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Can you run LTspice on a cellphone?

Started by Steve Wilson June 11, 2021
tirsdag den 15. juni 2021 kl. 00.57.30 UTC+2 skrev Steve Wilson:
> Johann Klammer <klam...@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote: > > > On 06/12/2021 03:46 AM, Steve Wilson wrote: > >> A google search shows a number of ways of running MS programs on > >> android cellphones. One method suggests running Wine, then you can load > >> whatever EXE desired. > >> > >> Has anyone been able to run LTspice on android? How did you do it, and > >> how well does it work? > >> > >> Thanks, > >> > >> > >> > > Wine runs natively, so it'll need some x86 underneath. > > It's also the reason you can't use the newer windows > > stuff on 32 bit systems. > Android runs ARM. It emulates X86 to run Wine: > > https://www.google.ca/search?q=run+wine+on+android
and if you read them you'd know you need an x86 device to run anything but WinRT apps
On 6/14/2021 3:57 PM, Steve Wilson wrote:
> Johann Klammer <klammerj@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote: > >> On 06/12/2021 03:46 AM, Steve Wilson wrote: >>> A google search shows a number of ways of running MS programs on >>> android cellphones. One method suggests running Wine, then you can load >>> whatever EXE desired. >>> >>> Has anyone been able to run LTspice on android? How did you do it, and >>> how well does it work? >>> >>> Thanks, >>> >>> >>> >> Wine runs natively, so it'll need some x86 underneath. >> It's also the reason you can't use the newer windows >> stuff on 32 bit systems. > > Android runs ARM. It emulates X86 to run Wine: > > https://www.google.ca/search?q=run+wine+on+android
Let's get some nomenclature right: ARM is a hardware *platform* (CPU technology). Android is a software platform (OS). Android runs *on* ARM (as well as x86). Software runs ON hardware. Applications run on OSs (or OS emulators) Wine on Android on ARM supports only applications that were designed to run on Windows RT, 32b. (can you say that for LTspice?) From <https://updato.com/how-to/windows-on-android-wine-3-0-use-windows-emulator-for-android/>: "Despite the fact that Wine 3.0 can run Windows on Android, (Note "Android", not EVERY Android port!) in theory, the developers are keen to state that it isn&rsquo;t really a Windows emulator for Android. More so due to the fact that the software is barely stable enough to run, (this has been the issue with Wine since forever!) and its compatibility is hardware-dependent. Wine 3.0 is best compatible with an Android device packed with a processor that runs on x86 architecture. (this ^^!) Since the majority of our mobile and tablet devices run on ARM-powered SoC, this means that the support is limited. However, CodeWeavers have released a version of Wine 3.0 for ARM-based devices as well, but with limited compatibility for apps. (and this ^^) Support to run programs for Windows on Android is limited to applications ported to the Windows RT operating system. (and this ^^) Since there aren&rsquo;t many applications available for Microsoft&rsquo;s 32-bit Windows RT operating system, you&rsquo;ll need an x86 chipset Android phone or tablet, or a Chromebook to make the best out of it." Then: "We tested out the Wine 3.0 app on a couple of ARM-based Android devices, and could only get it to work on the Samsung Galaxy Tab A. The app launched perfectly every time (note the "app" is Wine, not LTspice!) and the interface with workable, but most Windows RT apps that we tried out either failed to launch or gave back and error. (ooops!) CodeWeavers recommend that you use Wine 3.0 on an Android device running an x86 SoC chipset for stable performance. (Android on x86) Seems to me that the LTspice people would be the best place to start as they, undoubtedly, would like their app to be as universally accessible as possible! Even if that means adding some effort to their task. OTOH, they may feel there is no need to expend effort to port their app to a phone -- and have to deal with the issues that it presents (UI/UX), there.
