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Excess Death Rates for Republicans and Democrats During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Started by Fred Bloggs October 4, 2022
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Political affiliation has emerged as a potential risk factor for COVID-19, amid evidence that Republican-leaning counties have had higher COVID-19 death rates than Democrat- leaning counties and evidence of a link between political party affiliation and vaccination views. This study constructs an individual-level dataset with political affiliation and excess death rates during the COVID-19 pandemic via a linkage of 2017 voter registration in Ohio and Florida to mortality data from 2018 to 2021. We estimate substantially higher excess death rates for registered Republicans when compared to registered Democrats, with almost all of the difference concentrated in the period after vaccines were widely available in our study states. Overall, the excess death rate for Republicans was 5.4 percentage points (pp), or 76%, higher than the excess death rate for Democrats. Post- vaccines, the excess death rate gap between Republicans and Democrats widened from 1.6 pp (22% of the Democrat excess death rate) to 10.4 pp (153% of the Democrat excess death rate). The gap in excess death rates between Republicans and Democrats is concentrated in counties with low vaccination rates and only materializes after vaccines became widely available.
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https://www.nber.org/papers/w30512

National Bureau of Economic Research
Conducting and disseminating nonpartisan economic research
#fake
On 10/4/2022 2:24 PM, Fred Bloggs wrote:
> : > Political affiliation has emerged as a potential risk factor for COVID-19, amid evidence that
This is likely purely a consequence of differences in vaccination rates. I.e., one could probably find a similar correlation between intelligence, proactive health care, etc.
On 10/4/2022 5:24 PM, Fred Bloggs wrote:
> : > Political affiliation has emerged as a potential risk factor for COVID-19, amid evidence that Republican-leaning counties have had higher COVID-19 death rates than Democrat- leaning counties and evidence of a link between political party affiliation and vaccination views. This study constructs an individual-level dataset with political affiliation and excess death rates during the COVID-19 pandemic via a linkage of 2017 voter registration in Ohio and Florida to mortality data from 2018 to 2021. We estimate substantially higher excess death rates for registered Republicans when compared to registered Democrats, with almost all of the difference concentrated in the period after vaccines were widely available in our study states. Overall, the excess death rate for Republicans was 5.4 percentage points (pp), or 76%, higher than the excess death rate for Democrats. Post- vaccines, the excess death rate gap between Republicans and Democrats widened from 1.6 pp (22% of the Democrat excess death rate) to 10.4 pp (153% of the Democrat excess death rate). The gap in excess death rates between Republicans and Democrats is concentrated in counties with low vaccination rates and only materializes after vaccines became widely available. > : > > https://www.nber.org/papers/w30512 > > National Bureau of Economic Research > Conducting and disseminating nonpartisan economic research
For a time in the 80s it was Republican policy that "so long as we have more & bigger bombs than the Russians we'll be OK" and people are still here on the Usenet, so it was clearly an optimal strategy.
On Tuesday, October 4, 2022 at 4:35:14 PM UTC-7, Don Y wrote:
> On 10/4/2022 2:24 PM, Fred Bloggs wrote: > > : > > Political affiliation has emerged as a potential risk factor for COVID-19, amid evidence that > This is likely purely a consequence of differences in vaccination rates. I.e., > one could probably find a similar correlation between intelligence, proactive > health care, etc.
Or perhaps because Republicans are richer. And rich people are generally poor in health. Or they are watching more TV, etc.
On 10/4/2022 6:17 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
> On Tuesday, October 4, 2022 at 4:35:14 PM UTC-7, Don Y wrote: >> On 10/4/2022 2:24 PM, Fred Bloggs wrote: >>> : Political affiliation has emerged as a potential risk factor for >>> COVID-19, amid evidence that >> This is likely purely a consequence of differences in vaccination rates. >> I.e., one could probably find a similar correlation between intelligence, >> proactive health care, etc. > > Or perhaps because Republicans are richer. And rich people are generally > poor in health. Or they are watching more TV, etc.
Can you backup any of those three claims?
On Tuesday, October 4, 2022 at 6:20:47 PM UTC-7, Don Y wrote:
> On 10/4/2022 6:17 PM, Ed Lee wrote: > > On Tuesday, October 4, 2022 at 4:35:14 PM UTC-7, Don Y wrote: > >> On 10/4/2022 2:24 PM, Fred Bloggs wrote: > >>> : Political affiliation has emerged as a potential risk factor for > >>> COVID-19, amid evidence that > >> This is likely purely a consequence of differences in vaccination rates. > >> I.e., one could probably find a similar correlation between intelligence, > >> proactive health care, etc. > > > > Or perhaps because Republicans are richer. And rich people are generally > > poor in health. Or they are watching more TV, etc. > Can you backup any of those three claims?
No, neither can they backup political affiliation data, within 5% sampling error.
On 10/4/2022 9:17 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
> On Tuesday, October 4, 2022 at 4:35:14 PM UTC-7, Don Y wrote: >> On 10/4/2022 2:24 PM, Fred Bloggs wrote: >>> : >>> Political affiliation has emerged as a potential risk factor for COVID-19, amid evidence that >> This is likely purely a consequence of differences in vaccination rates. I.e., >> one could probably find a similar correlation between intelligence, proactive >> health care, etc. > > Or perhaps because Republicans are richer. And rich people are generally poor in health. Or they are watching more TV, etc.
???? In the US rich people have access to the best health care, and can afford the healthiest food. You can buy a two liter of pop at Wal-Mart for 98 cents, but a liter of carrot juice will run you $9 at Whole Foods. <https://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/> They don't call it "Whole Paycheck" for nothing
On Tuesday, October 4, 2022 at 6:27:32 PM UTC-7, bitrex wrote:
> On 10/4/2022 9:17 PM, Ed Lee wrote: > > On Tuesday, October 4, 2022 at 4:35:14 PM UTC-7, Don Y wrote: > >> On 10/4/2022 2:24 PM, Fred Bloggs wrote: > >>> : > >>> Political affiliation has emerged as a potential risk factor for COVID-19, amid evidence that > >> This is likely purely a consequence of differences in vaccination rates. I.e., > >> one could probably find a similar correlation between intelligence, proactive > >> health care, etc. > > > > Or perhaps because Republicans are richer. And rich people are generally poor in health. Or they are watching more TV, etc. > ???? > > In the US rich people have access to the best health care, and can > afford the healthiest food. > > You can buy a two liter of pop at Wal-Mart for 98 cents, but a liter of > carrot juice will run you $9 at Whole Foods. > > <https://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/> > > They don't call it "Whole Paycheck" for nothing
Money can't buy health all the time. If you want to be healthy, just eat carrots for 79 cents a pound. Just as healthy as carrot juice, if not better.
On Tue, 4 Oct 2022 18:17:16 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
<edward.ming.lee@gmail.com> wrote:

>On Tuesday, October 4, 2022 at 4:35:14 PM UTC-7, Don Y wrote: >> On 10/4/2022 2:24 PM, Fred Bloggs wrote: >> > : >> > Political affiliation has emerged as a potential risk factor for COVID-19, amid evidence that >> This is likely purely a consequence of differences in vaccination rates. I.e., >> one could probably find a similar correlation between intelligence, proactive >> health care, etc. > >Or perhaps because Republicans are richer. And rich people are generally poor in health. Or they are watching more TV, etc.
Conservatives are less afraid than liberals. So less likely to get vaccinated.