectionist at a movie theater. Besides babysitting the projectors, I had to deal with the flashing light bulb marquee. I vaguely recall that there were something like 2000 40 watt light bulbs. Roughly once per week, my job was to replace the blown bulbs from a rickety pre-OSHA 20ft wooden ladder, sometimes at night. I didn't keep count, but every week, we would lose about 20 light bulbs. Doing the math, that means after about 2 years, ALL the light bulbs would have been replaced at least once. At 8 hrs run per day, that's 800 hrs lifetime which isn't all that great, especially since we were running the bulbs at reduced voltage to improve the lifetime. We used the same bulbs in the theater foyer and lobby, where they were NOT cycled on and off like the flashing marquee. I rarely replaced those bulbs and they seemed to last forever.
> Some web forum ?
If you repeat something often enough, it eventually becomes dogma. -- Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
"Tom Biasi" <tombiasi@optonline.net> wrote in message 
news:506b5d4b$0$9802$607ed4bc@cv.net...
> On 10/2/2012 5:21 PM, jim stone wrote: >> Not being able to find a small internet radio to buy we liked, we got >> mobile >> phone with which we link with wi-fi to a modem router, and use it as an >> internet radio. >> >> Keeping the phoned plugged into its charger all the time, we are using it >> to >> play *all-day* background classical music through an amplifier and >> speakers. >> >> Since the phone has no 'moving parts' unlike a computer, we are wondering >> if >> this continuous playing all day of the phone is going to shorten its >> working >> life ? >> >> > > Using anything shortens it's working life.
Seems to go against the whole ethos of exercising. Never get out of bed and live forever ...
"jim stone" <tgh6h56nzh@mail.invalid> wrote in message 
news:k4flsm$pbt$1@dont-email.me...
> Not being able to find a small internet radio to buy we liked, we got > mobile phone with which we link with wi-fi to a modem router, and use it > as an internet radio. > > Keeping the phoned plugged into its charger all the time, we are using it > to play *all-day* background classical music through an amplifier and > speakers. > > Since the phone has no 'moving parts' unlike a computer, we are wondering > if this continuous playing all day of the phone is going to shorten its > working life ?
You'll have dropped it well before it wears out :-). BTW, a cheap PC speaker set might be handy if you want a little more volume. And you can probably find a decent streaming client if you have your music sitting on a PC somewhere. Paul DS.