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Using mobile phone as an internet radio

Started by jim stone October 2, 2012
Not being able to find a small internet radio to buy we liked, we got mobile 
phone with which we link with wi-fi to a modem router, and use it as an 
internet radio.

Keeping the phoned plugged into its charger all the time, we are using it to 
play *all-day* background classical music through an amplifier and speakers.

Since the phone has no 'moving parts' unlike a computer, we are wondering if 
this continuous playing all day of the phone is going to shorten its working 
life ? 


On 10/2/2012 5:21 PM, jim stone wrote:
> Not being able to find a small internet radio to buy we liked, we got mobile > phone with which we link with wi-fi to a modem router, and use it as an > internet radio. > > Keeping the phoned plugged into its charger all the time, we are using it to > play *all-day* background classical music through an amplifier and speakers. > > Since the phone has no 'moving parts' unlike a computer, we are wondering if > this continuous playing all day of the phone is going to shorten its working > life ? > >
Using anything shortens it's working life.
"Tom Biasi" <tombiasi@optonline.net> wrote in message
news:506b5d4b$0$9802$607ed4bc@cv.net...
> On 10/2/2012 5:21 PM, jim stone wrote:
>> Not being able to find a small internet radio to buy we liked, >> we got a mobile phone with which we link with WiFi to a modem >> router, and use it as an internet radio.
>> Keeping the phoned plugged into its charger all the time, we are >> using it to play *all-day* background classical music through an >> amplifier and speakers.
>> Since the phone has no "moving parts" unlike a computer, we are >> wondering if this continuous playing all day of the phone is going >> to shorten its working life ?
> Using anything shortens its working life.
Not so. There aren't any obvious failure mechanisms in solid-state devices (other than dopant migration in high-power output transistors). It's also true that most mechanical devices "like" moderate use. Letting anything mechanical "sit" most of the time will probably cause it fail sooner than if receives regular use. It's now possible to build computers without moving parts (other than the optical drives). My new computer has a solid-state "hard disk", and you wouldn't believe how fast it boots up, or how fast programs start to run.
On 10/2/2012 5:43 PM, William Sommerwerck wrote:
> "Tom Biasi" <tombiasi@optonline.net> wrote in message > news:506b5d4b$0$9802$607ed4bc@cv.net... >> On 10/2/2012 5:21 PM, jim stone wrote: > >>> Not being able to find a small internet radio to buy we liked, >>> we got a mobile phone with which we link with WiFi to a modem >>> router, and use it as an internet radio. > >>> Keeping the phoned plugged into its charger all the time, we are >>> using it to play *all-day* background classical music through an >>> amplifier and speakers. > >>> Since the phone has no "moving parts" unlike a computer, we are >>> wondering if this continuous playing all day of the phone is going >>> to shorten its working life ? > >> Using anything shortens its working life. > > Not so. There aren't any obvious failure mechanisms in solid-state devices > (other than dopant migration in high-power output transistors). > > It's also true that most mechanical devices "like" moderate use. Letting > anything mechanical "sit" most of the time will probably cause it fail > sooner than if receives regular use. > > It's now possible to build computers without moving parts (other than the > optical drives). My new computer has a solid-state "hard disk", and you > wouldn't believe how fast it boots up, or how fast programs start to run. > >
There are many factors that cause something to fail. I you don't use it, it has no working life. I don't wish to play semantics but if you use it you are using up it's working life.
> There are many factors that cause something to fail. I you > don't use it, it has no working life. I don't wish to play > semantics but if you use it you are using up its working life.
Not so. With mechanical devices, regular moderate use provides a longer useful lifetime than using the device only rarely.
William Sommerwerck wrote:

> optical drives). My new computer has a solid-state "hard disk", and you > wouldn't believe how fast it boots up, or how fast programs start to run.
These, if flash memory, do have a definite wear out mechanism, although they do try to avoid writing to the same spot, even if the software does, to mitigate this.
> >
On 10/2/2012 6:32 PM, William Sommerwerck wrote:
>> There are many factors that cause something to fail. I you >> don't use it, it has no working life. I don't wish to play >> semantics but if you use it you are using up its working life. > > Not so. With mechanical devices, regular moderate use provides a longer > useful lifetime than using the device only rarely. > >
I don't agree but will say no more. Regards, Tom
On Tuesday, October 2, 2012 2:21:28 PM UTC-7, jim stone wrote:
> Not being able to find a small internet radio to buy we liked, we got mobile > > phone with which we link with wi-fi to a modem router, and use it as an > > internet radio. > > > > Keeping the phoned plugged into its charger all the time, we are using it to > > play *all-day* background classical music through an amplifier and speakers. > > > > Since the phone has no 'moving parts' unlike a computer, we are wondering if > > this continuous playing all day of the phone is going to shorten its working > > life ?
The battery may not like being plugged in forever.
On Tuesday, October 2, 2012 2:21:28 PM UTC-7, jim stone wrote:
> Not being able to find a small internet radio to buy we liked, we got mob=
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How much did you pay for the phone? Would it bother you greatly if it is s= tolen or if the battery fails to hold a charge, did you get it fairly cheap= , did you buy a new mobile phone for regular use and this is an old phone f= rom a previous cellular plan, etc.? =20 I used to use an old cell phone (well, it was "old" in the sense that I cha= nged cell phone carriers) to play music from the internal microSD card for = my plants in my office (a Mythbusters episode showed that plants like music= ), until the repetition of the songs drove *me* crazy. =3D)
On Tue, 02 Oct 2012 18:57:07 -0400, Tom Biasi <tombiasi@optonline.net>
wrote:

>On 10/2/2012 6:32 PM, William Sommerwerck wrote: >>> There are many factors that cause something to fail. I you >>> don't use it, it has no working life. I don't wish to play >>> semantics but if you use it you are using up its working life. >> >> Not so. With mechanical devices, regular moderate use provides a longer >> useful lifetime than using the device only rarely. >> >> >I don't agree but will say no more. >Regards, >Tom
Not sure if my News server supports x-posts to the entire Usenet, but I digress. An incandescent light bulb is a good example, If it lasts 1000 hours when run continuously, its life will be considerably shorter if run (say) 4 hours a day and the time it is on added up. Equipment with lots of thermionic devices like very early computers were, as far as practical, never switched off because of the likelihood of failure. -- Graham. %Profound_observation%