On 6/14/2021 8:20 PM, Don Y wrote:
> On 6/14/2021 3:57 PM, Steve Wilson wrote: >> Johann Klammer <klammerj@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote: >> >>> On 06/12/2021 03:46 AM, Steve Wilson wrote: >>>> A google search shows a number of ways of running MS programs on >>>> android cellphones. One method suggests running Wine, then you can load >>>> whatever EXE desired. >>>> >>>> Has anyone been able to run LTspice on android? How did you do it, and >>>> how well does it work? >>>> >>>> Thanks, >>>> >>>> >>>> >>> Wine runs natively, so it'll need some x86 underneath. >>> It's also the reason you can't use the newer windows >>> stuff on 32 bit systems. >> >> Android runs ARM. It emulates X86 to run Wine: >> >> https://www.google.ca/search?q=run+wine+on+android > > Let's get some nomenclature right: > > ARM is a hardware *platform* (CPU technology). > Android is a software platform (OS). > > Android runs *on* ARM (as well as x86). > Software runs ON hardware. > Applications run on OSs (or OS emulators) > > Wine on Android on ARM supports only applications > that were designed to run on Windows RT, 32b. > (can you say that for LTspice?) > > From > <https://updato.com/how-to/windows-on-android-wine-3-0-use-windows-emulator-for-android/>: > > > &nbsp;&nbsp; "Despite the fact that Wine 3.0 can run Windows on Android, > > &nbsp;&nbsp; (Note "Android", not EVERY Android port!) > > &nbsp;&nbsp; in theory, the developers are keen to state that it isn&rsquo;t really > &nbsp;&nbsp; a Windows emulator for Android. More so due to the fact that the > &nbsp;&nbsp; software is barely stable enough to run, > > &nbsp;&nbsp; (this has been the issue with Wine since forever!) > > &nbsp;&nbsp; and its compatibility is hardware-dependent. Wine 3.0 is best > &nbsp;&nbsp; compatible with an Android device packed with a processor that > &nbsp;&nbsp; runs on x86 architecture. > > &nbsp;&nbsp; (this ^^!) > > &nbsp;&nbsp; Since the majority of our mobile and tablet devices run on > &nbsp;&nbsp; ARM-powered SoC, this means that the support is limited. > &nbsp;&nbsp; However, CodeWeavers have released a version of Wine 3.0 > &nbsp;&nbsp; for ARM-based devices as well, but with limited compatibility > &nbsp;&nbsp; for apps. > > &nbsp;&nbsp; (and this ^^) > > &nbsp;&nbsp; Support to run programs for Windows on Android is limited to > &nbsp;&nbsp; applications ported to the Windows RT operating system. > > &nbsp;&nbsp; (and this ^^) > > &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Since there aren&rsquo;t many applications available for Microsoft&rsquo;s > &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 32-bit Windows RT operating system, you&rsquo;ll need an x86 chipset > &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Android phone or tablet, or a Chromebook to make the best out > &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; of it." > > Then: > > &nbsp;&nbsp; "We tested out the Wine 3.0 app on a couple of ARM-based > &nbsp;&nbsp; Android devices, and could only get it to work on the > &nbsp;&nbsp; Samsung Galaxy Tab A.&nbsp; The app launched perfectly every time > > &nbsp;&nbsp; (note the "app" is Wine, not LTspice!) > > &nbsp;&nbsp; and the interface with workable, but most Windows RT > &nbsp;&nbsp; apps that we tried out either failed to launch or gave > &nbsp;&nbsp; back and error. > > &nbsp;&nbsp; (ooops!) > > &nbsp;&nbsp; CodeWeavers recommend that you use Wine 3.0 on an Android > &nbsp;&nbsp; device running an x86 SoC chipset for stable performance. > > &nbsp;&nbsp; (Android on x86) > > Seems to me that the LTspice people would be the best > place to start as they, undoubtedly, would like their > app to be as universally accessible as possible!&nbsp; Even > if that means adding some effort to their task. > > OTOH, they may feel there is no need to expend effort > to port their app to a phone -- and have to deal with > the issues that it presents (UI/UX), there.
Analog Devices owns LTSpice now, Mike Engelhardt is gone and I expect there is no interest in the current management's plan for that software other than what can be confirmed to directly leads to more sales of AD chips and making it buggy junk as a side-hobby.
On Mon, 14 Jun 2021 21:07:36 -0400, bitrex <user@example.net> wrote:

>Analog Devices owns LTSpice now, Mike Engelhardt is gone and I expect >there is no interest in the current management's plan for that software >other than what can be confirmed to directly leads to more sales of AD >chips and making it buggy junk as a side-hobby.
