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Why would anyone buy an e-reader?

Started by Fred Bloggs September 18, 2021
Like Amazon Kindle reader? Unless you have really sensitive eyes, read all the time and need that anti-glare feature. They seem to lack internet connectivity, such as allowing a google search of something in the text as you're reading, which I take to be a real limitation. Battery longevity feature is nice but who really needs it.
On 9/18/2021 5:34 AM, Fred Bloggs wrote:
> Like Amazon Kindle reader? Unless you have really sensitive eyes, read all > the time and need that anti-glare feature. They seem to lack internet > connectivity, such as allowing a google search of something in the text as > you're reading, which I take to be a real limitation. Battery longevity > feature is nice but who really needs it.
I'd not *buy* one buy have rescued several. I actually find them preferable to paperbacks (as in sci-fi, fiction, etc. -- stuff without illustrations). It's nice to be able to hold a library in your hand -- instead of boxes full of paperbacks. Put a 32G microSD card in the thing and you'll quickly discover how *small* most books really are! It's got a nice "heft" to it. It's nice to be able to read in a darkened room. It's nice to just turn it off and know your place is marked for the next time you turn it on. No dog-eared pages! It's nice to be able to adjust the size of the text and having it reflow to fit the physical display. (The built-in dictionary is sort of a waste -- esp for fiction, etc.) The "file system" (if you want to call it that) is the biggest problem. It wants to display covers of books as if in a bookstore. This limits how many titles can be displayed on the screen, at a time. I want to be able to just browse for (book,author) and could give a rats ass about what the cover looks like! The built-in Sudoku and crossword puzzle are nice diversions -- though once you've done all of the stored crosswords, it's sort of a wasted feature! I've never used the media player feature. Nor the built-in apps like Pandora. But, they're hard-wired into the device. There are some bugs (particularly in the "games") but they are tolerable. Battery life is helpful as it's a PITA to recharge most electronic devices (finding the right cord, finding a place to park the device while it is being charged, etc.). SWMBO uses a larger version of these things as its easier on her eyes (one drawback of changing typeface size is it reduces the amount of text on a page). I'd not buy one of the "epaper" devices. The displays "feel" funny (esp during refresh). One could buy a real tablet and install software to provide these functionalities -- as well as having avenues to expand (e.g., your on-line issue). But, then you have to manage software in addition to "content".
On 9/18/2021 6:03 AM, Don Y wrote:
> On 9/18/2021 5:34 AM, Fred Bloggs wrote: >> Like Amazon Kindle reader? Unless you have really sensitive eyes, read all >> the time and need that anti-glare feature. They seem to lack internet >> connectivity, such as allowing a google search of something in the text as >> you're reading, which I take to be a real limitation. Battery longevity >> feature is nice but who really needs it. > > I'd not *buy* one buy have rescued several. I actually find them preferable > to paperbacks (as in sci-fi, fiction, etc. -- stuff without illustrations).
For the record, I have Nooks, not the Amazon (or Sony, etc.) products.
Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote in
news:si4o35$fuq$1@dont-email.me: 

