Forums

Using mobile phone as an internet radio

Started by jim stone October 2, 2012
William Sommerwerck wrote:
>> There are many factors that cause something to fail. I you >> don't use it, it has no working life. I don't wish to play >> semantics but if you use it you are using up its working life. >=20 > Not so. With mechanical devices, regular moderate use provides a longer=
> useful lifetime than using the device only rarely. >=20 >=20
Yes, this is also true with EM (Electro-Mechanical) devices like=20 pinballs and jukeboxes (and other arcade games)- regular use keeps the=20 contacts on the relays clean from their designed in rubbing action=20 (overtravel). If the machine is not used then the contacts tend to=20 oxidize and not pass electrical current well leading to service calls. HOWEVER the topic here is a solid state mobile phone - and that device=20 really doesn't care too much if it is on or off as long as it operates=20 in a reasonable temperature range (around 20 - 35C). Chances are it will = be obsolete before it fails if it runs cool to the touch. Heat is the enemy of electronics, mostly capacitors - and their life=20 gets quite short the warmer the operating temperature gets above=20 50C...just read the spec sheets. Typical electrolytics endurance: - up=20 to 5,000 Hours at 105=B0C or about 210 days (7 months) running 24/7. John :-#)# --=20 (Please post followups or tech enquiries to the newsgroup) John's Jukes Ltd. 2343 Main St., Vancouver, BC, Canada V5T 3C9 Call (604)872-5757 or Fax 872-2010 (Pinballs, Jukes, Video Games) www.flippers.com "Old pinballers never die, they just flip out."
Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Wed, 3 Oct 2012 09:28:13 +1000, "Phil Allison" <phil_a@tpg.com.au> > wrote: > >> "Graham." > >>> An incandescent light bulb is a good example, If it lasts 1000 hours >>> when run continuously, its life will be considerably shorter if run >>> (say) 4 hours a day and the time it is on added up. >> ** Where ever did you get that nonsense from ?? > > It's not nonsense. The inrush current of a cold filament can shorten > the filament life. That's why light bulbs usually blow up when you > turn them on, not while they're running. The induced magnetic field > also tends to "twang" the filament, which can break the filament if it > were somehow mechanically weakened. > > While attending kollege in the 1960's, I worked for a short time as a > non-union projectionist at a movie theater. Besides babysitting the > projectors, I had to deal with the flashing light bulb marquee. I > vaguely recall that there were something like 2000 40 watt light > bulbs. Roughly once per week, my job was to replace the blown bulbs > from a rickety pre-OSHA 20ft wooden ladder, sometimes at night. I > didn't keep count, but every week, we would lose about 20 light bulbs. > Doing the math, that means after about 2 years, ALL the light bulbs > would have been replaced at least once. At 8 hrs run per day, that's > 800 hrs lifetime which isn't all that great, especially since we were > running the bulbs at reduced voltage to improve the lifetime. We used > the same bulbs in the theater foyer and lobby, where they were NOT > cycled on and off like the flashing marquee. I rarely replaced those > bulbs and they seemed to last forever. > >> Some web forum ? > > If you repeat something often enough, it eventually becomes dogma. >
Well-designed lighting circuits provide 'keep-alive' voltage to the filaments to reduce most of the inrush current. Might have put you out of that job though... John :-#)# -- (Please post followups or tech enquiries to the newsgroup) John's Jukes Ltd. 2343 Main St., Vancouver, BC, Canada V5T 3C9 Call (604)872-5757 or Fax 872-2010 (Pinballs, Jukes, Video Games) www.flippers.com "Old pinballers never die, they just flip out."
Just like not using it does in fact.