<https://www.linkedin.com/in/mike-engelhardt-a788a822/> Under the "About" section: Best known as the author of LTspice, but have since written an all new and better simulator! Currently working on an appropriate business model for it. Message me if interested. -- Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com PO Box 272 http://www.LearnByDestroying.com Ben Lomond CA 95005-0272 Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
On Mon, 14 Jun 2021 20:05:39 -0700, Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@cruzio.com>
wrote:

>On Mon, 14 Jun 2021 21:07:36 -0400, bitrex <user@example.net> wrote: > >>Analog Devices owns LTSpice now, Mike Engelhardt is gone and I expect >>there is no interest in the current management's plan for that software >>other than what can be confirmed to directly leads to more sales of AD >>chips and making it buggy junk as a side-hobby. > ><https://www.linkedin.com/in/mike-engelhardt-a788a822/> >Under the "About" section: > Best known as the author of LTspice, but have since written > an all new and better simulator! Currently working on an > appropriate business model for it. Message me if interested.
His simulator should be not too far away now. -- Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

> tirsdag den 15. juni 2021 kl. 00.57.30 UTC+2 skrev Steve Wilson: >> Johann Klammer <klam...@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote: >> >> > On 06/12/2021 03:46 AM, Steve Wilson wrote: >> >> A google search shows a number of ways of running MS programs on >> >> android cellphones. One method suggests running Wine, then you can >> >> load whatever EXE desired. >> >> >> >> Has anyone been able to run LTspice on android? How did you do it, >> >> and how well does it work? >> >> >> >> Thanks, >> >> >> >> >> >> >> > Wine runs natively, so it'll need some x86 underneath. >> > It's also the reason you can't use the newer windows stuff on 32 bit >> > systems. >> Android runs ARM. It emulates X86 to run Wine: >> >> https://www.google.ca/search?q=run+wine+on+android > > and if you read them you'd know you need an x86 device to run anything > but WinRT apps
LTspice IV and XVII run fine under Wine. -- The best designs occur in the theta state. - sw
tirsdag den 15. juni 2021 kl. 06.07.21 UTC+2 skrev Steve Wilson:
> Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote: > > tirsdag den 15. juni 2021 kl. 00.57.30 UTC+2 skrev Steve Wilson: > >> Johann Klammer <klam...@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote: > >> > >> > On 06/12/2021 03:46 AM, Steve Wilson wrote: > >> >> A google search shows a number of ways of running MS programs on > >> >> android cellphones. One method suggests running Wine, then you can > >> >> load whatever EXE desired. > >> >> > >> >> Has anyone been able to run LTspice on android? How did you do it, > >> >> and how well does it work? > >> >> > >> >> Thanks, > >> >> > >> >> > >> >> > >> > Wine runs natively, so it'll need some x86 underneath. > >> > It's also the reason you can't use the newer windows stuff on 32 bit > >> > systems. > >> Android runs ARM. It emulates X86 to run Wine: > >> > >> https://www.google.ca/search?q=run+wine+on+android > > > > and if you read them you'd know you need an x86 device to run anything > > but WinRT apps > LTspice IV and XVII run fine under Wine.
sure, as long as you have got an x86 cpu
Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

> tirsdag den 15. juni 2021 kl. 06.07.21 UTC+2 skrev Steve Wilson: >> Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote: >> > tirsdag den 15. juni 2021 kl. 00.57.30 UTC+2 skrev Steve Wilson: >> >> Johann Klammer <klam...@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote: >> >> >> >> > On 06/12/2021 03:46 AM, Steve Wilson wrote: >> >> >> A google search shows a number of ways of running MS programs on >> >> >> android cellphones. One method suggests running Wine, then you >> >> >> can load whatever EXE desired. >> >> >> >> >> >> Has anyone been able to run LTspice on android? How did you do >> >> >> it, and how well does it work? >> >> >> >> >> >> Thanks, >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> > Wine runs natively, so it'll need some x86 underneath. >> >> > It's also the reason you can't use the newer windows stuff on 32 >> >> > bit systems. >> >> Android runs ARM. It emulates X86 to run Wine: >> >> >> >> https://www.google.ca/search?q=run+wine+on+android >> > >> > and if you read them you'd know you need an x86 device to run >> > anything but WinRT apps >> LTspice IV and XVII run fine under Wine. > > sure, as long as you have got an x86 cpu
