Forums

PC reliability

Started by legg January 13, 2020
John Robertson <spam@flippers.com> wrote in
news:Yd2dnY9O-Z5s04LDnZ2dnUU7-XXNnZ2d@giganews.com: 

> On 2020/01/13 11:21 a.m., Jeff Liebermann wrote: >> On Mon, 13 Jan 2020 08:20:18 -0500, legg <legg@nospam.magma.ca> >> wrote: >> >>> Is it just an impression, or are PC's not crashing as >>> regularly as they used to? >> >> Correct. PC's are no longer crashing in regular equally space >> intervals. Instead, a random number generator has been added to >> the crash(delay,random_seed), to produce random crashes instead. >> In some operating systems, these random crashes are part of the >> update process. The only thing regular about today's PC crashes >> is that they occur on the 2nd Tues of the month on Windoze >> machines. >> > > I hear that cars made in 1950 were more reliable than cars made in > 1910 too. (as in 2020 computers vs 1980 computers - 40 years of > evolution) > > Intelligent design? (ducking) > > John ;-#)# > >
It was all those prohibition years... And then the great depression... that spurred design innovation too. ;-)
On Tue, 14 Jan 2020 20:40:20 -0600, amdx <nojunk@knology.net> wrote:

>On 1/13/2020 1:25 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote: >> On Mon, 13 Jan 2020 11:58:22 -0600, amdx <nojunk@knology.net> wrote: >> >>> He needs 10 because Turbotax will not work on windows 7 in 2020. >>> Mikek >> >> Nope: >> "Windows 7 Support is Ending" >> <https://www.intuit.com/support/windows-7-end-of-life/> >> TurboTax for tax year 2019 and QuickBooks 2020 >> will install on Windows 7 (Service Pack 1 or later) >> PCs. >> >> So it is written, so it must be.
> Hmm, I'll blame that on my breakfast buddy, that was the >topic on Monday morning. He was talking about upgrading to 10, >because he uses Turbotax.
It's a common problem and common misconception. I'll worry about it next year, when it becomes a real problem.
> His solution is a dual boot using two separate Hard Drives. > He wants 7 because he has photo printer that only has 7 drivers, and >ham equipment that will only run on 7.
That won't work. If he uses his existing Windoze 7 activation code for the free upgrade to Windoze 10, the Win 7 license will magically expire in about 30 days. I'm not sure about the 30 days part, but I do know that his Win 7 will become deactivated after using Win 10 for some amount of time. I've never had anyone try it so methinks it's wise to double check this.
> I've been trying to get him to build a new computer, he built one in >2011, and he gave me his parts list and I built exactly the same thing.
Win 10 seems to need better and faster hardware than Win 7. If the hardware is 9 years old, Win 10 may not have drivers for everything. I say "may" because, except for video cards and printers, I haven't had much of a problem with Win 10 upgrades on older equipment.
> I think we are on borrowed time, but so far so good. I did need to oil >two Fans this week, that quieted them right down.
The fans will stay quiet for perhaps 3-6 months. Most fans on the market use some form of bushing. The one's that say "ball bearings" are usually bushing. There are some magnetic levitation "bearing" fans (Corsair, CUI, etc), but most are cheap sintered bronze bushings. When the oil either turns to tar or leaks out, the bushing wears out. When you re-oil it, you fill the gap between the shaft and bushing with oil, but it doesn't last because the shaft hole in the bushing is worn and has enlarged. You can continue oiling it, but the oil won't stay in the bushing. I suggest you buy a new fan and start over. -- Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
On Thursday, January 16, 2020 at 12:25:36 AM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Tue, 14 Jan 2020 20:40:20 -0600, amdx <nojunk@knology.net> wrote: > > >On 1/13/2020 1:25 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote: > >> On Mon, 13 Jan 2020 11:58:22 -0600, amdx <nojunk@knology.net> wrote: > >> > >>> He needs 10 because Turbotax will not work on windows 7 in 2020. > >>> Mikek > >> > >> Nope: > >> "Windows 7 Support is Ending" > >> <https://www.intuit.com/support/windows-7-end-of-life/> > >> TurboTax for tax year 2019 and QuickBooks 2020 > >> will install on Windows 7 (Service Pack 1 or later) > >> PCs. > >> > >> So it is written, so it must be. > > > Hmm, I'll blame that on my breakfast buddy, that was the > >topic on Monday morning. He was talking about upgrading to 10, > >because he uses Turbotax. > > It's a common problem and common misconception. I'll worry about it > next year, when it becomes a real problem. > > > His solution is a dual boot using two separate Hard Drives. > > He wants 7 because he has photo printer that only has 7 drivers, and > >ham equipment that will only run on 7. > > That won't work. If he uses his existing Windoze 7 activation code > for the free upgrade to Windoze 10, the Win 7 license will magically > expire in about 30 days. I'm not sure about the 30 days part, but I > do know that his Win 7 will become deactivated after using Win 10 for > some amount of time. I've never had anyone try it so methinks it's > wise to double check this. > > > I've been trying to get him to build a new computer, he built one in > >2011, and he gave me his parts list and I built exactly the same thing. > > Win 10 seems to need better and faster hardware than Win 7. If the > hardware is 9 years old, Win 10 may not have drivers for everything. I > say "may" because, except for video cards and printers, I haven't had > much of a problem with Win 10 upgrades on older equipment. > > > I think we are on borrowed time, but so far so good. I did need to oil > >two Fans this week, that quieted them right down. > > The fans will stay quiet for perhaps 3-6 months. Most fans on the > market use some form of bushing. The one's that say "ball bearings" > are usually bushing. There are some magnetic levitation "bearing" > fans (Corsair, CUI, etc), but most are cheap sintered bronze bushings. > When the oil either turns to tar or leaks out, the bushing wears out. > When you re-oil it, you fill the gap between the shaft and bushing > with oil, but it doesn't last because the shaft hole in the bushing is > worn and has enlarged. You can continue oiling it, but the oil won't > stay in the bushing. I suggest you buy a new fan and start over.
Microsoft rebooted my Win 7 Pro, 64 bit stem on the 14th to let me know that it was out of support. It has been problem free for several years. It has crashed three times in two days. Once it locked up. the other two were blue screens.
Michael Terrell <terrell.michael.a@gmail.com> wrote in
news:348e9a9b-2b25-4846-8b23-9ecfdc8965ca@googlegroups.com: 

