Forums

LCD character size

Started by Unknown March 5, 2022
On Monday, March 7, 2022 at 8:55:22 AM UTC-5, Jan Panteltje wrote:
> On a sunny day (Mon, 7 Mar 2022 01:49:28 -0800 (PST)) it happened Rick C > <gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote in > <10ffb89c-88ae-4b62...@googlegroups.com>: > >> Show us some code you wrote ror even somthing like that you build. > > > >You are learning from Larkin. > ? > >This is the last thing I designed. I didn't get to choose the display. They > >felt it was better to pick a standard display that was available from a hundred > >different sources and was very low cost. I would have used a graphic > >display where the data wasn't being shoehorned into such a limited format. > > But they are right. You will be able to get these displays even after the > >nukes rain down. But in the long run, I don't think it went anywhere. > > > >https://helpfulengineering.org/projects-news/project-spotlight-openvent-bristol/ > All I see is some numbers displayed?
Like I said, they insisted on keeping it simple as possible. They also talked about using a tablet to provide graphs as an optional extension. The UI is rather crude with only four buttons, but it works. A member of the team found software to allow simulation of the UI in a virtually identical manner to how it actually looks, or so I'm told. It required a support package that I could never get working correctly.
> >Are > >you happy or did you want to see something else? > sigh > > BTW Forth, did not know anybody was still using it. > Last time I encountered it was when I had to do fault finding in a camera system for motion > picture production. > In those days they used a camera driven by a computah above some paper with text to zoom in and out > and make special effects, the guy wrote the code in Forth. > IIRC was a hardware design error I found out, took a few minutes. > He designed the 'tronics too, was an old fellow worker of mine from the TV days, he had quit so they were left with the problems.
Yeah, Forth is great for hardware interaction, because it is interactive and can be operated from the command line. Any word (subroutine) can be tested as soon as it is written. The compilation process is so simple even large program can be compiled as fast as the file can be loaded. The development system can actually be on the target as it often uses only 8 or 12 kB. Did you use the Forth tools at all? I was playing with a TI development board and ran the development on that target from another room, using a serial port on a Raspberry Pi. I just needed a virtual connection and I could do everything I could do if sitting next to it, other than rebooting if it really messed up. I looked for a USB hub (it used a virtual com port cable) that could toggle power. They exist, but I didn't bother to get one. We need to walk around some anyway, so I used the reset as an excuse to stretch my legs. The numbers of people using Forth are dwindling. It no longer even shows up on the lists of languages. lol But as I said, it is great for interacting with hardware and debugging, so like Codewright, I keep using it. -- Rick C. --- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging --- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
On a sunny day (Mon, 7 Mar 2022 07:10:23 -0800 (PST)) it happened Rick C
<gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote in
<351735b8-0b12-4726-9a11-f8174582ccbdn@googlegroups.com>:

>On Monday, March 7, 2022 at 8:55:22 AM UTC-5, Jan Panteltje wrote: >> On a sunny day (Mon, 7 Mar 2022 01:49:28 -0800 (PST)) it happened Rick C >> ><gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote in >> <10ffb89c-88ae-4b62...@googlegroups.com>: >> >> Show us some code you wrote ror even somthing like that you build. >> > >> >You are learning from Larkin. >> ? >> >This is the last thing I designed. I didn't get to choose the display. They >> >>felt it was better to pick a standard display that was available from a hundred >> >>different sources and was very low cost. I would have used a graphic >> >display where the data wasn't being shoehorned into such a limited format. >> >> But they are right. You will be able to get these displays even after the >> >>nukes rain down. But in the long run, I don't think it went anywhere. >> > >> >https://helpfulengineering.org/projects-news/project-spotlight-openvent-bristol/ >> >All I see is some numbers displayed? > >Like I said, they insisted on keeping it simple as possible. They also talked >about using a tablet to provide graphs as an optional extension. The UI >is rather crude with only four buttons, but it works. A member of the team >found software to allow simulation of the UI in a virtually identical manner >to how it actually looks, or so I'm told. It required a support package >that I could never get working correctly. > > >> >Are >> >you happy or did you want to see something else? >> sigh >> >> BTW Forth, did not know anybody was still using it. >> Last time I encountered it was when I had to do fault finding in a camera >system for motion >> picture production. >> In those days they used a camera driven by a computah above some paper with >text to zoom in and out >> and make special effects, the guy wrote the code in Forth. >> IIRC was a hardware design error I found out, took a few minutes. >> He designed the 'tronics too, was an old fellow worker of mine from the TV >days, he had quit so they were left with the problems. > >Yeah, Forth is great for hardware interaction, because it is interactive and >can be operated from the command line. Any word (subroutine) can be tested >as soon as it is written. The compilation process is so simple even large >program can be compiled as fast as the file can be loaded. The development >system can actually be on the target as it often uses only 8 or 12 kB. > >Did >you use the Forth tools at all?