Nope. As above: "Android runs ARM. It emulates X86 to run Wine" Here is a 2019 article. There are some compatibility problems, but these are expected to be ironed out. ------------------------------------------------------------------- How to Run Windows Apps on Android With Wine By Christian Cawley Published Dec 12, 2019 If you want to run Windows apps on Android, this is how you do it. Ever wanted to run Windows software on your Android device? Probably not... but what if you could? What if your Android device could finally act as a Windows desktop replacement, simply by running Windows software? Recently, the Wine project has released an Android-compatible version. Long embraced by Linux users (mostly gamers) requiring a fix of their favorite Windows-only software, this option is now available on Android. But does it work as well as expected? And why would you bother anyway, given the wealth of software available on Android? Let's find out. What Is Wine? Often mistakenly described as an "emulator", Wine (a recursive acronym that stands for Wine Is Not an Emulator) is in fact a compatibility layer. This is a software library that makes Linux, macOS and BSD capable of running Windows application. Although some emulation is involved (specifically, the Windows runtime environment), Wine does not emulate an operating system. Over the years, Wine has become increasingly popular as a way to run Windows software on other platforms. While installing a virtual machine is one option (perhaps, say, to run Microsoft Office on Linux), Wine is arguably simpler to set up. Wine has been available for ARM devices (such as the Raspberry Pi) for some time. Now Wine has been released for Android. How to Install Wine on Android Before installing Wine on your Android device, you'll need to ensure you can install APKs. Typically, the ability to install software on your phone or tablet is restricted to any source beyond the Google Play Store by default. Enable this by opening Settings > Security and tapping the switch for Unknown sources. Click OK to confirm the action. Wine is available as an APK file for Android from the Wine download site. Download: Wine for Android (Free) Several versions are available for ARM processors (most Android devices) and x86 processors (mostly tablets, but only a small number). Identify which architecture your device has before downloading (you can check this by finding the device on Wikipedia). After downloading to your device (or to your PC, before syncing to your favorite cloud drive), it's time to install. Tap the APK file, and agree to installation. Wait as it unpacks, then approve the installation; you'll be notified that Wine needs access to record audio, and modify, delete, and read the contents of your device's SD card. Audio recording is required by some apps you might wish to use in Wine. Once installation is complete, hit open, and wait while the Windows environment is created. Which Windows Apps Can You Run? While Wine will run some software on ARM devices, the best results will be found on those x86-based Android devices. Since you're probably on an ARM-based Android device, you'll be limited to apps that have been adapted for use on Windows RT. XDA-developers has produced a list of apps that run on ARM-based Windows devices, so this is a good place to start. Among these apps are useful tools such as Audacity, Notepad++, FileZilla, Paint.NET. You'll also find some retro games that have been open sourced. These include Doom and Quake 2, as well as open source clone OpenTTD, a version of Transport Tycoon. As Wine's popularity on Android and ARM devices increases, however, this list is bound to grow. We understand the Wine project is developing a method of using QEMU to emulate x86 instructions on ARM hardware, so this bodes well for the future. Some Features Are Missing... For Now Certain libraries and APIs are required for games to run. Some common APIs are currently missing from Wine on Android. Missing, but likely to appear at some stage, are Direct3D 12, Vulkan, and full OpenGL ES support (to enable Direct3D; this is currently limited). Introducing these in Wine for Android will expand the selection of applications that can be used. However, Wine is under constant development. As such, these features can be expected in a future release. Happily, Wine supports Direct3D 10 and 11, Direct3D command stream, and the Android graphics driver. Meanwhile, we can also enjoy improved DirectWrite and Direct2D support. Exploring Wine on Android When the software environment launches, you'll find a standard Windows 7-style Start menu (with Wine logo), and a command line box. To interact with Wine, you'll need a keyboard (and maybe a mouse) attached to your Android device. At this stage, shortly after Wine 3.0 for Android has been released, there is no support for software keyboards, although tapping is okay. The size of the desktop might be a problem, however; on the device I tested this on, a Samsung Galaxy S2 tablet, the Start button was tiny. To fix this, I switched the orientation to portrait mode and then back to landscape. This is why a mouse, or perhaps a stylus, is a good idea. The command line interface works much as the standard Windows command prompt did (prior to PowerShell's arrival). Meanwhile, you can tap the Start button to find two menus. First is Control Panel, with sub-menus Add/Remove Programs, Game Controllers, and internet Settings. Second is Run... Using Run... you can open a dialogue box to issue commands. For instance, launching internet Explorer is possible by entering iexplore. All four options open a typical Windows-style screen to alter the settings. Installing Software in Wine To get something running in Wine, you'll first need to download the