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Hide your sulphuric acid

Started by Piotr Wyderski January 17, 2021
Dear fellow terrorists,

Per the European regulation 2019/1148, available here, page 16:

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32019R1148&from=pl

"List  of  substances  which  are  not  to  be  made  available  to,  or 
  introduced,  possessed  or  used  by,  members  of  the  general 
public,  whether  on  their  own  or  in  mixtures  or  substances  that 
  include those substances, unless the concentration is equal to or 
lower than the limit values set out in column 2, and for which 
suspicious transactions and significant disappearances and thefts  are 
to  be  reported  within  24  hours"

HNO3 in concentrations above 3% (old news)
H2SO4 in concentrations above 15%.

And, further:

"List  of  substances  on  their  own  or  in  mixtures  or  in 
substances  for  which  suspicious  transactions  and  significant 
disappearances  and  thefts  are  to  be  reported  within  24  hours"

*Acetone*, Potassium Nitrate, Sodium Nitrate, Calcium Nitrate.

The regulation will have been effective by February.

	Best regards, Piotr





On 18-Jan-21 7:50 am, Piotr Wyderski wrote:
> Dear fellow terrorists, > > Per the European regulation 2019/1148, available here, page 16: > > https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32019R1148&from=pl > > > "List  of  substances  which  are  not  to  be  made  available  to,  or >  introduced,  possessed  or  used  by,  members  of  the  general > public,  whether  on  their  own  or  in  mixtures  or  substances  that >  include those substances, unless the concentration is equal to or > lower than the limit values set out in column 2, and for which > suspicious transactions and significant disappearances and thefts  are > to  be  reported  within  24  hours" > > HNO3 in concentrations above 3% (old news) > H2SO4 in concentrations above 15%. > > And, further: > > "List  of  substances  on  their  own  or  in  mixtures  or  in > substances  for  which  suspicious  transactions  and  significant > disappearances  and  thefts  are  to  be  reported  within  24  hours" > > *Acetone*, Potassium Nitrate, Sodium Nitrate, Calcium Nitrate. > > The regulation will have been effective by February. > >     Best regards, Piotr > > > > >
Stupid policy. Since there are ways to make concentrated sulphuric acid, it won't prevent terrorists from getting it. But it will encourage non-criminals who need it for other purposes to engage in dangerous processes that wouldn't otherwise be required. What next - ban Nitrogen? Let's see how well that would work out. Sylvia.
On Fri, 19 Nov 2021 11:57:38 +1100, Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid>
wrote:

>On 18-Jan-21 7:50 am, Piotr Wyderski wrote: >> Dear fellow terrorists, >> >> Per the European regulation 2019/1148, available here, page 16: >> >> https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32019R1148&from=pl >> >> >> "List&#2013266080; of&#2013266080; substances&#2013266080; which&#2013266080; are&#2013266080; not&#2013266080; to&#2013266080; be&#2013266080; made&#2013266080; available&#2013266080; to,&#2013266080; or >> &#2013266080;introduced,&#2013266080; possessed&#2013266080; or&#2013266080; used&#2013266080; by,&#2013266080; members&#2013266080; of&#2013266080; the&#2013266080; general >> public,&#2013266080; whether&#2013266080; on&#2013266080; their&#2013266080; own&#2013266080; or&#2013266080; in&#2013266080; mixtures&#2013266080; or&#2013266080; substances&#2013266080; that >> &#2013266080;include those substances, unless the concentration is equal to or >> lower than the limit values set out in column 2, and for which >> suspicious transactions and significant disappearances and thefts&#2013266080; are >> to&#2013266080; be&#2013266080; reported&#2013266080; within&#2013266080; 24&#2013266080; hours" >> >> HNO3 in concentrations above 3% (old news) >> H2SO4 in concentrations above 15%. >> >> And, further: >> >> "List&#2013266080; of&#2013266080; substances&#2013266080; on&#2013266080; their&#2013266080; own&#2013266080; or&#2013266080; in&#2013266080; mixtures&#2013266080; or&#2013266080; in >> substances&#2013266080; for&#2013266080; which&#2013266080; suspicious&#2013266080; transactions&#2013266080; and&#2013266080; significant >> disappearances&#2013266080; and&#2013266080; thefts&#2013266080; are&#2013266080; to&#2013266080; be&#2013266080; reported&#2013266080; within&#2013266080; 24&#2013266080; hours" >> >> *Acetone*, Potassium Nitrate, Sodium Nitrate, Calcium Nitrate. >> >> The regulation will have been effective by February. >> >> &#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;Best regards, Piotr >> >> >> >> >> > >Stupid policy. Since there are ways to make concentrated sulphuric acid, >it won't prevent terrorists from getting it. But it will encourage >non-criminals who need it for other purposes to engage in dangerous >processes that wouldn't otherwise be required. > >What next - ban Nitrogen? Let's see how well that would work out. > >Sylvia.
I have a can of Extra Strength Acetone. That must really be dangerous. -- Father Brown's figure remained quite dark and still; but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was always most valuable when he had lost it.
On 19/11/2021 05:03, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
> On Fri, 19 Nov 2021 11:57:38 +1100, Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid> > wrote: > >> On 18-Jan-21 7:50 am, Piotr Wyderski wrote: >>> Dear fellow terrorists, >>> >>> Per the European regulation 2019/1148, available here, page 16: >>> >>> https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32019R1148&from=pl >>> >>> >>> "List&nbsp; of&nbsp; substances&nbsp; which&nbsp; are&nbsp; not&nbsp; to&nbsp; be&nbsp; made&nbsp; available&nbsp; to,&nbsp; or >>> &nbsp;introduced,&nbsp; possessed&nbsp; or&nbsp; used&nbsp; by,&nbsp; members&nbsp; of&nbsp; the&nbsp; general >>> public,&nbsp; whether&nbsp; on&nbsp; their&nbsp; own&nbsp; or&nbsp; in&nbsp; mixtures&nbsp; or&nbsp; substances&nbsp; that >>> &nbsp;include those substances, unless the concentration is equal to or >>> lower than the limit values set out in column 2, and for which >>> suspicious transactions and significant disappearances and thefts&nbsp; are >>> to&nbsp; be&nbsp; reported&nbsp; within&nbsp; 24&nbsp; hours" >>> >>> HNO3 in concentrations above 3% (old news) >>> H2SO4 in concentrations above 15%. >>> >>> And, further: >>> >>> "List&nbsp; of&nbsp; substances&nbsp; on&nbsp; their&nbsp; own&nbsp; or&nbsp; in&nbsp; mixtures&nbsp; or&nbsp; in >>> substances&nbsp; for&nbsp; which&nbsp; suspicious&nbsp; transactions&nbsp; and&nbsp; significant >>> disappearances&nbsp; and&nbsp; thefts&nbsp; are&nbsp; to&nbsp; be&nbsp; reported&nbsp; within&nbsp; 24&nbsp; hours" >>> >>> *Acetone*, Potassium Nitrate, Sodium Nitrate, Calcium Nitrate. >>> >>> The regulation will have been effective by February. >>> >>> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Best regards, Piotr >> >> Stupid policy. Since there are ways to make concentrated sulphuric acid, >> it won't prevent terrorists from getting it. But it will encourage >> non-criminals who need it for other purposes to engage in dangerous >> processes that wouldn't otherwise be required.
I'm not sure it is all that stupid there have been a spate of acid attacks using concentrated sulphuric acid in the not too distant past. https://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/london-is-acid-attack-hotspot-of-western-world-with-victims-as-young-as-10-a4222921.html The big problem is that quite a few of the chemicals they want to ban have important and legitimate uses in gardening and agriculture. Sulphur, charcoal, potassium nitrate, ammonium nitrate for example. When I lived in Belgium I was very surprised to see conc HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4 on sale in the local supermarket and the shelf they were on corroded to hell. Caustic gels are still on sale as drain cleaner.
> I have a can of Extra Strength Acetone. That must really be dangerous.
Only if you mix it with H2O2 carefully at the right temperature and live to tell the tale. Strangely when I last bought some maximum UK permitted strength peroxide Amazon helpfully suggested that I should buy some acetone too! "Most people who bought this also bought that"...*REALLY!* -- Regards, Martin Brown
On 2021-11-19, Martin Brown <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:
> On 19/11/2021 05:03, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote: >> On Fri, 19 Nov 2021 11:57:38 +1100, Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid> >> wrote: >> >>> On 18-Jan-21 7:50 am, Piotr Wyderski wrote: >>>> Dear fellow terrorists, >>>> >>>> Per the European regulation 2019/1148, available here, page 16: >>>> >>>> https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32019R1148&from=pl >>>> >>>> >>>> "List&nbsp; of&nbsp; substances&nbsp; which&nbsp; are&nbsp; not&nbsp; to&nbsp; be&nbsp; made&nbsp; available&nbsp; to,&nbsp; or >>>> &nbsp;introduced,&nbsp; possessed&nbsp; or&nbsp; used&nbsp; by,&nbsp; members&nbsp; of&nbsp; the&nbsp; general >>>> public,&nbsp; whether&nbsp; on&nbsp; their&nbsp; own&nbsp; or&nbsp; in&nbsp; mixtures&nbsp; or&nbsp; substances&nbsp; that >>>> &nbsp;include those substances, unless the concentration is equal to or >>>> lower than the limit values set out in column 2, and for which >>>> suspicious transactions and significant disappearances and thefts&nbsp; are >>>> to&nbsp; be&nbsp; reported&nbsp; within&nbsp; 24&nbsp; hours" >>>> >>>> HNO3 in concentrations above 3% (old news) >>>> H2SO4 in concentrations above 15%. >>>> >>>> And, further: >>>> >>>> "List&nbsp; of&nbsp; substances&nbsp; on&nbsp; their&nbsp; own&nbsp; or&nbsp; in&nbsp; mixtures&nbsp; or&nbsp; in >>>> substances&nbsp; for&nbsp; which&nbsp; suspicious&nbsp; transactions&nbsp; and&nbsp; significant >>>> disappearances&nbsp; and&nbsp; thefts&nbsp; are&nbsp; to&nbsp; be&nbsp; reported&nbsp; within&nbsp; 24&nbsp; hours" >>>> >>>> *Acetone*, Potassium Nitrate, Sodium Nitrate, Calcium Nitrate. >>>> >>>> The regulation will have been effective by February. >>>> >>>> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Best regards, Piotr >>> >>> Stupid policy. Since there are ways to make concentrated sulphuric acid, >>> it won't prevent terrorists from getting it. But it will encourage >>> non-criminals who need it for other purposes to engage in dangerous >>> processes that wouldn't otherwise be required. > > I'm not sure it is all that stupid there have been a spate of acid > attacks using concentrated sulphuric acid in the not too distant past. > > https://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/london-is-acid-attack-hotspot-of-western-world-with-victims-as-young-as-10-a4222921.html > > The big problem is that quite a few of the chemicals they want to ban > have important and legitimate uses in gardening and agriculture. > Sulphur, charcoal, potassium nitrate, ammonium nitrate for example. > > When I lived in Belgium I was very surprised to see conc HCl, HNO3 and > H2SO4 on sale in the local supermarket and the shelf they were on > corroded to hell. Caustic gels are still on sale as drain cleaner. > >> I have a can of Extra Strength Acetone. That must really be dangerous. > > Only if you mix it with H2O2 carefully at the right temperature and live > to tell the tale. Strangely when I last bought some maximum UK permitted > strength peroxide Amazon helpfully suggested that I should buy some > acetone too! "Most people who bought this also bought that"...*REALLY!*
I can think of a profession that uses both substances. -- Jasen.
On 1/19/2021 5:08 PM, John Larkin wrote:
> On Tue, 19 Jan 2021 05:02:24 +0100, Gerhard Hoffmann <dk4xp@arcor.de> > wrote: > >> Am 19.01.21 um 04:26 schrieb Chris Jones: >> >>>>> Sulfuric acid has been difficult to buy privately where I live since as >>>>> long as I can remember. As a work-around, people buy lead-acid car >>>>> batteries, take the lids off and turn them upside down over a bucket to >>>>> get the acid out, and then throw away the empty battery part. The acid >>>>> will presumably be contaminated with lead, but would suffice for some >>>>> purposes. When I was young I needed sulfuric acid to make copper plating >>>>> solution, and got some from an old car battery. >>>> Do you live in india, where all the battery acid is used up on peoples >>>> faces? >>> No, Australia. >>>> motorcycle batteries frequently ship dry here, and you add the acid which >>>> is shipped separately. Not sure about the history for this. Maybe car >>>> batteries are too heavy to accidentally flip over during shipping? >> Pb batteries start to age when the acid is added. >> There is no danger of deep self discharge with sulfurication (sp?) as >> long as they are dry. If they are deep discharged you can only recycle >> them, they won't draw any current when trying to charge. > Mo left some lights on in her Fit. The battery was zero volts. I > bought a battery charger at an auto parts store and it would not > charge the battery; I think that's a scam to sell batteries. > > I charged it with a 1-amp lab supply for a few hours and it started > up. That battery lasted for another 3 or 4 years. >
When I was a kid, I worked at an automobile test equipment repair company. We had a no fix high current battery charger that I did fix in my spare time. It was one of those large units on wheels, it would do 300 amps at 10V.&nbsp; It had a solenoid operated protection circuit to prevent connecting it to a battery backwards. But this circuit also prevent it charging a dead battery. However, it had a push but switch, so If you were sure you had it connected properly and it was just a dead battery, you could push the switch that energized the solenoid and it would start to charge the dead battery. When I moved to Fl. I lived&nbsp; for a couple months in a small house before we bought, I stored a lot of belongings in an out building. Some lowlife creep thief stole my great battery charger! &nbsp;Can you add a bypass switch to fool your battery charger into charging a dead battery? &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Mikek -- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus
On Fri, 19 Nov 2021 06:57:54 -0600, amdx <amdx@knology.net> wrote:

>On 1/19/2021 5:08 PM, John Larkin wrote: >> On Tue, 19 Jan 2021 05:02:24 +0100, Gerhard Hoffmann <dk4xp@arcor.de> >> wrote: >> >>> Am 19.01.21 um 04:26 schrieb Chris Jones: >>> >>>>>> Sulfuric acid has been difficult to buy privately where I live since as >>>>>> long as I can remember. As a work-around, people buy lead-acid car >>>>>> batteries, take the lids off and turn them upside down over a bucket to >>>>>> get the acid out, and then throw away the empty battery part. The acid >>>>>> will presumably be contaminated with lead, but would suffice for some >>>>>> purposes. When I was young I needed sulfuric acid to make copper plating >>>>>> solution, and got some from an old car battery. >>>>> Do you live in india, where all the battery acid is used up on peoples >>>>> faces? >>>> No, Australia. >>>>> motorcycle batteries frequently ship dry here, and you add the acid which >>>>> is shipped separately. Not sure about the history for this. Maybe car >>>>> batteries are too heavy to accidentally flip over during shipping? >>> Pb batteries start to age when the acid is added. >>> There is no danger of deep self discharge with sulfurication (sp?) as >>> long as they are dry. If they are deep discharged you can only recycle >>> them, they won't draw any current when trying to charge. >> Mo left some lights on in her Fit. The battery was zero volts. I >> bought a battery charger at an auto parts store and it would not >> charge the battery; I think that's a scam to sell batteries. >> >> I charged it with a 1-amp lab supply for a few hours and it started >> up. That battery lasted for another 3 or 4 years. >> >When I was a kid, I worked at an automobile test equipment repair >company. We had a no fix high current battery charger > >that I did fix in my spare time. It was one of those large units on >wheels, it would do 300 amps at 10V.&#2013266080; It had a solenoid operated > >protection circuit to prevent connecting it to a battery backwards. But >this circuit also prevent it charging a dead battery. > >However, it had a push but switch, so If you were sure you had it >connected properly and it was just a dead battery, you could push the switch > >that energized the solenoid and it would start to charge the dead battery. > >When I moved to Fl. I lived&#2013266080; for a couple months in a small house before >we bought, I stored a lot of belongings in an out building. > >Some lowlife creep thief stole my great battery charger! > > &#2013266080;Can you add a bypass switch to fool your battery charger into charging >a dead battery? > > &#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080;&#2013266080; Mikek
I keep a bench power supply at home and in the cabin. It will charge a battery and do lots of other things. And you *can* charge a zero-volt totally dead car battery. The auto parts stores sell electronic chargers that won't, so that they can follow up by selling you a battery. -- Father Brown's figure remained quite dark and still; but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was always most valuable when he had lost it.
In article <sn870v$bm8$1@dont-email.me>, amdx@knology.net says...
> > &#2013266080;Can you add a bypass switch to fool your battery charger into charging > a dead battery? > > >
I let a car battery go dead because the car was not driven enough. My best charger would not let the battery start to charge. I have an older very simple charge that is only a transformer, diode and meter that I hooked to the battery for about half an hour and then I could use the better automatic charger.
On Fri, 19 Nov 2021 10:21:02 -0500, Ralph Mowery
<rmowery42@charter.net> wrote:

>In article <sn870v$bm8$1@dont-email.me>, amdx@knology.net says... >> >> &#2013266080;Can you add a bypass switch to fool your battery charger into charging >> a dead battery? >> >> >> > >I let a car battery go dead because the car was not driven enough. My >best charger would not let the battery start to charge. I have an older >very simple charge that is only a transformer, diode and meter that I >hooked to the battery for about half an hour and then I could use the >better automatic charger. >
I once had to use 120 VAC and a diode and a hair drier ballast resistor to bootstrap charging a car. Some devices with a 2-step dimmer have the necessary diode inside. -- Father Brown's figure remained quite dark and still; but in that instant he had lost his head. His head was always most valuable when he had lost it.
On Monday, January 18, 2021 at 8:38:54 AM UTC-8, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
> On Mon, 18 Jan 2021 05:36:19 -0500, bitrex <us...@example.net> wrote:
...
> >What was that story about like the Oregon society of PEs trying to get a > >dude banned from designing and selling his own electronics because he > >didn't have an "engineering license" to design and sell his own electronics? > > > >That was hilarious. > In some states, you can't call yourself an engineer unless you're an > official PE. > > And some states even allow coders to call themselves engineers!
I refer to coders as typists.