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How to solder very thin stranded wire?

Started by DaveC February 21, 2013
This is one conductor in a cable from some iPod earphones:

http://www.tinyuploads.com/images/mizPu4.jpg

What is the best way to deal with the fibre strands and to tin the wire?

Thanks,
Dave

On Wed, 20 Feb 2013 23:06:45 -0800, DaveC <invalid@invalid.net> wrote:

>This is one conductor in a cable from some iPod earphones: >http://www.tinyuploads.com/images/mizPu4.jpg >What is the best way to deal with the fibre strands and to tin the wire?
Plan A: Find a short length of very fine uninsulated wire. A single strand from some stranded wire is what I use. Wrap it around the insulation about 2 times, and then continue wrapping around the tinsel wire. Clip off the excess at the end. Solder the wrapped wire to the replacement connector. Plan B: Buy a new iPod earphone. They're cheaper than the replacment connector. -- Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
DaveC <invalid@invalid.net> wrote in message
news:0001HW.CD4B078504C79076B04179BF@news.eternal-september.org...
> This is one conductor in a cable from some iPod earphones: > > http://www.tinyuploads.com/images/mizPu4.jpg > > What is the best way to deal with the fibre strands and to tin the wire? > > Thanks, > Dave >
Wire-wrap was considered an adequate technique for a decade. 2 pieces of very fine stripped wire, lay alongside each one , ends laying together, a microdot of hotmelt glue on the ends and then when cool gives something to twist between fingers, then coat with more hotmelt as insulation. No actual soldering
> Plan A: Find a short length of very fine uninsulated wire. A single > strand from some stranded wire is what I use. Wrap it around the > insulation about 2 times, and then continue wrapping around the tinsel > wire. Clip off the excess at the end. Solder the wrapped wire to the > replacement connector.
Sounds good.
> Plan B: Buy a new iPod earphone. They're cheaper than the replacment > connector.
Not using it as earbuds. Just re-purposing the cord for a corded single-earphone-with-mic unit. Have both, and am an avid "not to the landfill will you go" kind of guy... And beside, I'll learn something new (ie, soldering tinsel wire). Dave
> Wire-wrap was considered an adequate technique for a decade. > 2 pieces of very fine stripped wire, lay alongside each one , ends laying > together, a microdot of hotmelt glue on the ends and then when cool gives > something to twist between fingers, then coat with more hotmelt as > insulation. No actual soldering
Very interesting. But how does this apply to my particular need? Dave
On Feb 21, 2:06=A0am, DaveC <inva...@invalid.net> wrote:
> This is one conductor in a cable from some iPod earphones: > > http://www.tinyuploads.com/images/mizPu4.jpg > > What is the best way to deal with the fibre strands and to tin the wire? > > Thanks, > Dave
I did something like that... I just teased the wire away from the fibers, cut the fibers, and the enamel on the wire burned off from the heat of the soldering iron. George H.
On Thu, 21 Feb 2013 06:41:32 -0800 (PST), George Herold
<gherold@teachspin.com> wrote:

>On Feb 21, 2:06&#2013266080;am, DaveC <inva...@invalid.net> wrote: >> This is one conductor in a cable from some iPod earphones: >> >> http://www.tinyuploads.com/images/mizPu4.jpg >> >> What is the best way to deal with the fibre strands and to tin the wire? >> >> Thanks, >> Dave > >I did something like that... I just teased the wire away from the >fibers, cut the fibers, and the enamel on the wire burned off from the >heat of the soldering iron. > >George H.
I don't even bother to try to tease the fibers away. I just get a good blob of solder on the tip of the iron and push the wire into it. In my experience everything burns away except the wire. Eric
On Thu, 21 Feb 2013 09:05:25 -0800, etpm@whidbey.com wrote:

>On Thu, 21 Feb 2013 06:41:32 -0800 (PST), George Herold ><gherold@teachspin.com> wrote: > >>On Feb 21, 2:06&#2013266080;am, DaveC <inva...@invalid.net> wrote: >>> This is one conductor in a cable from some iPod earphones: >>> >>> http://www.tinyuploads.com/images/mizPu4.jpg >>> >>> What is the best way to deal with the fibre strands and to tin the wire? >>> >>> Thanks, >>> Dave >> >>I did something like that... I just teased the wire away from the >>fibers, cut the fibers, and the enamel on the wire burned off from the >>heat of the soldering iron. >> >>George H. >I don't even bother to try to tease the fibers away. I just get a good >blob of solder on the tip of the iron and push the wire into it. In my >experience everything burns away except the wire. >Eric
That works for "SolderEze" coated wire. Regular Formvar doesn't dissolve in solder. ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson | mens | | Analog Innovations | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | Phoenix, Arizona 85048 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
> Regular Formvar doesn't > dissolve in solder. > ...Jim Thompson
For which you would recommend...?
On 2/21/2013 12:24 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Wed, 20 Feb 2013 23:06:45 -0800, DaveC<invalid@invalid.net> wrote: > >> This is one conductor in a cable from some iPod earphones: >> http://www.tinyuploads.com/images/mizPu4.jpg >> What is the best way to deal with the fibre strands and to tin the wire? > > Plan A: Find a short length of very fine uninsulated wire. A single > strand from some stranded wire is what I use. Wrap it around the > insulation about 2 times, and then continue wrapping around the tinsel > wire. Clip off the excess at the end. Solder the wrapped wire to the > replacement connector. > > Plan B: Buy a new iPod earphone. They're cheaper than the replacment > connector. >
You can tin the wire in a solder pot...or blob of solder on the end of an iron. Problem is that it will break almost instantly at the transition point from stiff to flexible. The technique mentioned above seems to be an excellent solution to that problem.