application (or sync via the cloud) to your Android device. Save it in a memorable location, then navigate to it in the Wine Command Prompt window. For instance, if I downloaded a Windows executable file (EXE) to my Android tablet, I'd save it to the Download folder. This can be reached in the command line with: cd sdcard/Download/[filename.exe] To run the file in Wine for Android, simply input the name of the EXE file. (Some versions of Wine require you to prefix this with the wine command, but this isn't necessary.) If the ARM-ready file is compatible, it should run. Otherwise, you'll see a bunch of error messages. At this stage, installing Windows software on Android in Wine isn't an exact science. Help, My Android Won't Run Wine! Having problems? Not all Android devices can run Wine. While it runs on my Galaxy Tab S2, it apparently doesn't work on the Tab S. Similarly, the OnePlus 5T will run Wine, whereas the 2016 Google Pixel will not. Others with issues include the Xiaomi Mi5 and Huawei Mate 10. Eventually compatibility will increase, and a list of supported devices will no doubt be created. Until then, it's really a case of trial and error. Meanwhile, if you own a Chromebook with Developer Mode enabled, you'll be able to install Wine on a more suitable machine. Note that there is also a version of Crossover for Chrome OS, although this requires an x86 CPU. Wine on Android: It's Happening In a development that seemed unlikely just five years ago, it is now possible to run Windows software on Android. While you might prefer to remote connect to a Windows PC via Android, or even stream games from your PC, this nevertheless offers a rare opportunity to take Windows with you. The possibilities Wine on Android offers are considerable. While currently limited, it's likely that what's possible with Wine on your smartphone or tablet will increase over time, as bugs are ironed out and compatibility improved. https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/run-windows-apps-android/ ------------------------------------------------------------------- Additional Info: ------------------------------------------------------------------- So, Wine on Android is a bit limited at the moment, but it&#2013266066;s early days. As the name is keen to remind you, Wine is not an emulator, just a compatibility layer, so for the best results you&#2013266066;ll want to use an Android device with an x86 Intel processor (such as a tablet or Chromebook). If your Android device uses an ARM processor (pretty much all smartphones do), then Wine uses the open source emulator QEMU. This adds a layer of complexity, but for now it&#2013266066;s an impressive feat to get Windows programs running on Android devices, and users can look forward to future versions that add new features and iron out the kinks. https://www.techradar.com/news/wine-30-lets-you-run-windows-programs-on- android ------------------------------------------------------------------- -- The best designs occur in the theta state. - sw
Steve Wilson wrote:
> A google search shows a number of ways of running MS programs on > android cellphones. One method suggests running Wine, then you can > load whatever EXE desired. > > Has anyone been able to run LTspice on android? How did you do it, > and how well does it work?
If you have a Linux phone ($800 and the most secure phone) you can run Virtual Box and load a Windows image in that. -- Defund the Thought Police
On Tuesday, June 15, 2021 at 2:34:56 AM UTC-7, Steve Wilson wrote:
> Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote: > > > tirsdag den 15. juni 2021 kl. 06.07.21 UTC+2 skrev Steve Wilson: > >> Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote: > >> > tirsdag den 15. juni 2021 kl. 00.57.30 UTC+2 skrev Steve Wilson: > >> >> Johann Klammer <klam...@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote: > >> >> > >> >> > On 06/12/2021 03:46 AM, Steve Wilson wrote: > >> >> >> A google search shows a number of ways of running MS programs on > >> >> >> android cellphones. One method suggests running Wine, then you > >> >> >> can load whatever EXE desired. > >> >> >> > >> >> >> Has anyone been able to run LTspice on android? How did you do > >> >> >> it, and how well does it work? > >> >> >> > >> >> >> Thanks, > >> >> >> > >> >> >> > >> >> >> > >> >> > Wine runs natively, so it'll need some x86 underneath. > >> >> > It's also the reason you can't use the newer windows stuff on 32 > >> >> > bit systems. > >> >> Android runs ARM. It emulates X86 to run Wine: > >> >> > >> >> https://www.google.ca/search?q=run+wine+on+android > >> > > >> > and if you read them you'd know you need an x86 device to run > >> > anything but WinRT apps > >> LTspice IV and XVII run fine under Wine.
Linux, perhaps.
> > sure, as long as you have got an x86 cpu > Nope. As above: "Android runs ARM. It emulates X86 to run Wine"
The question is why would you want to run electronics design software on a phone? With limited screen area and no keyboard or mouse, Window apps are hard to use. Even Java apps on Linux are unreliable. The STM IDE freezes and crashs often. I am currently compiling project outside the IDE, with just makefiles.