Nope, the problem was one of the motors got stuck, something with the electronics drive IIRC.
>I was playing with a TI development board and ran the development on that target >from another room, using a serial port on a Raspberry Pi. I just needed >a virtual connection and I could do everything I could do if sitting next >to it, other than rebooting if it really messed up. I looked for a USB hub >(it used a virtual com port cable) that could toggle power. They exist, >but I didn't bother to get one. We need to walk around some anyway, so I >used the reset as an excuse to stretch my legs.
I have 2 big Sitecom USB hubs in use on 2 Raspberries that also power 2 3 TB USB harddisks, one for each raspi.
>The numbers of people using Forth are dwindling. It no longer even shows up >on the lists of languages. lol But as I said, it is great for interacting >with hardware and debugging, so like Codewright, I keep using it.
I like to keep things as simple as possible ;-) was looking at some old code 33,357 lines of C total. http://panteltje.com/panteltje/subtitles/xste-3.7.lsm http://panteltje.com/panteltje/subtitles/index.html that was a lot of code for some other project.
On Monday, March 7, 2022 at 11:08:02 AM UTC-5, Jan Panteltje wrote:
> On a sunny day (Mon, 7 Mar 2022 07:10:23 -0800 (PST)) it happened Rick C > <gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote in > <351735b8-0b12-4726...@googlegroups.com>: > >On Monday, March 7, 2022 at 8:55:22 AM UTC-5, Jan Panteltje wrote: > >> On a sunny day (Mon, 7 Mar 2022 01:49:28 -0800 (PST)) it happened Rick C > >> > ><gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote in > >> <10ffb89c-88ae-4b62...@googlegroups.com>: > >> >> Show us some code you wrote ror even somthing like that you build. > >> > > >> >You are learning from Larkin. > >> ? > >> >This is the last thing I designed. I didn't get to choose the display. They > >> > >>felt it was better to pick a standard display that was available from a hundred > >> > >>different sources and was very low cost. I would have used a graphic > >> >display where the data wasn't being shoehorned into such a limited format. > >> > >> But they are right. You will be able to get these displays even after the > >> > >>nukes rain down. But in the long run, I don't think it went anywhere. > >> > > >> >https://helpfulengineering.org/projects-news/project-spotlight-openvent-bristol/ > >> > >All I see is some numbers displayed? > > > >Like I said, they insisted on keeping it simple as possible. They also talked > >about using a tablet to provide graphs as an optional extension. The UI > >is rather crude with only four buttons, but it works. A member of the team > >found software to allow simulation of the UI in a virtually identical manner > >to how it actually looks, or so I'm told. It required a support package > >that I could never get working correctly. > > > > > >> >Are > >> >you happy or did you want to see something else? > >> sigh > >> > >> BTW Forth, did not know anybody was still using it. > >> Last time I encountered it was when I had to do fault finding in a camera > >system for motion > >> picture production. > >> In those days they used a camera driven by a computah above some paper with > >text to zoom in and out > >> and make special effects, the guy wrote the code in Forth. > >> IIRC was a hardware design error I found out, took a few minutes. > >> He designed the 'tronics too, was an old fellow worker of mine from the TV > >days, he had quit so they were left with the problems. > > > >Yeah, Forth is great for hardware interaction, because it is interactive and > >can be operated from the command line. Any word (subroutine) can be tested > >as soon as it is written. The compilation process is so simple even large > >program can be compiled as fast as the file can be loaded. The development > >system can actually be on the target as it often uses only 8 or 12 kB. > > > >Did > >you use the Forth tools at all? > Nope, the problem was one of the motors got stuck, something with the electronics drive IIRC.
Yes, I got that, but I thought you might have used the Forth command line to debug the problem.