Brian

-- 
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is  active
"Tom Biasi" <tombiasi@optonline.net> wrote in message 
news:506b5d4b$0$9802$607ed4bc@cv.net...
> On 10/2/2012 5:21 PM, jim stone wrote: >> Not being able to find a small internet radio to buy we liked, we got >> mobile >> phone with which we link with wi-fi to a modem router, and use it as an >> internet radio. >> >> Keeping the phoned plugged into its charger all the time, we are using it >> to >> play *all-day* background classical music through an amplifier and >> speakers. >> >> Since the phone has no 'moving parts' unlike a computer, we are wondering >> if >> this continuous playing all day of the phone is going to shorten its >> working >> life ? >> >> > > Using anything shortens it's working life.
In article
<0ae7fdaf-9a45-4fd5-8800-9a6588a7f7f3@q4g2000vbg.googlegroups.com>,
   hr(bob) hofmann@att.net <hrhofmann@att.net> wrote:

> He is right, the stresses involved in the turn-on of the bulb each > time is equal to several hours of continuous running. If you cycle a > bulb on and off every few seconds, the total on time before the bulb > fails will be only a few hundered hours for a 1000 hour rated bulb,
It would be a strange way to rate the life of a lamp - on constantly, since this pretty well never happens. Do you find the 'flasher' lamps on your car failing more quickly than similar lamps which don't flash? -- *A plateau is a high form of flattery* Dave Plowman dave@davenoise.co.uk London SW To e-mail, change noise into sound.
In article <k4fn6h$1op$1@dont-email.me>, William Sommerwerck
<grizzledgeezer@comcast.net> scribeth thus
>"Tom Biasi" <tombiasi@optonline.net> wrote in message >news:506b5d4b$0$9802$607ed4bc@cv.net... >> On 10/2/2012 5:21 PM, jim stone wrote: > >>> Not being able to find a small internet radio to buy we liked, >>> we got a mobile phone with which we link with WiFi to a modem >>> router, and use it as an internet radio. > >>> Keeping the phoned plugged into its charger all the time, we are >>> using it to play *all-day* background classical music through an >>> amplifier and speakers. > >>> Since the phone has no "moving parts" unlike a computer, we are >>> wondering if this continuous playing all day of the phone is going >>> to shorten its working life ? > >> Using anything shortens its working life. > >Not so. There aren't any obvious failure mechanisms in solid-state devices >(other than dopant migration in high-power output transistors).
Yes interesting that especially in high power RF transistors, 'tho I believe in such cases its paralled emitter connections that start going open circuit...
> >It's also true that most mechanical devices "like" moderate use. Letting >anything mechanical "sit" most of the time will probably cause it fail >sooner than if receives regular use. > >It's now possible to build computers without moving parts (other than the >optical drives). My new computer has a solid-state "hard disk", and you >wouldn't believe how fast it boots up, or how fast programs start to run. > >
Indeed they do just got one, not in this machine but very fast indeed. They still it seems fail though... -- Tony Sayer
Tom Biasi wrote:
>> Not so. With mechanical devices, regular moderate use provides a longer >> useful lifetime than using the device only rarely. >> >> > I don't agree but will say no more.
Laser printers. I have given away for parts several laser printers because they sat unused 99% of the time, and started to jam when I printed the one or two pages a month I needed them for. Not only did the rubber wheels dry out and lose their ability to grab paper, they flatten where they are pressed against something. I have a perfectly good Samsung laser printer in that condition now. My choices are to once a week clean out a jam, and clean the feed roller; print something everyday (a waste of paper); spend $15 for a new roller (including postage) and an hour to install it; or wait for a sale (every 2-3 months) and buy a newer faster, higher resolution model with a 2,000 page toner cartridge included for less than the cost of a full load toner. Geoff. -- Geoffrey S. Mendelson, N3OWJ/4X1GM/KBUH7245/KBUW5379 "Owning a smartphone: Technology's equivalent to learning to play chopsticks on the piano as a child and thinking you're a musician." (sent to me by a friend)
"Tom Biasi" <tombiasi@optonline.net> wrote in message 
news:506b5d4b$0$9802$607ed4bc@cv.net...
> On 10/2/2012 5:21 PM, jim stone wrote: >> Not being able to find a small internet radio to buy we liked, we got >> mobile >> phone with which we link with wi-fi to a modem router, and use it as an >> internet radio. >> >> Keeping the phoned plugged into its charger all the time, we are using it >> to >> play *all-day* background classical music through an amplifier and >> speakers. >> >> Since the phone has no 'moving parts' unlike a computer, we are wondering >> if >> this continuous playing all day of the phone is going to shorten its >> working >> life ? >> >> > > Using anything shortens it's working life.
