Forums

review this battery charger

Started by Cydrome Leader December 20, 2021
What do you folks think about this gem:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpaWCedoptA

I like the special high reluctance transformer and kindling used as 
insulation.


tirsdag den 21. december 2021 kl. 04.16.48 UTC+1 skrev Cydrome Leader:
> What do you folks think about this gem: > > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpaWCedoptA > > I like the special high reluctance transformer and kindling used as > insulation.
need a welder? https://youtu.be/2bC0Vmy3niA
On Tuesday, 21 December 2021 at 04:05:42 UTC, Sylvia Else wrote:
> On 21-Dec-21 2:16 pm, Cydrome Leader wrote: > > What do you folks think about this gem: > > > > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpaWCedoptA > > > > I like the special high reluctance transformer and kindling used as > > insulation. > > > > > No Earth. > > Joining wires by twisting alone is asking for a fire. > > Sylvia.
They did solder the connection to the rectifier diode. I thought it was quite impressive. A lot of thought had gone into the design and it certainly made good use of recycled materials. John
On Tue, 21 Dec 2021 02:50:33 -0800 (PST), John Walliker
<jrwalliker@gmail.com> wrote:

>On Tuesday, 21 December 2021 at 04:05:42 UTC, Sylvia Else wrote: >> On 21-Dec-21 2:16 pm, Cydrome Leader wrote: >> > What do you folks think about this gem: >> > >> > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpaWCedoptA >> > >> > I like the special high reluctance transformer and kindling used as >> > insulation. >> > >> > >> No Earth. >> >> Joining wires by twisting alone is asking for a fire. >> >> Sylvia. > >They did solder the connection to the rectifier diode. I thought it >was quite impressive. A lot of thought had gone into the design >and it certainly made good use of recycled materials. > >John
Besides the craft paper substitution, what made you think that the materials were recycled? Repurposed, maybe. RL
On Tuesday, 21 December 2021 at 15:16:25 UTC, legg wrote:
> On Tue, 21 Dec 2021 02:50:33 -0800 (PST), John Walliker > <jrwal...@gmail.com> wrote: > > >On Tuesday, 21 December 2021 at 04:05:42 UTC, Sylvia Else wrote: > >> On 21-Dec-21 2:16 pm, Cydrome Leader wrote: > >> > What do you folks think about this gem: > >> > > >> > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpaWCedoptA > >> > > >> > I like the special high reluctance transformer and kindling used as > >> > insulation. > >> > > >> > > >> No Earth. > >> > >> Joining wires by twisting alone is asking for a fire. > >> > >> Sylvia. > > > >They did solder the connection to the rectifier diode. I thought it > >was quite impressive. A lot of thought had gone into the design > >and it certainly made good use of recycled materials. > > > >John > Besides the craft paper substitution, what made you think that > the materials were recycled? Repurposed, maybe. > > RL
That is what I was mainly thinking of. The core looked as if it might have been intended for some other purpose. I suppose the rust and grime on the laminations are good for reducing eddy currents. It did seem surprising that the guillotine operator appeared to have all his fingers. The diode heatsink casting might well have been recycled aluminium floor sweepings John
On Tuesday, December 21, 2021 at 5:24:50 PM UTC, John Walliker wrote:
> On Tuesday, 21 December 2021 at 15:16:25 UTC, legg wrote: > > On Tue, 21 Dec 2021 02:50:33 -0800 (PST), John Walliker > > <jrwal...@gmail.com> wrote: > > > > >On Tuesday, 21 December 2021 at 04:05:42 UTC, Sylvia Else wrote: > > >> On 21-Dec-21 2:16 pm, Cydrome Leader wrote: > > >> > What do you folks think about this gem: > > >> > > > >> > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpaWCedoptA > > >> > > > >> > I like the special high reluctance transformer and kindling used as > > >> > insulation. > > >> > > > >> > > > >> No Earth. > > >> > > >> Joining wires by twisting alone is asking for a fire. > > >> > > >> Sylvia. > > > > > >They did solder the connection to the rectifier diode. I thought it > > >was quite impressive. A lot of thought had gone into the design > > >and it certainly made good use of recycled materials. > > > > > >John > > Besides the craft paper substitution, what made you think that > > the materials were recycled? Repurposed, maybe. > > > > RL > That is what I was mainly thinking of. The core looked as if it might > have been intended for some other purpose. I suppose the rust and > grime on the laminations are good for reducing eddy currents. It did > seem surprising that the guillotine operator appeared to have all his > fingers. The diode heatsink casting might well have been recycled > aluminium floor sweepings > > John
