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markings on XTALs what do they mean?

Started by Johann Klammer August 27, 2021
I have a defective LCD monitor here.
It has two xtals inside. HC49 thru hole.
they have something printed on the can.

Number one:
TXC G 
14.3EF19

Number two:
TXC G 
20ARG95

It does not match any part numbers 
on the TXC website.

I would like to know f, tolerance and load cap.
Thank you.

On a sunny day (Fri, 27 Aug 2021 18:46:27 +0200) it happened Johann Klammer
<klammerj@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote in <sgb4tg$1mk6$1@gioia.aioe.org>:

>I have a defective LCD monitor here. >It has two xtals inside. HC49 thru hole. >they have something printed on the can. > >Number one: >TXC G >14.3EF19
Could be 14.3 MHz do you have a shortwave radio? listen for carrier there? A frequency counter helps too!
>Number two: >TXC G >20ARG95
20 MHz?
>I would like to know f,
http://panteltje.com/panteltje/pic/freq_pic/
>It does not match any part on the TXC website.
>tolerance and load cap.
Yea, that is more difficult,
Johann Klammer wrote:
====================
> I have a defective LCD monitor here. > It has two xtals inside. HC49 thru hole. > they have something printed on the can. > > Number one: > TXC G > 14.3EF19 > > Number two: > TXC G > 20ARG95 > > It does not match any part numbers > on the TXC website. > > I would like to know f, tolerance and load cap.
** Why ????? Likely they are nothing special at all. Just regular clock frequency X-tals, ..... Phil
On 27/08/2021 17:59, Jan Panteltje wrote:

<snipped>

> On a sunny day (Fri, 27 Aug 2021 18:46:27 +0200) it happened Johann Klammer > <klammerj@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote in <sgb4tg$1mk6$1@gioia.aioe.org>: > >> I have a defective LCD monitor here. >> It has two xtals inside. HC49 thru hole. >> they have something printed on the can. >> >> Number one: >> TXC G >> 14.3EF19 > > Could be 14.3 MHz
Yes, 14.3 MHz is something to do with NTSC, it is (or was) a very common crystal. -- Cheers Clive
 Clive Arthur wrote:
=================
> Yes, 14.3 MHz is something to do with NTSC, it is (or was) a very common > crystal. >
** Very close to 4 times the color burst frequency. 3.579545 MHz For a long time the *cheapest* crystal you could buy in stores. Got one in my home brew frequency counter. ..... Phil
On 08/28/2021 11:09 AM, Clive Arthur wrote:
> On 27/08/2021 17:59, Jan Panteltje wrote: > > <snipped> > >> On a sunny day (Fri, 27 Aug 2021 18:46:27 +0200) it happened Johann Klammer >> <klammerj@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote in <sgb4tg$1mk6$1@gioia.aioe.org>: >> >>> I have a defective LCD monitor here. >>> It has two xtals inside. HC49 thru hole. >>> they have something printed on the can. >>> >>> Number one: >>> TXC G >>> 14.3EF19 >> >> Could be 14.3 MHz > > Yes, 14.3 MHz is something to do with NTSC, it is (or was) a very common crystal. >
Does that have more digits after the three, coz I can not seem to find exactly 14.3M at any distributor.
l&oslash;rdag den 28. august 2021 kl. 16.15.52 UTC+2 skrev Johann Klammer:
> On 08/28/2021 11:09 AM, Clive Arthur wrote: > > On 27/08/2021 17:59, Jan Panteltje wrote: > > > > <snipped> > > > >> On a sunny day (Fri, 27 Aug 2021 18:46:27 +0200) it happened Johann Klammer > >> <klam...@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote in <sgb4tg$1mk6$1...@gioia.aioe.org>: > >> > >>> I have a defective LCD monitor here. > >>> It has two xtals inside. HC49 thru hole. > >>> they have something printed on the can. > >>> > >>> Number one: > >>> TXC G > >>> 14.3EF19 > >> > >> Could be 14.3 MHz > > > > Yes, 14.3 MHz is something to do with NTSC, it is (or was) a very common crystal. > > > Does that have more digits after the three, coz I can not seem > to find exactly 14.3M at any distributor.
14.31818 (4*3.579545 )
On Fri, 27 Aug 2021 18:46:27 +0200, Johann Klammer
<klammerj@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote:

>I have a defective LCD monitor here. >It has two xtals inside. HC49 thru hole. >they have something printed on the can. > >Number one: >TXC G >14.3EF19 > >Number two: >TXC G >20ARG95 > >It does not match any part numbers >on the TXC website. > >I would like to know f, tolerance and load cap. >Thank you.
You should associate the parts with their application. These days, that generally means the ASIC they're tied to. Look up the chip numbers and typical app notes. RL
On a sunny day (Sat, 28 Aug 2021 16:15:34 +0200) it happened Johann Klammer
<klammerj@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote in <sgdgeh$3ik$1@gioia.aioe.org>:

>On 08/28/2021 11:09 AM, Clive Arthur wrote: >> On 27/08/2021 17:59, Jan Panteltje wrote: >> >> <snipped> >> >>> On a sunny day (Fri, 27 Aug 2021 18:46:27 +0200) it happened Johann Klammer >>> <klammerj@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote in <sgb4tg$1mk6$1@gioia.aioe.org>: >>> >>>> I have a defective LCD monitor here. >>>> It has two xtals inside. HC49 thru hole. >>>> they have something printed on the can. >>>> >>>> Number one: >>>> TXC G >>>> 14.3EF19 >>> >>> Could be 14.3 MHz >> >> Yes, 14.3 MHz is something to do with NTSC, it is (or was) a very common crystal. >> >Does that have more digits after the three, coz I can not seem >to find exactly 14.3M at any distributor.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/152877695069 10 for 4$30 many sellers have these
On a sunny day (Sat, 28 Aug 2021 16:15:34 +0200) it happened Johann Klammer
<klammerj@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote in <sgdgeh$3ik$1@gioia.aioe.org>:

>Does that have more digits after the three, coz I can not seem >to find exactly 14.3M at any distributor.
PS I have no idea what you are trying to do, but the probability of such crystals being defective in that application is close to zero. Better tell us what you are doing, and what test equipment and experience you have, multimeter, scope, etc.