> >I was playing with a TI development board and ran the development on that target > >from another room, using a serial port on a Raspberry Pi. I just needed > >a virtual connection and I could do everything I could do if sitting next > >to it, other than rebooting if it really messed up. I looked for a USB hub > >(it used a virtual com port cable) that could toggle power. They exist, > >but I didn't bother to get one. We need to walk around some anyway, so I > >used the reset as an excuse to stretch my legs. > I have 2 big Sitecom USB hubs in use on 2 Raspberries that also power 2 3 TB USB harddisks, > one for each raspi.
Do either one allow power control through the USB port? I expect you don't need that with drives.
> >The numbers of people using Forth are dwindling. It no longer even shows up > >on the lists of languages. lol But as I said, it is great for interacting > >with hardware and debugging, so like Codewright, I keep using it. > I like to keep things as simple as possible ;-) > was looking at some old code > 33,357 lines of C total. > http://panteltje.com/panteltje/subtitles/xste-3.7.lsm > http://panteltje.com/panteltje/subtitles/index.html > that was a lot of code for some other project.
Yes, 33,000 lines of code is a lot. One of the concepts used in Forth is modularization of the code in ways that result in the code being much smaller, both the source and the executable. Like I said, it's not uncommon to be able to install Forth onto the target in as little as 8 kB of Flash. -- Rick C. --+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging --+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
On a sunny day (Mon, 7 Mar 2022 08:43:59 -0800 (PST)) it happened Rick C
<gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote in
<261e2f24-04a7-46be-b014-726093d71e4fn@googlegroups.com>:

>On Monday, March 7, 2022 at 11:08:02 AM UTC-5, Jan Panteltje wrote: >> On a sunny day (Mon, 7 Mar 2022 07:10:23 -0800 (PST)) it happened Rick C >> ><gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote in >> <351735b8-0b12-4726...@googlegroups.com>: >> >On Monday, March 7, 2022 at 8:55:22 AM UTC-5, Jan Panteltje wrote: >> >> On a sunny day (Mon, 7 Mar 2022 01:49:28 -0800 (PST)) it happened Rick >C >> >> >> ><gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote in >> >> <10ffb89c-88ae-4b62...@googlegroups.com>: >> >> >> Show us some code you wrote ror even somthing like that you build. >> >>> > >> >> >You are learning from Larkin. >> >> ? >> >> >This is the last thing I designed. I didn't get to choose the display. >They >> >> >> >>felt it was better to pick a standard display that was available from a >hundred >> >> >> >>different sources and was very low cost. I would have used a graphic >> >> >display where the data wasn't being shoehorned into such a limited format. >> >>> >> >> But they are right. You will be able to get these displays even after the >> >>> >> >>nukes rain down. But in the long run, I don't think it went anywhere. >> >>> > >> >> >https://helpfulengineering.org/projects-news/project-spotlight-openvent-bristol/ >> >>> >> >All I see is some numbers displayed? >> > >> >Like I said, they insisted on keeping it simple as possible. They also talked >> >>about using a tablet to provide graphs as an optional extension. The UI >> >>is rather crude with only four buttons, but it works. A member of the team >> >>found software to allow simulation of the UI in a virtually identical manner >> >>to how it actually looks, or so I'm told. It required a support package >> >>that I could never get working correctly. >> > >> > >> >> >Are >> >> >you happy or did you want to see something else? >> >> sigh >> >> >> >> BTW Forth, did not know anybody was still using it. >> >> Last time I encountered it was when I had to do fault finding in a camera >> >>system for motion >> >> picture production. >> >> In those days they used a camera driven by a computah above some paper >with >> >text to zoom in and out >> >> and make special effects, the guy wrote the code in Forth. >> >> IIRC was a hardware design error I found out, took a few minutes. >> >> He designed the 'tronics too, was an old fellow worker of mine from the >TV >> >days, he had quit so they were left with the problems. >> > >> >Yeah, Forth is great for hardware interaction, because it is interactive >and >> >can be operated from the command line. Any word (subroutine) can be tested >> >>as soon as it is written. The compilation process is so simple even large >> >>program can be compiled as fast as the file can be loaded. The development >> >>system can actually be on the target as it often uses only 8 or 12 kB. >> >> >> >Did >> >you use the Forth tools at all? >> Nope, the problem was one of the motors got stuck, something with the electronics >drive IIRC. > >Yes, I got that, but I thought you might have used the Forth command line to >debug the problem. > > >> >I was playing with a TI development board and ran the development on that >target >> >from another room, using a serial port on a Raspberry Pi. I just needed >> >>a virtual connection and I could do everything I could do if sitting next >> >>to it, other than rebooting if it really messed up. I looked for a USB hub >> >>(it used a virtual com port cable) that could toggle power. They exist, >> >>but I didn't bother to get one. We need to walk around some anyway, so I >> >>used the reset as an excuse to stretch my legs. >> I have 2 big Sitecom USB hubs in use on 2 Raspberries that also power 2 3 >TB USB harddisks, >> one for each raspi. > >Do either one allow power control through the USB port? I expect you don't >need that with drives.