I'm most struck by their work practices. Working on cracked concrete floor, no tables or chairs. I realize some cultural ethic may be a factor, but ergonomics & safety are "universal". Also, strange that they have some hand tools, like pliers, but no wire cutters (scissors is a painful way to cut wire!) or rubber mallet. And they have some power tools like the drill press and circular saw, but no electric or pneumatic screw/nut drivers, riveters, etc. And a sheet metal shear. I wonder if electricity there is a premium? Karachi is the capital city, but I would think, make electricity as available as possible for business-sector development. They might do well to host a manufacturing engineering consultant for a few days.
Rich S <richsulinengineer@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Tuesday, December 21, 2021 at 5:24:50 PM UTC, John Walliker wrote: >> On Tuesday, 21 December 2021 at 15:16:25 UTC, legg wrote: >> > On Tue, 21 Dec 2021 02:50:33 -0800 (PST), John Walliker >> > <jrwal...@gmail.com> wrote: >> > >> > >On Tuesday, 21 December 2021 at 04:05:42 UTC, Sylvia Else wrote: >> > >> On 21-Dec-21 2:16 pm, Cydrome Leader wrote: >> > >> > What do you folks think about this gem: >> > >> > >> > >> > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpaWCedoptA >> > >> > >> > >> > I like the special high reluctance transformer and kindling used as >> > >> > insulation. >> > >> > >> > >> > >> > >> No Earth. >> > >> >> > >> Joining wires by twisting alone is asking for a fire. >> > >> >> > >> Sylvia. >> > > >> > >They did solder the connection to the rectifier diode. I thought it >> > >was quite impressive. A lot of thought had gone into the design >> > >and it certainly made good use of recycled materials. >> > > >> > >John >> > Besides the craft paper substitution, what made you think that >> > the materials were recycled? Repurposed, maybe. >> > >> > RL >> That is what I was mainly thinking of. The core looked as if it might >> have been intended for some other purpose. I suppose the rust and >> grime on the laminations are good for reducing eddy currents. It did >> seem surprising that the guillotine operator appeared to have all his >> fingers. The diode heatsink casting might well have been recycled >> aluminium floor sweepings >> >> John > > I'm most struck by their work practices. Working on cracked concrete > floor, no tables or chairs. I realize some cultural ethic may be a > factor, but ergonomics & safety are "universal". Also, strange that > they have some hand tools, like pliers, but no wire cutters (scissors > is a painful way to cut wire!) or rubber mallet. And they have some > power tools like the drill press and circular saw, but no electric or > pneumatic screw/nut drivers, riveters, etc. And a sheet metal shear. > I wonder if electricity there is a premium? Karachi is the capital city, > but I would think, make electricity as available as possible for > business-sector development. They might do well to host a > manufacturing engineering consultant for a few days.
The third-world manufacturing videos are fascinating. It looks like people spending half their time throwing parts on the ground, and the rest of the time picking then back up again. It makes very little sense, but might explain why those places are such dumps to start with.
On Thursday, 23 December 2021 at 18:23:19 UTC, Rich S wrote:
> On Tuesday, December 21, 2021 at 5:24:50 PM UTC, John Walliker wrote: > > On Tuesday, 21 December 2021 at 15:16:25 UTC, legg wrote: > > > On Tue, 21 Dec 2021 02:50:33 -0800 (PST), John Walliker > > > <jrwal...@gmail.com> wrote: > > > > > > >On Tuesday, 21 December 2021 at 04:05:42 UTC, Sylvia Else wrote: > > > >> On 21-Dec-21 2:16 pm, Cydrome Leader wrote: > > > >> > What do you folks think about this gem: > > > >> > > > > >> > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpaWCedoptA > > > >> > > > > >> > I like the special high reluctance transformer and kindling used as > > > >> > insulation. > > > >> > > > > >> > > > > >> No Earth. > > > >> > > > >> Joining wires by twisting alone is asking for a fire. > > > >> > > > >> Sylvia. > > > > > > > >They did solder the connection to the rectifier diode. I thought it > > > >was quite impressive. A lot of thought had gone into the design > > > >and it certainly made good use of recycled materials. > > > > > > > >John > > > Besides the craft paper substitution, what made you think that > > > the materials were recycled? Repurposed, maybe. > > > > > > RL > > That is what I was mainly thinking of. The core looked as if it might > > have been intended for some other purpose. I suppose the rust and > > grime on the laminations are good for reducing eddy currents. It did > > seem surprising that the guillotine operator appeared to have all his > > fingers. The diode