> Microsoft rebooted my Win 7 Pro, 64 bit stem on the 14th to let me > know that it was out of support. It has been problem free for > several years. It has crashed three times in two days. Once it > locked up. the other two were blue screens. >
Win 7 anything is vulnerable. Maybe not MS that has hacked you. I would not get online with anything these days other than Linux or Win 10 fully updated on both. Or a smartphone, of course.
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 23:45:19 -0800 (PST), Michael Terrell
<terrell.michael.a@gmail.com> wrote:

>Microsoft rebooted my Win 7 Pro, 64 bit stem on the 14th to >let me know that it was out of support. It has been problem >free for several years. It has crashed three times in two days. >Once it locked up. the other two were blue screens.
The desktop I'm currently using at home runs Windoze 7. I saw the "Your Windoze 7 PC is out of support" message on the 14th. No crashes or problems. Just to be sure, I just ran quick Malwarebytes (free) and Avast Anti-virus (free) scans. Nothing found. I can't tell from here what broke your machine, but I suggest that you scan it with whatever anti-virus program you are using followed by some kind of anti-malware program scan. If you suspect that you might have a root-kit installed, look for specialized root kit detectors. <https://www.malwarebytes.com/antirootkit/> -- Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
On Thursday, January 16, 2020 at 3:50:46 AM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 23:45:19 -0800 (PST), Michael Terrell wrote: > > >Microsoft rebooted my Win 7 Pro, 64 bit stem on the 14th to > >let me know that it was out of support. It has been problem > >free for several years. It has crashed three times in two days. > >Once it locked up. the other two were blue screens. > > The desktop I'm currently using at home runs Windoze 7. I saw the > "Your Windoze 7 PC is out of support" message on the 14th. No crashes > or problems. Just to be sure, I just ran quick Malwarebytes (free) > and Avast Anti-virus (free) scans. Nothing found. > > I can't tell from here what broke your machine, but I suggest that you > scan it with whatever anti-virus program you are using followed by > some kind of anti-malware program scan. If you suspect that you might > have a root-kit installed, look for specialized root kit detectors. > <https://www.malwarebytes.com/antirootkit/>
I have run them and found nothing. I was getting ready to build a newer system. I have a quad core 3.0GHz MB with 16GB of RAM and a pair of new 3TB hard drives sitting here. I just haven't felt well enough to rip apart my mess of systems to make room for it. The desk has 5 computers, three 24" monitors and two, four drive NAS boxes. I would tear down the entire mess and rearrange everything to make it neater. It would also eliminate a lot of abandoned cabling. Thanks to a bad VA doctor, I went without my prescriptions for two months, starting early September. I still have trouble eating, and readjusting to the drugs. I go upto five days at a time, that I simply can't eat. I'm not going to tackle the rebuild, until, and if I ever feel well enough. Like many others here, it is time to start thinning the herd. My family would just rent a dumpster or leave my workshop unlocked so people would steal what they thought they could pawn.
On Wednesday, January 15, 2020 at 9:25:36 PM UTC-8, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