Well the USB hubs each run on a wallwart, so unplug it and power is off? You can also power the raspi from it, or from its own wallwart.
> >> >The numbers of people using Forth are dwindling. It no longer even shows >up >> >on the lists of languages. lol But as I said, it is great for interacting >> >>with hardware and debugging, so like Codewright, I keep using it. >> I like to keep things as simple as possible ;-) >> was looking at some old code >> 33,357 lines of C total. >> http://panteltje.com/panteltje/subtitles/xste-3.7.lsm >> http://panteltje.com/panteltje/subtitles/index.html >> that was a lot of code for some other project. > >Yes, 33,000 lines of code is a lot. One of the concepts used in Forth is modularization >of the code in ways that result in the code being much smaller, >both the source and the executable. Like I said, it's not uncommon to be >able to install Forth onto the target in as little as 8 kB of Flash.
All that PIC code for 18F14K22 and smaller PICs fits in less than 8 kB even the pic scope does (was full that is where I stopped adding stuff). All depends what it has to do! It helps a lot not to have to link in huge libraries, IF you can write that code yourself. World is full of bloat... Bloat sells (hardware too, Microsoft deep state sort of thing, updates need more net speed).
On Monday, March 7, 2022 at 12:23:40 PM UTC-5, Jan Panteltje wrote:
> On a sunny day (Mon, 7 Mar 2022 08:43:59 -0800 (PST)) it happened Rick C > <gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote in > <261e2f24-04a7-46be...@googlegroups.com>: > >On Monday, March 7, 2022 at 11:08:02 AM UTC-5, Jan Panteltje wrote: > >> On a sunny day (Mon, 7 Mar 2022 07:10:23 -0800 (PST)) it happened Rick C > >> > ><gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote in > >> <351735b8-0b12-4726...@googlegroups.com>: > >> >On Monday, March 7, 2022 at 8:55:22 AM UTC-5, Jan Panteltje wrote: > >> >> On a sunny day (Mon, 7 Mar 2022 01:49:28 -0800 (PST)) it happened Rick > >C > >> >> > >> ><gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote in > >> >> <10ffb89c-88ae-4b62...@googlegroups.com>: > >> >> >> Show us some code you wrote ror even somthing like that you build. > >> > >>> > > >> >> >You are learning from Larkin. > >> >> ? > >> >> >This is the last thing I designed. I didn't get to choose the display. > >They > >> >> > >> >>felt it was better to pick a standard display that was available from a > >hundred > >> >> > >> >>different sources and was very low cost. I would have used a graphic > >> >> >display where the data wasn't being shoehorned into such a limited format. > >> > >>> > >> >> But they are right. You will be able to get these displays even after the > >> > >>> > >> >>nukes rain down. But in the long run, I don't think it went anywhere. > >> > >>> > > >> >> >https://helpfulengineering.org/projects-news/project-spotlight-openvent-bristol/ > >> > >>> > >> >All I see is some numbers displayed? > >> > > >> >Like I said, they insisted on keeping it simple as possible. They also talked > >> > >>about using a tablet to provide graphs as an optional extension. The UI > >> > >>is rather crude with only four buttons, but it works. A member of the team > >> > >>found software to allow simulation of the UI in a virtually identical manner > >> > >>to how it actually looks, or so I'm told. It required a support package > >> > >>that I could never get working correctly. > >> > > >> > > >> >> >Are > >> >> >you happy or did you want to see something else? > >> >> sigh > >> >> > >> >> BTW Forth, did not know anybody was still using it. > >> >> Last time I encountered it was when I had to do fault finding in a camera > >> > >>system for motion > >> >> picture production. > >> >> In those days they used a camera driven by a computah above some paper > >with > >> >text to zoom in and out > >> >> and make special effects, the guy wrote the code in Forth. > >> >> IIRC was a hardware design error I found out, took a few minutes. > >> >> He designed the 'tronics too, was an old fellow worker of mine from the > >TV > >> >days, he had quit so they were left with the problems. > >> > > >> >Yeah, Forth is great for hardware interaction, because it is interactive > >and > >> >can be operated from the command line. Any word (subroutine) can be tested > >> > >>as soon as it is written. The