heatsink casting might well have been recycled > > aluminium floor sweepings > > > > John > I'm most struck by their work practices. Working on cracked concrete > floor, no tables or chairs. I realize some cultural ethic may be a > factor, but ergonomics & safety are "universal". Also, strange that > they have some hand tools, like pliers, but no wire cutters (scissors > is a painful way to cut wire!) or rubber mallet. And they have some > power tools like the drill press and circular saw, but no electric or > pneumatic screw/nut drivers, riveters, etc. And a sheet metal shear. > I wonder if electricity there is a premium? Karachi is the capital city, > but I would think, make electricity as available as possible for > business-sector development. They might do well to host a > manufacturing engineering consultant for a few days.
I'm sure they could teach a consultant more than the consultant could teach them. I would want to use a pushsstick though on that guillotine. The wire isn't copper colour. I can't imagine them paying unnecessarily for plating. It's not iron wire is it? :)
In article <738a69b8-f526-42cc-b396-490c37a33918n@googlegroups.com>, 
tabbypurr@gmail.com says...
> I'm sure they could teach a consultant more than the consultant could teach them. I would want to use a pushsstick though on that guillotine. > > The wire isn't copper colour. I can't imagine them paying unnecessarily for plating. It's not iron wire is it? :) > >
I did not watch the whole thing,but if they did not solder but crimped or screwed the connections it may have been Aluminum wire. Lots of wire comming from China seems to be aluminum with a plating of copper. Real crappy way for them to do things to cut the cost. Fine for high frequencies like radio and tv, but not for DC or low frequency AC as house wiring or drop cords. YOU have to go up a couple of wire sizes to carry the same current.
Tabby <tabbypurr@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Thursday, 23 December 2021 at 18:23:19 UTC, Rich S wrote: >> On Tuesday, December 21, 2021 at 5:24:50 PM UTC, John Walliker wrote: >> > On Tuesday, 21 December 2021 at 15:16:25 UTC, legg wrote: >> > > On Tue, 21 Dec 2021 02:50:33 -0800 (PST), John Walliker >> > > <jrwal...@gmail.com> wrote: >> > > >> > > >On Tuesday, 21 December 2021 at 04:05:42 UTC, Sylvia Else wrote: >> > > >> On 21-Dec-21 2:16 pm, Cydrome Leader wrote: >> > > >> > What do you folks think about this gem: >> > > >> > >> > > >> > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpaWCedoptA >> > > >> > >> > > >> > I like the special high reluctance transformer and kindling used as >> > > >> > insulation. >> > > >> > >> > > >> > >> > > >> No Earth. >> > > >> >> > > >> Joining wires by twisting alone is asking for a fire. >> > > >> >> > > >> Sylvia. >> > > > >> > > >They did solder the connection to the rectifier diode. I thought it >> > > >was quite impressive. A lot of thought had gone into the design >> > > >and it certainly made good use of recycled materials. >> > > > >> > > >John >> > > Besides the craft paper substitution, what made you think that >> > > the materials were recycled? Repurposed, maybe. >> > > >> > > RL >> > That is what I was mainly thinking of. The core looked as if it might >> > have been intended for some other purpose. I suppose the rust and >> > grime on the laminations are good for reducing eddy currents. It did >> > seem surprising that the guillotine operator appeared to have all his >> > fingers. The diode heatsink casting might well have been recycled >> > aluminium floor sweepings >> > >> > John >> I'm most struck by their work practices. Working on cracked concrete >> floor, no tables or chairs. I realize some cultural ethic may be a >> factor, but ergonomics & safety are "universal". Also, strange that >> they have some hand tools, like pliers, but no wire cutters (scissors >> is a painful way to cut wire!) or rubber mallet. And they have some >> power tools like the drill press and circular saw, but no electric or >> pneumatic screw/nut drivers, riveters, etc. And a sheet metal shear. >> I wonder if electricity there is a premium? Karachi is the capital city, >> but I would think, make electricity as available as possible for >> business-sector development. They might do well to host a >> manufacturing engineering consultant for a few days. > > I'm sure they could teach a consultant more than the consultant could teach them. I would want to use a pushsstick though on that guillotine. > > The wire isn't copper colour. I can't imagine them paying unnecessarily for plating. It's not iron wire is it? :)
It looked like cloth covered wire for the transformer. I can't imagine that's cheaper than varnish, but maybe there's another shop where they twist it on by hand.