> The fans will stay quiet for perhaps 3-6 months. Most fans on the > market use some form of bushing. The one's that say "ball bearings" > are usually bushing. There are some magnetic levitation "bearing" > fans (Corsair, CUI, etc), but most are cheap sintered bronze bushings. > When the oil either turns to tar or leaks out, the bushing wears out. > When you re-oil it, you fill the gap between the shaft and bushing > with oil, but it doesn't last because the shaft hole in the bushing is > worn and has enlarged. You can continue oiling it, but the oil won't > stay in the bushing. I suggest you buy a new fan and start over.
I've had good results with Tri-Flow (a lubricant with PTFE microspheres) at quieting bushing fans; the solids really do fill in the gaps for a long time. I always peel the label and pry off the seal, don't know if it works with needle injection.
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:
> Michael Terrell <terrell.michael.a@gmail.com> wrote in > news:348e9a9b-2b25-4846-8b23-9ecfdc8965ca@googlegroups.com: > >> Microsoft rebooted my Win 7 Pro, 64 bit stem on the 14th to let me >> know that it was out of support. It has been problem free for >> several years. It has crashed three times in two days. Once it >> locked up. the other two were blue screens. >> > > Win 7 anything is vulnerable. Maybe not MS that has hacked you. I > would not get online with anything these days other than Linux or Win > 10 fully updated on both. Or a smartphone, of course. >
Well, even a Samsung Galaxy J2 balked at entry of password into a Godaddy account. So, "of course" is incorrect at best.
Michael Terrell wrote:
> On Thursday, January 16, 2020 at 12:25:36 AM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote: >> On Tue, 14 Jan 2020 20:40:20 -0600, amdx <nojunk@knology.net> wrote: >> >>> On 1/13/2020 1:25 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote: >>>> On Mon, 13 Jan 2020 11:58:22 -0600, amdx <nojunk@knology.net> wrote: >>>> >>>>> He needs 10 because Turbotax will not work on windows 7 in 2020. >>>>> Mikek >>>> >>>> Nope: >>>> "Windows 7 Support is Ending" >>>> <https://www.intuit.com/support/windows-7-end-of-life/> >>>> TurboTax for tax year 2019 and QuickBooks 2020 >>>> will install on Windows 7 (Service Pack 1 or later) >>>> PCs. >>>> >>>> So it is written, so it must be. >> >>> Hmm, I'll blame that on my breakfast buddy, that was the >>> topic on Monday morning. He was talking about upgrading to 10, >>> because he uses Turbotax. >> >> It's a common problem and common misconception. I'll worry about it >> next year, when it becomes a real problem. >> >>> His solution is a dual boot using two separate Hard Drives. >>> He wants 7 because he has photo printer that only has 7 drivers, and >>> ham equipment that will only run on 7. >> >> That won't work. If he uses his existing Windoze 7 activation code >> for the free upgrade to Windoze 10, the Win 7 license will magically >> expire in about 30 days. I'm not sure about the 30 days part, but I >> do know that his Win 7 will become deactivated after using Win 10 for >> some amount of time. I've never had anyone try it so methinks it's >> wise to double check this. >> >>> I've been trying to get him to build a new computer, he built one in >>> 2011, and he gave me his parts list and I built exactly the same thing. >> >> Win 10 seems to need better and faster hardware than Win 7. If the >> hardware is 9 years old, Win 10 may not have drivers for everything. I >> say "may" because, except for video cards and printers, I haven't had >> much of a problem with Win 10 upgrades on older equipment. >> >>> I think we are on borrowed time, but so far so good. I did need to oil >>> two Fans this week, that quieted them right down. >> >> The fans will stay quiet for perhaps 3-6 months. Most fans on the >> market use some form of bushing. The one's that say "ball bearings" >> are usually bushing. There are some magnetic levitation "bearing" >> fans (Corsair, CUI, etc), but most are cheap sintered bronze bushings. >> When the oil either turns to tar or leaks out, the bushing wears out. >> When you re-oil it, you fill the gap between the shaft and bushing >> with oil, but it doesn't last because the shaft hole in the bushing is >> worn and has enlarged. You can continue oiling it, but the oil won't >> stay in the bushing. I suggest you buy a new fan and start over. > > > > > > > > > > Microsoft rebooted my Win 7 Pro, 64 bit stem on the 14th to let me know that it was out of support. It has been problem free for several years. It has crashed three times in two days. Once it locked up. the other two were blue screens. >