compilation process is so simple even large > >> > >>program can be compiled as fast as the file can be loaded. The development > >> > >>system can actually be on the target as it often uses only 8 or 12 kB. > >> > >> > >> >Did > >> >you use the Forth tools at all? > >> Nope, the problem was one of the motors got stuck, something with the electronics > >drive IIRC. > > > >Yes, I got that, but I thought you might have used the Forth command line to > >debug the problem. > > > > > >> >I was playing with a TI development board and ran the development on that > >target > >> >from another room, using a serial port on a Raspberry Pi. I just needed > >> > >>a virtual connection and I could do everything I could do if sitting next > >> > >>to it, other than rebooting if it really messed up. I looked for a USB hub > >> > >>(it used a virtual com port cable) that could toggle power. They exist, > >> > >>but I didn't bother to get one. We need to walk around some anyway, so I > >> > >>used the reset as an excuse to stretch my legs. > >> I have 2 big Sitecom USB hubs in use on 2 Raspberries that also power 2 3 > >TB USB harddisks, > >> one for each raspi. > > > >Do either one allow power control through the USB port? I expect you don't > >need that with drives. > Well the USB hubs each run on a wallwart, so unplug it and power is off? > You can also power the raspi from it, or from its own wallwart.
Yeah, you aren't getting the idea of "remote".
> >> >The numbers of people using Forth are dwindling. It no longer even shows > >up > >> >on the lists of languages. lol But as I said, it is great for interacting > >> > >>with hardware and debugging, so like Codewright, I keep using it. > >> I like to keep things as simple as possible ;-) > >> was looking at some old code > >> 33,357 lines of C total. > >> http://panteltje.com/panteltje/subtitles/xste-3.7.lsm > >> http://panteltje.com/panteltje/subtitles/index.html > >> that was a lot of code for some other project. > > > >Yes, 33,000 lines of code is a lot. One of the concepts used in Forth is modularization > >of the code in ways that result in the code being much smaller, > >both the source and the executable. Like I said, it's not uncommon to be > >able to install Forth onto the target in as little as 8 kB of Flash. > All that PIC code for 18F14K22 and smaller PICs fits in less than 8 kB > even the pic scope does (was full that is where I stopped adding stuff). > All depends what it has to do! > > It helps a lot not to have to link in huge libraries, IF you can write that code yourself. > World is full of bloat... > Bloat sells (hardware too, Microsoft deep state sort of thing, updates need more net speed).
Ok, thanks for your input. -- Rick C. -+- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging -+- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
Jan Panteltje <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:
> On a sunny day (Sat, 05 Mar 2022 11:25:36 -0800) it happened > jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in > <4cd72hleqqcmvfjmkevjqqaj6isv15tah7@4ax.com>: > >>We're designing a new rackmount box, basicly a fancy power supply, >>with an 800x480 4.3" LCD on the front. Roughly this: >> >>https://www.dropbox.com/s/8ubv5if7cbnsjzn/P940-8_front.jpg?raw=1 >> >>Does anyone have an estimate of how many characters X and Y we might >>use? We'll try to fire it up next week and experiment, but I'd like to >>start thinking about screen layouts and have no idea about what might >>be reasonable. We'd want good visibility so wouldn't want anything >>really tiny. >> >>I'd prefer a fixed-size, fixed-pitch font, to keep the design simple. >>We might have some characters/boxes with different background colors. >> >>The off-screen (mechanical) pushbuttons will be page left/right and >>cursor up/dn/left/right, and a spinner knob. There will be some box >>overhead pages and one page per plugin board. > > If you do not need graphics then that resolution is probably overkill > > 128x64 LCD: > http://panteltje.com/pub/gamma_soectrometer_IMG_4505.JPG > > 640x480 same font... > http://panteltje.com/pub/xvtx-p.gif > > Make a drawing to size first? > > There are a million fonts to chose from, some are free. > Some LCDs have their own character set. > Does it run an OS? Linux Xwindows has many fonts
All of which suck.
