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Rising sea levels could swamp the US coastline by 2050, NASA predicts

Started by Fred Bloggs November 29, 2022
Work was headed by researchers at JPL

NASA's research harnessed satellite altimeter measurements of sea surface height and then correlated them with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration(opens in new tab) (NOAA) tide gauge records dating back over 100 years. As a result, NASA can confidently state that its satellite readings are not anomalous, and are fully supported by findings on the ground.

Kiss goodbye to NO and all of coastal Louisiana. Florida will be reduced to a sand spit.

https://www.livescience.com/us-sea-levels-rising-faster-than-thought
On 11/29/2022 5:50 AM, Fred Bloggs wrote:
> Work was headed by researchers at JPL > > NASA's research harnessed satellite altimeter measurements of sea surface height and then correlated them with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration(opens in new tab) (NOAA) tide gauge records dating back over 100 years. As a result, NASA can confidently state that its satellite readings are not anomalous, and are fully supported by findings on the ground. > > Kiss goodbye to NO and all of coastal Louisiana. Florida will be reduced to a sand spit.
NOAA has an interesting sea level simulator. Someone else had one that was even more graphic (but I can't find, at the current time) The more interesting questions will be relatively short-term. At some point, the costs of bailing out these areas will likely see more public scrutiny. There may come a point where the gummit buys out property owners instead of subsidizing rebuilding efforts. Of course, you're not going to pay "top dollar" for land that will, effectively, be "condemned". So, 7 figure beach front properties may find themselves looking for a "cute" little bungalow -- in Ohio...
On Tue, 29 Nov 2022 04:50:30 -0800 (PST), Fred Bloggs
<bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com> wrote:

>Work was headed by researchers at JPL > >NASA's research harnessed satellite altimeter measurements of sea surface height and then correlated them with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration(opens in new tab) (NOAA) tide gauge records dating back over 100 years. As a result, NASA can confidently state that its satellite readings are not anomalous, and are fully supported by findings on the ground. > >Kiss goodbye to NO and all of coastal Louisiana. Florida will be reduced to a sand spit.
In a few thousand years, unless we resume the normal ice age climate.
On 11/29/2022 8:31 AM, Don Y wrote:
> On 11/29/2022 5:50 AM, Fred Bloggs wrote: >> Work was headed by researchers at JPL >> >> NASA's research harnessed satellite altimeter measurements of sea >> surface height and then correlated them with National Oceanic and >> Atmospheric Administration(opens in new tab) (NOAA) tide gauge records >> dating back over 100 years. As a result, NASA can confidently state >> that its satellite readings are not anomalous, and are fully supported >> by findings on the ground. >> >> Kiss goodbye to NO and all of coastal Louisiana. Florida will be >> reduced to a sand spit. > > NOAA has an interesting sea level simulator.&nbsp; Someone else had one that was > even more graphic (but I can't find, at the current time) > > The more interesting questions will be relatively short-term.&nbsp; At some > point, > the costs of bailing out these areas will likely see more public scrutiny. > There may come a point where the gummit buys out property owners instead of > subsidizing rebuilding efforts. > > Of course, you're not going to pay "top dollar" for land that will, > effectively, be "condemned".&nbsp; So, 7 figure beach front properties may > find themselves looking for a "cute" little bungalow -- in Ohio...
Homeowner's insurance in Florida is already 3x the national average. <https://www.eenews.net/articles/fla-insurance-crisis-deepens-as-rates-soar-companies-fall/>
On 11/29/2022 8:31 AM, Don Y wrote:
> On 11/29/2022 5:50 AM, Fred Bloggs wrote: >> Work was headed by researchers at JPL >> >> NASA's research harnessed satellite altimeter measurements of sea >> surface height and then correlated them with National Oceanic and >> Atmospheric Administration(opens in new tab) (NOAA) tide gauge records >> dating back over 100 years. As a result, NASA can confidently state >> that its satellite readings are not anomalous, and are fully supported >> by findings on the ground. >> >> Kiss goodbye to NO and all of coastal Louisiana. Florida will be >> reduced to a sand spit. > > NOAA has an interesting sea level simulator.&nbsp; Someone else had one that was > even more graphic (but I can't find, at the current time) > > The more interesting questions will be relatively short-term.&nbsp; At some > point, > the costs of bailing out these areas will likely see more public scrutiny. > There may come a point where the gummit buys out property owners instead of > subsidizing rebuilding efforts. > > Of course, you're not going to pay "top dollar" for land that will, > effectively, be "condemned".&nbsp; So, 7 figure beach front properties may > find themselves looking for a "cute" little bungalow -- in Ohio...
Ya, the richies get pushed out from the coasts to the country where they start buying up property. Rents go up. Lower-income locals get pushed out due to NIMBY zoning and lack of new affordable housing. Predatory GOP politicians swoop in to blame the displacement on "woke culture"
On 11/29/2022 9:40 AM, bitrex wrote:
> On 11/29/2022 8:31 AM, Don Y wrote: >> On 11/29/2022 5:50 AM, Fred Bloggs wrote: >>> Work was headed by researchers at JPL >>> >>> NASA's research harnessed satellite altimeter measurements of sea surface >>> height and then correlated them with National Oceanic and Atmospheric >>> Administration(opens in new tab) (NOAA) tide gauge records dating back over >>> 100 years. As a result, NASA can confidently state that its satellite >>> readings are not anomalous, and are fully supported by findings on the ground. >>> >>> Kiss goodbye to NO and all of coastal Louisiana. Florida will be reduced to >>> a sand spit. >> >> NOAA has an interesting sea level simulator.&nbsp; Someone else had one that was >> even more graphic (but I can't find, at the current time) >> >> The more interesting questions will be relatively short-term.&nbsp; At some point, >> the costs of bailing out these areas will likely see more public scrutiny. >> There may come a point where the gummit buys out property owners instead of >> subsidizing rebuilding efforts. >> >> Of course, you're not going to pay "top dollar" for land that will, >> effectively, be "condemned".&nbsp; So, 7 figure beach front properties may >> find themselves looking for a "cute" little bungalow -- in Ohio... > > Ya, the richies get pushed out from the coasts to the country where they start > buying up property. Rents go up. Lower-income locals get pushed out due to > NIMBY zoning and lack of new affordable housing. Predatory GOP politicians > swoop in to blame the displacement on "woke culture"
I think the "smart money" will opt to leave for greener pastures, elsewhere. Even the bits that aren't overtaken by sea level rise will take a beating from "severe weather". Would you want to retire to a place where you spend much of your time *rebuilding* your home?
On Tuesday, November 29, 2022 at 11:41:00 AM UTC-5, bitrex wrote:
> On 11/29/2022 8:31 AM, Don Y wrote: > > On 11/29/2022 5:50 AM, Fred Bloggs wrote: > >> Work was headed by researchers at JPL > >> > >> NASA's research harnessed satellite altimeter measurements of sea > >> surface height and then correlated them with National Oceanic and > >> Atmospheric Administration(opens in new tab) (NOAA) tide gauge records > >> dating back over 100 years. As a result, NASA can confidently state > >> that its satellite readings are not anomalous, and are fully supported > >> by findings on the ground. > >> > >> Kiss goodbye to NO and all of coastal Louisiana. Florida will be > >> reduced to a sand spit. > > > > NOAA has an interesting sea level simulator. Someone else had one that was > > even more graphic (but I can't find, at the current time) > > > > The more interesting questions will be relatively short-term. At some > > point, > > the costs of bailing out these areas will likely see more public scrutiny. > > There may come a point where the gummit buys out property owners instead of > > subsidizing rebuilding efforts. > > > > Of course, you're not going to pay "top dollar" for land that will, > > effectively, be "condemned". So, 7 figure beach front properties may > > find themselves looking for a "cute" little bungalow -- in Ohio... > Ya, the richies get pushed out from the coasts to the country where they > start buying up property. Rents go up. Lower-income locals get pushed > out due to NIMBY zoning and lack of new affordable housing. Predatory > GOP politicians swoop in to blame the displacement on "woke culture"
The coastal destruction fiasco, every bit of it, falls on the simple minded and corrupt localities that approve the relatively flimsy builds they 'should' know will not hold up to extreme weather events. But they want that growth and tax base. There is the technology out there to build structures resistant to every imaginable disaster event, even earthquakes and tornadoes. These nerds have been building hurricane resistant homes for decades. https://www.deltechomes.com/learn-more/hurricane-resistance/ They're just an amalgamation of simple well-known techniques, and because they're nerd-built, they're ugly as sin. I would move out of the area just to get away from having to look at them. All of this, again, is just my opinion.
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On Tuesday, November 29, 2022 at 11:10:24 AM UTC-6, Don Y wrote:

