Forums

Splattering solder into eye?

Started by Peter Hucker October 25, 2008
On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 21:58:04 +0100, William Sommerwerck <grizzledgeezer@comcast.net> wrote:

>> Do the eyelids not automatically close? > > Yes -- right on the piece of solder.
Your reactions aren't up to scratch then. They're supposed to close while the solder is flying towards you. -- http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com (( _______ _______ /\O O\ /O /\ / \ \ / O /O \ / O \O____O\ )) ((/_____O/ \\ /O / \O O\ / \ / O / \O O\ O/ \/_____O/ \O____O\/ )) )) ((
On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 02:27:03 -0000, Matt J. McCullar <mccullar@flash.net> wrote:

> >> >> I've never heard of any accidents or serious injuries resulting from stuff > hitting a cyclist's eyes. >> > > It happens. Some states have laws for motorcyclists
MOTORcyclists travel faster.
> requiring them to wear > eye protection while riding. I've worn eyeglasses for many years, so I've > never had anything hit me in the eye while riding a bicycle. But when it > does, it's going to be at the worst possible time. > > Once I was leaning over the back of an open television set to squirt some > tuner cleaner into it. Somehow that spray liquid shot back out through > another hole in the mechanical tuner and managed to crawl over my glasses > and hit me right smack in the eye. Yeah, it stung a little, but I did > manage to wash it all out right away. > > Solder joints are mysterious creatures. One that looks perfectly normal can > literally explode when touched by a soldering iron. I sure wouldn't want a > piece of hot solder, no matter how small, to hit me in MY eye. Stick a > soldering iron into a head of lettuce if you want to know what it sounds > like.
I'm not even going to consider how you might accidentally throw the soldering IRON into your eye! -- http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com Why do they rate a movie "R" for "adult language?" The only people I hear using that language are teenagers.
Peter Hucker wrote:
> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 21:58:04 +0100, William Sommerwerck <grizzledgeezer@comcast.net> wrote: > > >>>Do the eyelids not automatically close? >> >>Yes -- right on the piece of solder. > > > Your reactions aren't up to scratch then. They're supposed to close while the solder is flying towards you. >
How do you figure that, without knowing the velocity of the solder - or even whether one sees and reacts to it? And, as to the idea you posted that a bicycle rider can close his eyelids fast enough - ridiculous. Even an occasional rider can easily hit 40 mph or more downhill, the object can be launched from a car's tire at high speed, a bug may come from the side etc. You have no way of knowing whether his - or your - reactions are fast enough for the eyelids to protect from solder splatter or airborne objects/bugs/whatever while bicycle riding, because you don't have any data on the speed at which the object approaches the eye or the distance it must travel or even whether the conditions allow the eye to detect the approaching object. Sheesh! Even people walking have gotten stuff in their eyes, blown by a gust of wind or whatever. Ed
"ehsjr" <ehsjr@NOSPAMverizon.net> wrote in message 
news:Oo7Nk.588$225.555@nwrddc02.gnilink.net...
> Peter Hucker wrote: >> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 21:58:04 +0100, William Sommerwerck >> <grizzledgeezer@comcast.net> wrote: >> >> >>>>Do the eyelids not automatically close? >>> >>>Yes -- right on the piece of solder. >> >> >> Your reactions aren't up to scratch then. They're supposed to close >> while the solder is flying towards you. >> > > How do you figure that, without knowing the velocity > of the solder - or even whether one sees and reacts to > it? > > And, as to the idea you posted that a bicycle rider can close > his eyelids fast enough - ridiculous. Even an occasional > rider can easily hit 40 mph or more downhill, the object > can be launched from a car's tire at high speed, a bug > may come from the side etc. > > You have no way of knowing whether his - or your - reactions > are fast enough for the eyelids to protect from solder splatter > or airborne objects/bugs/whatever while bicycle riding, because > you don't have any data on the speed at which the object > approaches the eye or the distance it must travel or even > whether the conditions allow the eye to detect the approaching > object. Sheesh! Even people walking have gotten stuff in their > eyes, blown by a gust of wind or whatever.
Methinks we may be dealing with a troll here, but eye protection while operating a vehicle, whether motorized or not, is important for maintaining control as well as protection from eye injury. The eye rapidly repairs corneal abrasions, and I have heard that it is the fastest-healing part of the body. Here is an interesting link: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3225/is_1_70/ai_n6159408 You are probably going to be injured much more seriously by losing control of your vehicle, rather than the direct result of a foreign object hitting the eye. It may be unlikely that both eyes would be compromised at the same time, but it could happen. If you get steel slivers in your eye, you can use an eye magnet: http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2007/01/800lb_magnet_tr.html And, your government grant dollars at work: http://www.1ad.army.mil/Safety/Vision%20Conservation%20Program/EYE%20PROTECTION.pdf More on eye safety: http://www.eyehealthillinois.org/eyesafety/index.html Paul
On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 22:31:38 -0400, "Paul E. Schoen"
<pstech@smart.net>wrote:

>> Peter Hucker wrote: >>> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 21:58:04 +0100, William Sommerwerck >>> <grizzledgeezer@comcast.net> wrote: >>> >>> >>>>>Do the eyelids not automatically close? >>>> >>>>Yes -- right on the piece of solder. >>> >>> >>> Your reactions aren't up to scratch then. They're supposed to close >>> while the solder is flying towards you. >>> >> >> How do you figure that, without knowing the velocity >> of the solder - or even whether one sees and reacts to >> it? >> >> And, as to the idea you posted that a bicycle rider can close >> his eyelids fast enough - ridiculous. Even an occasional >> rider can easily hit 40 mph or more downhill, the object >> can be launched from a car's tire at high speed, a bug >> may come from the side etc. >> >> You have no way of knowing whether his - or your - reactions >> are fast enough for the eyelids to protect from solder splatter >> or airborne objects/bugs/whatever while bicycle riding, because >> you don't have any data on the speed at which the object >> approaches the eye or the distance it must travel or even >> whether the conditions allow the eye to detect the approaching >> object. Sheesh! Even people walking have gotten stuff in their >> eyes, blown by a gust of wind or whatever. > >Methinks we may be dealing with a troll here,
CHA CHING!!! Peter Hucker, one of Usenet's most prolific trolls. Nothing wrong with a little trolling under the right circumstances but Peter takes it to the extreme.
"Claude Hopper" <boobooililililil@roadrunner.com> wrote in message 
news:pqmdneNk9vLh8ZnUnZ2dnUVZ_rLinZ2d@giganews.com...


>> >> Not bad, you may just loose your eye. WEAR SAFTY GLASSES! >> >> > No but I used to get the smoke from frying rosin in my eye when I used > to build short wave radios many years ago. Burns like nothing else. > > Safety glasses don't help for that.
That's why we insist our students wear safety goggles when soldering..
"Meat Plow" <meat@petitmorte.net> wrote in message 
news:2a0ao6.jta.17.1@news.alt.net...
> On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 22:31:38 -0400, "Paul E. Schoen" > <pstech@smart.net>wrote: > >>> Peter Hucker wrote: >>>> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 21:58:04 +0100, William Sommerwerck >>>> <grizzledgeezer@comcast.net> wrote: >>>> >>>> >>>>>>Do the eyelids not automatically close? >>>>> >>>>>Yes -- right on the piece of solder. >>>> >>>> >>>> Your reactions aren't up to scratch then. They're supposed to close >>>> while the solder is flying towards you. >>>> >>> >>> How do you figure that, without knowing the velocity >>> of the solder - or even whether one sees and reacts to >>> it? >>> >>> And, as to the idea you posted that a bicycle rider can close >>> his eyelids fast enough - ridiculous. Even an occasional >>> rider can easily hit 40 mph or more downhill, the object >>> can be launched from a car's tire at high speed, a bug >>> may come from the side etc. >>> >>> You have no way of knowing whether his - or your - reactions >>> are fast enough for the eyelids to protect from solder splatter >>> or airborne objects/bugs/whatever while bicycle riding, because >>> you don't have any data on the speed at which the object >>> approaches the eye or the distance it must travel or even >>> whether the conditions allow the eye to detect the approaching >>> object. Sheesh! Even people walking have gotten stuff in their >>> eyes, blown by a gust of wind or whatever. >> >>Methinks we may be dealing with a troll here, > > CHA CHING!!! > > Peter Hucker, one of Usenet's most prolific trolls.
PHucker spends most of his time on alt.binaries.chatter - his favourite topic is bragging that he goes about his life without regard for rules or laws, he seems to have branched out into net-kopping on the sci groups lately.
On Mon, 27 Oct 2008 06:56:50 -0000, Meat Plow <meat@petitmorte.net> wrote:

> On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 22:31:38 -0400, "Paul E. Schoen" > <pstech@smart.net>wrote: > >>> Peter Hucker wrote: >>>> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 21:58:04 +0100, William Sommerwerck >>>> <grizzledgeezer@comcast.net> wrote: >>>> >>>> >>>>>> Do the eyelids not automatically close? >>>>> >>>>> Yes -- right on the piece of solder. >>>> >>>> >>>> Your reactions aren't up to scratch then. They're supposed to close >>>> while the solder is flying towards you. >>>> >>> >>> How do you figure that, without knowing the velocity >>> of the solder - or even whether one sees and reacts to >>> it? >>> >>> And, as to the idea you posted that a bicycle rider can close >>> his eyelids fast enough - ridiculous. Even an occasional >>> rider can easily hit 40 mph or more downhill, the object >>> can be launched from a car's tire at high speed, a bug >>> may come from the side etc. >>> >>> You have no way of knowing whether his - or your - reactions >>> are fast enough for the eyelids to protect from solder splatter >>> or airborne objects/bugs/whatever while bicycle riding, because >>> you don't have any data on the speed at which the object >>> approaches the eye or the distance it must travel or even >>> whether the conditions allow the eye to detect the approaching >>> object. Sheesh! Even people walking have gotten stuff in their >>> eyes, blown by a gust of wind or whatever. >> >> Methinks we may be dealing with a troll here, > > CHA CHING!!! > > Peter Hucker, one of Usenet's most prolific trolls. > > Nothing wrong with a little trolling under the right circumstances but > Peter takes it to the extreme.
I asked a simple question. Is asking a question now considered troling? -- http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com If the English language made any sense, lackadaisical would have something to do with a shortage of flowers.
On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 23:52:14 -0000, ehsjr <ehsjr@NOSPAMverizon.net> wrote:

> Peter Hucker wrote: >> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 21:58:04 +0100, William Sommerwerck <grizzledgeezer@comcast.net> wrote: >> >> >>>> Do the eyelids not automatically close? >>> >>> Yes -- right on the piece of solder. >> >> >> Your reactions aren't up to scratch then. They're supposed to close while the solder is flying towards you. >> > > How do you figure that, without knowing the velocity > of the solder - or even whether one sees and reacts to > it?
Experience. I've virtually never had anything hit my eyeball. But have often had things hit my closed eye.
> And, as to the idea you posted that a bicycle rider can close > his eyelids fast enough - ridiculous. Even an occasional > rider can easily hit 40 mph or more downhill, the object > can be launched from a car's tire at high speed, a bug > may come from the side etc.
Perhaps. But it hasn't happened to me. If a car is overtaking and throwing up stuff, I tend to squint my eyes in advance!
> You have no way of knowing whether his - or your - reactions > are fast enough for the eyelids to protect from solder splatter > or airborne objects/bugs/whatever while bicycle riding, because > you don't have any data on the speed at which the object > approaches the eye or the distance it must travel or even > whether the conditions allow the eye to detect the approaching > object. Sheesh! Even people walking have gotten stuff in their > eyes, blown by a gust of wind or whatever.
Dust perhaps, but not large enough objects to cause damage. -- http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com It seems a farm boy accidentally overturned his wagon load of corn. The farmer who lived nearby heard the noise. "Hey Willis!!" the farmer yelled. "Forget your troubles. Come in with us. Then I'll help you get the wagon up." "That's mighty nice of you, " Willis answered, "but I don't think Pa would like me to." "Aw, come on," the farmer insisted. "Well okay," the boy finally agreed, and added, "But Pa won't like it." After a hearty dinner, Willis thanked his host. "I feel a lot better now, but I know Pa is going to be real upset." "Don't be foolish !" the neighbor said with a smile. "By the way, where is he?" "Under the wagon."
On Mon, 27 Oct 2008 02:31:38 -0000, Paul E. Schoen <pstech@smart.net> wrote:

> > "ehsjr" <ehsjr@NOSPAMverizon.net> wrote in message > news:Oo7Nk.588$225.555@nwrddc02.gnilink.net... >> Peter Hucker wrote: >>> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 21:58:04 +0100, William Sommerwerck >>> <grizzledgeezer@comcast.net> wrote: >>> >>> >>>>> Do the eyelids not automatically close? >>>> >>>> Yes -- right on the piece of solder. >>> >>> >>> Your reactions aren't up to scratch then. They're supposed to close >>> while the solder is flying towards you. >>> >> >> How do you figure that, without knowing the velocity >> of the solder - or even whether one sees and reacts to >> it? >> >> And, as to the idea you posted that a bicycle rider can close >> his eyelids fast enough - ridiculous. Even an occasional >> rider can easily hit 40 mph or more downhill, the object >> can be launched from a car's tire at high speed, a bug >> may come from the side etc. >> >> You have no way of knowing whether his - or your - reactions >> are fast enough for the eyelids to protect from solder splatter >> or airborne objects/bugs/whatever while bicycle riding, because >> you don't have any data on the speed at which the object >> approaches the eye or the distance it must travel or even >> whether the conditions allow the eye to detect the approaching >> object. Sheesh! Even people walking have gotten stuff in their >> eyes, blown by a gust of wind or whatever. > > Methinks we may be dealing with a troll here, but eye protection while > operating a vehicle, whether motorized or not, is important for maintaining > control as well as protection from eye injury. The eye rapidly repairs > corneal abrasions, and I have heard that it is the fastest-healing part of > the body. Here is an interesting link: > http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3225/is_1_70/ai_n6159408 > > You are probably going to be injured much more seriously by losing control > of your vehicle, rather than the direct result of a foreign object hitting > the eye. It may be unlikely that both eyes would be compromised at the same > time, but it could happen. > > If you get steel slivers in your eye, you can use an eye magnet: > http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2007/01/800lb_magnet_tr.html
Now that sounds cool. I take it they make absolutely sure the doctor nurse and patient are not wearing any metallic rings etc first!!!
> And, your government grant dollars at work: > http://www.1ad.army.mil/Safety/Vision%20Conservation%20Program/EYE%20PROTECTION.pdf > > More on eye safety: > http://www.eyehealthillinois.org/eyesafety/index.html
-- http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com Stupidly named websites: http://www.whorepresents.com http://www.expertsexchange.com http://www.penisland.net http://www.therapistfinder.com http://www.powergenitalia.com http://www.molestationnursery.com http://gasheating.co.uk