On a sunny day (Fri, 11 Mar 2022 17:06:40 -0000 (UTC)) it happened Cydrome
Leader <presence@MUNGEpanix.com> wrote in <t0fviv$e7t$1@reader1.panix.com>:

>Jan Panteltje <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> 128x64 LCD: >> http://panteltje.com/pub/gamma_soectrometer_IMG_4505.JPG >> >> 640x480 same font... >> http://panteltje.com/pub/xvtx-p.gif >> >> Make a drawing to size first? >> >> There are a million fonts to chose from, some are free. >> Some LCDs have their own character set. >> Does it run an OS? Linux Xwindows has many fonts > >All of which suck.
Maybe read this: https://twiserandom.com/unix/x11-fonts-a-tutorial/index.html xlsfonts here shows 10,598 fonts installed on my laptop by default. Have you tried them all? And that is on an 11 year old Slackware install: uname -a Linux panteltje20 2.6.37.6 #3 SMP Sat Apr 9 22:49:32 CDT 2011 x86_64 Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-2430M CPU @ 2.40GHz GenuineIntel GNU/Linux Anyways just finished some X11 code for 2 applications that now compile both on X86 and ARM (Raspberry Pi4). Dropped libXt, no longer needed, only using libX11 Faster and better. No more Imake files, just a simple Makefile. And portable to almost any system. Here is one: http://panteltje.com/panteltje/newsflex/download.html#xflir Your turn to show us something or STFU. :=)
On Friday, March 11, 2022 at 12:21:44 PM UTC-5, Jan Panteltje wrote:
> On a sunny day (Fri, 11 Mar 2022 17:06:40 -0000 (UTC)) it happened Cydrome > Leader <pres...@MUNGEpanix.com> wrote in <t0fviv$e7t$1...@reader1.panix.com>: > >Jan Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote: > > >> 128x64 LCD: > >> http://panteltje.com/pub/gamma_soectrometer_IMG_4505.JPG > >> > >> 640x480 same font... > >> http://panteltje.com/pub/xvtx-p.gif > >> > >> Make a drawing to size first? > >> > >> There are a million fonts to chose from, some are free. > >> Some LCDs have their own character set. > >> Does it run an OS? Linux Xwindows has many fonts > > > >All of which suck. > Maybe read this: > https://twiserandom.com/unix/x11-fonts-a-tutorial/index.html > > xlsfonts > here shows 10,598 fonts installed on my laptop by default. > > Have you tried them all? > > And that is on an 11 year old Slackware install: > uname -a > Linux panteltje20 2.6.37.6 #3 SMP Sat Apr 9 22:49:32 CDT 2011 x86_64 Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-2430M CPU @ 2.40GHz GenuineIntel GNU/Linux > > Anyways just finished some X11 code for 2 applications that now compile both on X86 and ARM (Raspberry Pi4). > Dropped libXt, no longer needed, only using libX11 > Faster and better. > No more Imake files, just a simple Makefile. > And portable to almost any system. > Here is one: > http://panteltje.com/panteltje/newsflex/download.html#xflir > > Your turn to show us something or STFU. > :=)
You sound like a 10 year old when you post such challenges. I expect that from the likes of Larkin. I don't get why you would even respond to such a pointless post as his. Then again, I don't know why I am responding to a pointless post as yours... I'm just sayin'. -- Rick C. -++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging -++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
On a sunny day (Fri, 11 Mar 2022 09:57:38 -0800 (PST)) it happened Rick C
<gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote in
<ed1acb18-0714-4788-a516-ee45b74f57a6n@googlegroups.com>:

>On Friday, March 11, 2022 at 12:21:44 PM UTC-5, Jan Panteltje wrote: >> On a sunny day (Fri, 11 Mar 2022 17:06:40 -0000 (UTC)) it happened Cydrome >> Leader <pres...@MUNGEpanix.com> wrote in <t0fviv$e7t$1...@reader1.panix.com>: >> >Jan Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote: >> >> >> 128x64 LCD: >> >> http://panteltje.com/pub/gamma_soectrometer_IMG_4505.JPG >> >> >> >> 640x480 same font... >> >> http://panteltje.com/pub/xvtx-p.gif >> >> >> >> Make a drawing to size first? >> >> >> >> There are a million fonts to chose from, some are free. >> >> Some LCDs have their own character set. >> >> Does it run an OS? Linux Xwindows has many fonts >> > >> >All of which suck. >> Maybe read this: >> https://twiserandom.com/unix/x11-fonts-a-tutorial/index.html >> >> xlsfonts >> here shows 10,598 fonts installed on my laptop by default. >> >> Have you tried them all? >> >> And that is on an 11 year old Slackware install: >> uname -a >> Linux panteltje20 2.6.37.6 #3 SMP Sat Apr 9 22:49:32 CDT 2011 x86_64 Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-2430M CPU @ 2.40GHz GenuineIntel >> GNU/Linux >> >> Anyways just finished some X11 code for 2 applications that now compile both on X86 and ARM (Raspberry Pi4). >> Dropped libXt, no longer needed, only using libX11 >> Faster and better. >> No more Imake files, just a simple Makefile. >> And portable to almost any system. >> Here is one: >> http://panteltje.com/panteltje/newsflex/download.html#xflir >> >> Your turn to show us something or STFU. >> :=) > >You sound like a 10 year old when you post such challenges. I expect that from the likes of Larkin. I don't get why you would >even respond to such a pointless post as his. > >Then again, I don't know why I am responding to a pointless post as yours... I'm just sayin'.