> Would you want to retire to a place where you spend much of your time > *rebuilding* your home?
"much of your time *rebuilding* your home?" Care to admit that is a huge exaggeration? Or a global warming scare technique? 28 year resident of Florida, coastline 1 mile to the NW, 1.8miles W. and 1.2 miles to the SW. We had damage from 1 hurricane in that 28 years. Turned into some nice improvements to our home! And an adventure! :-)
On 11/30/2022 10:09 AM, Lamont Cranston wrote:
> On Tuesday, November 29, 2022 at 11:10:24 AM UTC-6, Don Y wrote: > >> Would you want to retire to a place where you spend much of your time >> *rebuilding* your home? > > "much of your time *rebuilding* your home?" > > Care to admit that is a huge exaggeration? > Or a global warming scare technique? > 28 year resident of Florida, coastline 1 mile to the NW, 1.8miles W. and 1.2 miles to the > SW. We had damage from 1 hurricane in that 28 years. > Turned into some nice improvements to our home! And an adventure! :-)
From <https://usafacts.org/articles/natural-disasters-cost-since-1980/>: "The three states hardest hit financially are Texas, Florida, and Louisiana, which have suffered $286 billion, $226.3 billion, and $183.6 billion in damages since 1980, respectively. (since 1980)" Assume a nominal home is $1M, then that's the equivalent of 226,300 homes. In 40 years. [Of course, if you're living in little $100K shacks, that number would increase, tenfold. And, if you're only incurring $10K of damage, one hundredfold.] WRT disaster costs, generally: "According to NOAA, natural disasters between 2010 and 2019 accounted for 45.1% of total disaster costs since 1980, and those between 2017 and 2019 accounted for 25.7% &mdash; or $460.4 billion." Let us know how things have been for you 20 years *hence* -- when you're older and less excited about "rebuilding" in an even more hostile climate. I wonder if you'll consider it an "adventure", then -- and rely on the generosity of taxpayers to lend a hand at that time... But, hey, if there is no climate change at work here, you wouldn't mind the gummit turning off the money spigot, right?