> On 9/18/2021 5:34 AM, Fred Bloggs wrote: >> Like Amazon Kindle reader? Unless you have really sensitive eyes, >> read all the time and need that anti-glare feature. They seem to >> lack internet connectivity, such as allowing a google search of >> something in the text as you're reading, which I take to be a >> real limitation. Battery longevity feature is nice but who really >> needs it. > > I'd not *buy* one buy have rescued several. I actually find them > preferable to paperbacks (as in sci-fi, fiction, etc. -- stuff > without illustrations). > > It's nice to be able to hold a library in your hand -- instead of > boxes full of paperbacks. Put a 32G microSD card in the thing and > you'll quickly discover how *small* most books really are! > > It's got a nice "heft" to it. > > It's nice to be able to read in a darkened room. > > It's nice to just turn it off and know your place is marked for > the next time you turn it on. No dog-eared pages! > > It's nice to be able to adjust the size of the text and having it > reflow to fit the physical display. > > (The built-in dictionary is sort of a waste -- esp for fiction, > etc.) > > The "file system" (if you want to call it that) is the biggest > problem. It wants to display covers of books as if in a bookstore. > This limits how many titles can be displayed on the screen, at a > time. I want to be able to just browse for (book,author) and > could give a rats ass about what the cover looks like! > > The built-in Sudoku and crossword puzzle are nice diversions -- > though once you've done all of the stored crosswords, it's sort of > a wasted feature! > > I've never used the media player feature. Nor the built-in apps > like Pandora. But, they're hard-wired into the device. > > There are some bugs (particularly in the "games") but they are > tolerable. > > Battery life is helpful as it's a PITA to recharge most electronic > devices (finding the right cord, finding a place to park the > device while it is being charged, etc.). > > SWMBO uses a larger version of these things as its easier on her > eyes (one drawback of changing typeface size is it reduces the > amount of text on a page). > > I'd not buy one of the "epaper" devices. The displays "feel" > funny (esp during refresh). > > One could buy a real tablet and install software to provide these > functionalities -- as well as having avenues to expand (e.g., your > on-line issue). But, then you have to manage software in addition > to "content". >
iPad Pro 12" Is the perfect carry along device. Especially if one gets the keyboard and pencil (that is the most expensive pencil ever). But the kindle is also daylight readable, so the lady on the beach can still read it.
On Saturday, September 18, 2021 at 10:34:27 PM UTC+10, Fred Bloggs wrote:
> Like Amazon Kindle reader? Unless you have really sensitive eyes, read all the time and need that anti-glare feature. They seem to lack internet connectivity, such as allowing a google search of something in the text as you're reading, which I take to be a real limitation. Battery longevity feature is nice but who really needs it.
I've had one for years. It takes me about four books to survive an international flight, and my Kindle takes up less space than just one paper-back. It's now got about fifty books in memory. You can buy e-books from Amazon over Wi-Fi links, which is handy. The screen is a bit limited for Google searches - I travel with a lap-top, which I prefer for that kind of work. -- Bill Sloman, Sydney
On 9/18/2021 9:03 AM, Don Y wrote:
> On 9/18/2021 5:34 AM, Fred Bloggs wrote: >> Like Amazon Kindle reader? Unless you have really sensitive eyes, read >> all >> the time and need that anti-glare feature. They seem to lack internet >> connectivity, such as allowing a google search of something in the >> text as >> you're reading, which I take to be a real limitation. Battery longevity >> feature is nice but who really needs it. > > I'd not *buy* one buy have rescued several.&nbsp; I actually find them > preferable > to paperbacks (as in sci-fi, fiction, etc. -- stuff without illustrations). > > It's nice to be able to hold a library in your hand -- instead of boxes > full of paperbacks.&nbsp; Put a 32G microSD card in the thing and you'll quickly > discover how *small* most books really are! > > It's got a nice "heft" to it. > > It's nice to be able to read in a darkened room. > > It's nice to just turn it off and know your place is marked for the next > time you turn it on.&nbsp; No dog-eared pages! > > It's nice to be able to adjust the size of the text and having it reflow > to fit the physical display. > > (The built-in dictionary is sort of a waste -- esp for fiction, etc.) > > The "file system" (if you want to call it that) is the biggest problem. > It wants to display covers of books as if in a bookstore.&nbsp; This limits > how many titles can be displayed on the screen, at a time.&nbsp; I want to be > able to just browse for (book,author) and could give a rats ass about what > the cover looks like! > > The built-in Sudoku and crossword puzzle are nice diversions -- though > once you've done all of the stored crosswords, it's sort of a wasted > feature! > > I've never used the media player feature.&nbsp; Nor the built-in apps like > Pandora.&nbsp; But, they're hard-wired into the device. > > There are some bugs (particularly in the "games") but they are tolerable. > > Battery life is helpful as it's a PITA to recharge most electronic devices > (finding the right cord, finding a place to park the device while it is > being charged, etc.). > > SWMBO uses a larger version of these things as its easier on her eyes > (one drawback of changing typeface size is it reduces the amount of text > on a page). > > I'd not buy one of the "epaper" devices.&nbsp; The displays "feel" funny > (esp during refresh). > > One could buy a real tablet and install software to provide these > functionalities -- as well as having avenues to expand (e.g., your > on-line issue).&nbsp; But, then you have to manage software in addition > to "content".
I use the Sony Clie PalmOS PDA as an "e-reader" back around 2005, it was monochrome with an EL backlit display I believe, even in a dark room it didn't seem to cause much eyestrain. Supported up to 256MB Sony MemorySticks and could store a lot of books on that. Got the better part of 12 hours of battery life IIRC even with the backlight running, off two AAA batteries: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sony_CLI%C3%89_PEG-SL10>
On 9/18/2021 8:34 AM, Fred Bloggs wrote:
> Like Amazon Kindle reader? Unless you have really sensitive eyes, read all the time and need that anti-glare feature. They seem to lack internet connectivity, such as allowing a google search of something in the text as you're reading, which I take to be a real limitation. Battery longevity feature is nice but who really needs it. >
Remember the Barns & Noble Nook? <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nook_Color> I had one around 2010, basically a customized Android tablet, I remember the 800 MHz Cortex A8 was some slow-ass garbage in that application.
Fred Bloggs <bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com> wrote:

 >Like Amazon Kindle reader? 