I can vouch for the remark made but I can give you more details too: I use smartphones, tablets and laptops to listen to internet radio all the time and I've only had one device that suffered because of that. What happened to that particular device is the WiFi quit working and it doesn't even work after a factory reset. But out of all the other devices I've used they haven't demonstrated any problems at all. Rocky
>> Using anything shortens its working life.
> I can vouch for the remark made but I can give you more details too:
> I use smartphones, tablets and laptops to listen to internet radio all the > time and I've only had one device that suffered because of that. What > happened to that particular device is the WiFi quit working and it doesn't > even work after a factory reset.
Who knows why the WiFi quit? The radio could have failed simply because the chip went bad. HP has had problems with the radios in some of its notebooks.
"William Sommerwerck" <grizzledgeezer@comcast.net> wrote in message 
news:k4hen1$ngj$1@dont-email.me...
>>> Using anything shortens its working life. > >> I can vouch for the remark made but I can give you more details too: > >> I use smartphones, tablets and laptops to listen to internet radio all >> the >> time and I've only had one device that suffered because of that. What >> happened to that particular device is the WiFi quit working and it >> doesn't >> even work after a factory reset. > > Who knows why the WiFi quit? The radio could have failed simply because > the > chip went bad. > > HP has had problems with the radios in some of its notebooks.
Yes, I've heard that and I've even seen one person that no longer has WiFi on their HP notebook but they claimed it was the switch itself that quit working so I try not to use the hardware WiFi switch on an HP notebook. Me, I've had a power plug fail on an HP ZD7000 notebook and that was common for that particular notebook. I've also had a DVD fail on an HP DV8000 notebook but when the second DVD failed too I went back to the first DVD and it has been working fine since then. I doubt if I'll ever figure that one out unless if it was a problem with the connector. Other than that, I've seen a lot of videos on youtube with problematic HPs where if it isn't the WiFi that goes out it is the video. Case in point: HP 's Worst Laptop Ever - Pavilion ZD8000 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2stqQtQePcM&hd=1 Oddly enough I skipped getting the HP ZD8000 because I went from an HP ZD7000 to the HP DV8000 where the ZD8000 looks more like the ZD7000 than the DV8000. FYI the only device I had that lost the WiFi was a Pharos Traveler 137 that I got real cheap when a place was getting rid of them so I wasn't too upset when the WiFi quit on that.
><http://www.pharosgps.com/products/proddetail.asp?prod=001_PTL137_8.00><
But the video on certain Dell Laptops? Don't get me started. Rocky
On 10/03/2012 05:12 AM, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
> In article > <0ae7fdaf-9a45-4fd5-8800-9a6588a7f7f3@q4g2000vbg.googlegroups.com>, > hr(bob) hofmann@att.net<hrhofmann@att.net> wrote: > >> He is right, the stresses involved in the turn-on of the bulb each >> time is equal to several hours of continuous running. If you cycle a >> bulb on and off every few seconds, the total on time before the bulb >> fails will be only a few hundered hours for a 1000 hour rated bulb, > > It would be a strange way to rate the life of a lamp - on constantly, > since this pretty well never happens. > > Do you find the 'flasher' lamps on your car failing more quickly than > similar lamps which don't flash? >
I don't know of any data that supports this common idea, but I'd be interested in reading about it if anybody's actually done the experiment carefully. Electromigration is a smaller effect in an AC bulb, since the leading order effect cancels. I suspect that the notion that cycling is hard on bulbs comes from the way that the bulb often fails at turn-on, when the thinnest hot spot vapourizes before the rest of the filament has a chance to come up to temperature and reduce the inrush current. The tungsten in the lamp is run within a few hundred kelvins of its melting point, so it's always in the fully annealed state, which ought to mean that there are no metal fatigue mechanisms operating, just material migration due to sublimation. Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 hobbs at electrooptical dot net http://electrooptical.net