Forums

Anyone hear of a 120V clothes dryer?

Started by Rick C October 4, 2021
The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet.  It's also on an extension cord.  Anyone see anything like that before?  

I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 degrees.  Still, those aren't very high current.  

-- 

Rick C.

- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209 
Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote in
news:a57233da-6577-4a8e-a705-32e23340cea6n@googlegroups.com: 

> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also > on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? > > I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as > a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 > degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. >
That would be a 240V outlet and if it is only wired 120V it is wrong. Wait... same size? Sounds like "medical grade" or such. They had a higher current rating. But hospital gadgetry has gotten far more efficient and less power consumptive, so "Hospital Grade" is just a way for the makers of those connectors to suck more money out of a certain demographic, like "medical use". They have now gone full COTS and there are computer carts they use now to run around from office to office taking vitals and other data. Like a Nurse's assistant thing. So most of the outlets I have seen in rooms are standard 120V, likely GFCI.
Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote:
> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? > > I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current.
Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. I expect things like that not to be common in the USA, where people usually don't care about energy consumption. But maybe when you really need to connect something to a 120V socket, it would be a good option. (we don't have that issue here as we have 230V and can draw 2500-3500W from a standard outlet)
On 04-Oct-21 7:27 pm, Rob wrote:
> Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote: >> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? >> >> I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. > > Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping > instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so > they could easily work from a standard 120V socket.
They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. Sylvia.
Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid> wrote:
> On 04-Oct-21 7:27 pm, Rob wrote: >> Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote: >>> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? >>> >>> I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. >> >> Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping >> instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so >> they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. > > They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. > > Sylvia.
They cost like 300 euro more, which we save on electricity costs in about 4 years. Not a stunning economic difference, but you know what? In Europe we do consider the environment, and are not only watching pennies as a decisiion criterium when buying energy wasting equipment. Maybe in the US you should start doing that too!
On Monday, 4 October 2021 at 10:36:08 UTC+1, Rob wrote:
> Sylvia Else <syl...@email.invalid> wrote: > > On 04-Oct-21 7:27 pm, Rob wrote: > >> Rick C <gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote: > >>> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? > >>> > >>> I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. > >> > >> Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping > >> instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so > >> they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. > > > > They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. > > > > Sylvia. > They cost like 300 euro more, which we save on electricity costs in > about 4 years. > > Not a stunning economic difference, but you know what? In Europe we > do consider the environment, and are not only watching pennies as > a decisiion criterium when buying energy wasting equipment. > > Maybe in the US you should start doing that too!
Heat pump machines are an improvement. More sensible is just a fan, dries things overnight, costs far less to buy & run, consumes no space.
 Sylvia Else wrote:
==============
 > 
> > Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping > > instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so > > they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. > > They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. >
** Plenty to be found in Australia too. Big advantage in premises with limited electric power available. Ordinary clothes driers push single phase ccts to their limit. ...... Phil
Tabby wrote:
==========
> > Heat pump machines are an improvement. > More sensible is just a fan, dries things overnight, > costs far less to buy & run, consumes no space. >
** Ha ha, do exactly that when the weather is rainy myself. Just string a few metres of line up and blow right down it with an 80W pedestal fan. Otherwise, direct solar energy ( plus wind) is free and amasingly effective... ...... Phil
On 10/4/2021 2:36 AM, Rob wrote:
> Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid> wrote: >> On 04-Oct-21 7:27 pm, Rob wrote: >>> Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote: >>>> The dryer here seems to be plugged into a 120V outlet. It's also on an extension cord. Anyone see anything like that before? >>>> >>>> I suppose it's actually a 240V connector which is the same size as a standard 120V connector but having one or more pins turned 90 degrees. Still, those aren't very high current. >>> >>> Over here in Europe we have clothes dryers that use heat pumping >>> instead of electric heating. They use like 700-1000W of power so >>> they could easily work from a standard 120V socket. >> >> They no doubt save energy, but at what cost? They don't sound economic. > > They cost like 300 euro more, which we save on electricity costs in > about 4 years. > > Not a stunning economic difference, but you know what? In Europe we > do consider the environment, and are not only watching pennies as > a decisiion criterium when buying energy wasting equipment. > > Maybe in the US you should start doing that too!
My "inexpensive" dryer costs about $12/year to operate (according to the gummit -- I suspect it costs us LESS as we're a small household and not "clothes hogs"). Assuming euros == dollars (not!), that would be 25 years to break even at a $300 premium. You'd think european manufacturers would have sorted out how to make a dryer for less of a premium!
 Don Yobbo wrote:
===============
> > > Maybe in the US you should start doing that too! > > My "inexpensive" dryer costs about $12/year to operate (according > to the gummit -- I suspect it costs us LESS as we're a small > household and not "clothes hogs").
** So you use a fan ? Cos any electric real drier would cost 20 times that to run over a year. ..... Phil