I can recommend you an Boox Note Air.

I bought mine especially with electronik-engineer-use in mind.

It is an ereader that is good for any kind of PDFs/Datasheet/schematic.
You can write in the books in the same speed than writing with a pencil on paper.
You can export anything as new pdf. It easy to use your private NAS for
data exchange. No server somewhere in the world!

It has a very fast android system with a VERY long battery lifetime because of eink.

The new eink is fast enought that you even can view grayscaled Youtube video
with some minor cutbacks in quality.

The software feels good! In these day a seldom point!

Very good for left-handed geniuses because you can turn it around
completly. :)


There is only one draw back. I NEED lt-spice for android. SIGH!

Olaf


On Saturday, September 18, 2021 at 11:30:07 AM UTC-4, olaf wrote:
> Fred Bloggs <bloggs.fred...@gmail.com> wrote: > > >Like Amazon Kindle reader? > I can recommend you an Boox Note Air. > > I bought mine especially with electronik-engineer-use in mind. > > It is an ereader that is good for any kind of PDFs/Datasheet/schematic. > You can write in the books in the same speed than writing with a pencil on paper. > You can export anything as new pdf. It easy to use your private NAS for > data exchange. No server somewhere in the world! > > It has a very fast android system with a VERY long battery lifetime because of eink. > > The new eink is fast enought that you even can view grayscaled Youtube video > with some minor cutbacks in quality. > > The software feels good! In these day a seldom point! > > Very good for left-handed geniuses because you can turn it around > completly. :) > > > There is only one draw back. I NEED lt-spice for android. SIGH!
That looks very top of the line.
> > Olaf
On Saturday, September 18, 2021 at 9:03:40 AM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:
> On 9/18/2021 5:34 AM, Fred Bloggs wrote: > > Like Amazon Kindle reader? Unless you have really sensitive eyes, read all > > the time and need that anti-glare feature. They seem to lack internet > > connectivity, such as allowing a google search of something in the text as > > you're reading, which I take to be a real limitation. Battery longevity > > feature is nice but who really needs it. > I'd not *buy* one buy have rescued several. I actually find them preferable > to paperbacks (as in sci-fi, fiction, etc. -- stuff without illustrations). > > It's nice to be able to hold a library in your hand -- instead of boxes > full of paperbacks. Put a 32G microSD card in the thing and you'll quickly > discover how *small* most books really are! > > It's got a nice "heft" to it. > > It's nice to be able to read in a darkened room. > > It's nice to just turn it off and know your place is marked for the next > time you turn it on. No dog-eared pages! > > It's nice to be able to adjust the size of the text and having it reflow > to fit the physical display. > > (The built-in dictionary is sort of a waste -- esp for fiction, etc.) > > The "file system" (if you want to call it that) is the biggest problem. > It wants to display covers of books as if in a bookstore. This limits > how many titles can be displayed on the screen, at a time. I want to be > able to just browse for (book,author) and could give a rats ass about what > the cover looks like! > > The built-in Sudoku and crossword puzzle are nice diversions -- though > once you've done all of the stored crosswords, it's sort of a wasted feature! > > I've never used the media player feature. Nor the built-in apps like > Pandora. But, they're hard-wired into the device. > > There are some bugs (particularly in the "games") but they are tolerable. > > Battery life is helpful as it's a PITA to recharge most electronic devices > (finding the right cord, finding a place to park the device while it is > being charged, etc.). > > SWMBO uses a larger version of these things as its easier on her eyes > (one drawback of changing typeface size is it reduces the amount of text > on a page). > > I'd not buy one of the "epaper" devices. The displays "feel" funny > (esp during refresh). > > One could buy a real tablet and install software to provide these > functionalities -- as well as having avenues to expand (e.g., your > on-line issue). But, then you have to manage software in addition > to "content".
Thanks for the lowdown. Sounds perfect for an ebook addict.