You could bother to read the link I gave as a pointED answer Just babbking here to spread advertizing to get free miles for your 'lectric vehicle does not teach anybody anything.
On Friday, March 11, 2022 at 1:53:38 PM UTC-5, Jan Panteltje wrote:
> On a sunny day (Fri, 11 Mar 2022 09:57:38 -0800 (PST)) it happened Rick C > <gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote in > <ed1acb18-0714-4788...@googlegroups.com>: > >On Friday, March 11, 2022 at 12:21:44 PM UTC-5, Jan Panteltje wrote: > >> On a sunny day (Fri, 11 Mar 2022 17:06:40 -0000 (UTC)) it happened Cydrome > >> Leader <pres...@MUNGEpanix.com> wrote in <t0fviv$e7t$1...@reader1.panix.com>: > >> >Jan Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote: > >> > >> >> 128x64 LCD: > >> >> http://panteltje.com/pub/gamma_soectrometer_IMG_4505.JPG > >> >> > >> >> 640x480 same font... > >> >> http://panteltje.com/pub/xvtx-p.gif > >> >> > >> >> Make a drawing to size first? > >> >> > >> >> There are a million fonts to chose from, some are free. > >> >> Some LCDs have their own character set. > >> >> Does it run an OS? Linux Xwindows has many fonts > >> > > >> >All of which suck. > >> Maybe read this: > >> https://twiserandom.com/unix/x11-fonts-a-tutorial/index.html > >> > >> xlsfonts > >> here shows 10,598 fonts installed on my laptop by default. > >> > >> Have you tried them all? > >> > >> And that is on an 11 year old Slackware install: > >> uname -a > >> Linux panteltje20 2.6.37.6 #3 SMP Sat Apr 9 22:49:32 CDT 2011 x86_64 Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-2430M CPU @ 2.40GHz GenuineIntel > >> GNU/Linux > >> > >> Anyways just finished some X11 code for 2 applications that now compile both on X86 and ARM (Raspberry Pi4). > >> Dropped libXt, no longer needed, only using libX11 > >> Faster and better. > >> No more Imake files, just a simple Makefile. > >> And portable to almost any system. > >> Here is one: > >> http://panteltje.com/panteltje/newsflex/download.html#xflir > >> > >> Your turn to show us something or STFU. > >> :=) > > > >You sound like a 10 year old when you post such challenges. I expect that from the likes of Larkin. I don't get why you would > >even respond to such a pointless post as his. > > > >Then again, I don't know why I am responding to a pointless post as yours... I'm just sayin'. > You could bother to read the link I gave > as a pointED answer > Just babbking here to spread advertizing to get free miles for your 'lectric vehicle does not teach anybody anything.
No, just more BS. You do the same thing as many others here. You make noises about discussing technical stuff, but your posts here are now just ego trips and BS. You didn't post the like so you could discuss anything. You posted it so you could follow it up with "STFU" to Cydrome. I don't really care. I just find it humorous when people climb up on high horses to claim they are doing the right thing and others are not. Whatever. It's s.e.d Jake. -- Rick C. +-- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging +-- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209