** from alt.computer ng: ** Robert Baer wrote: > Copied from a posting in sci.electronics.design: > > ** COPY ** > > Hmm, I'll blame that on my breakfast buddy, that was the > > topic on Monday morning. He was talking about upgrading to 10, > > because he uses Turbotax. > > It's a common problem and common misconception. I'll worry about it > next year, when it becomes a real problem. > > > His solution is a dual boot using two separate Hard Drives. > > He wants 7 because he has photo printer that only has 7 drivers, and > > ham equipment that will only run on 7. > > That won't work. If he uses his existing Windoze 7 activation code > for the free upgrade to Windoze 10, the Win 7 license will magically > expire in about 30 days. I'm not sure about the 30 days part, but I > do know that his Win 7 will become deactivated after using Win 10 for > some amount of time. I've never had anyone try it so methinks it's > wise to double check this. > > > I've been trying to get him to build a new computer, he built one in > > 2011, and he gave me his parts list and I built exactly the same thing. > > Win 10 seems to need better and faster hardware than Win 7. If the > hardware is 9 years old, Win 10 may not have drivers for everything. I > say "may" because, except for video cards and printers, I haven't had > much of a problem with Win 10 upgrades on older equipment. > ** END COPY ** > > NOTE the funny business happening to Win7 if one "upgrades" to Win10. > And that would happen even if one used a new, separate machine. > M$ strikes again. > 1) There is a lot of similarity between the kernel portions of Vista, Win7, Win8, Win10. In particular, the minimum RAM needed. The more modern the OS gets, the more it tends to "reserve" maybe 10% of performance for its own usage (responsiveness). This can be overcome by forking twice as many execution threads. 7ZIP compression will run faster on a four core processor, if you set the thread count to 8, then if you set the thread count to 4. With thread count 8, the CPU finally runs at 100% in your favor. This is "oversubscription", because it means two 7ZIP threads "fight" for time slices on one virtual core, and it helps squeeze out the bad habits of the OS. On a 6C 12T processor, you set 7ZIP to 24 threads, so the 12 virtual cores have 2 threads each. In typical Microsoft fashion, the notion of "kernel optimization" or "scheduling changes so Ryzen gives its full potential", are delivered with glacial speed. Which implies it takes a lot of testing for even the most trivial improvements. Many claims of kernel or scheduler improvements have appeared over the years, where we're not really sure whether they happened or not. 2) Each OS has a different set of services. Many of the services are the same. Windows Defender is different. Windows Defender in Windows 10 offers realtime AV protection. In Windows 7 it offered some sort of "spyware protection". Some services place a load on the system when they operate, or "interfere" with performance. For example, running hashdeep64.exe may run 7x slower, because Windows Defender is scanning each file that hashdeep64 has open for reads. If you own Windows 10 Pro, you can reach down with GPEDIT32.MSC and turn off Windows Defender and do your hashdeep64 tree scan in peace and quiet. In 1909, the control that claims to turn off real time protection in the GUI, is similar to a "broken light switch". Whereas the Pro SKU and GPEDIT32.MSC still works. This may give the impression that more CPU is required. You can tune W10 so it matches W7 on performance. You can even BlackViper Windows 10, because you can BlackViper just about anything. 3) Task Manager is not very effective in emergency conditions. Windows 10 may tempt you to push the reset button or power off the computer, when the keyboard/mouse no longer give control over the computer. Windows XP was the last OS with "virtuous" computer control (in users favor). 4) The qualifying Windows 7 license *does not* deactivate when the Digital Entitlement for free Windows 10 is acquired. You can have Windows 7 in one partition, Windows 10 in a second partition, and both boot. And both claim they are Genuine. If your Windows 7 is Retail Boxed, and you move the OS to a brand new machine, *then* just about anything could happen to the copy of Windows 10 on the old machine. I don't have Retail Boxed 7 to test for "license amplification" like that. *No* OS has deactivated here in all the time I've been testing multiple OS installations on my two active computers. I have not tried to "spew" my Win7Pro System Builder all over the house and make it run everything from one copy. That is *asking* for trouble. You have the option of using some "activator" of course, if that is how you run your computer room, and some are doing that. So if you thought Microsoft had "stolen" your license, you could fix it with an activator. However, if you're running a dozen computers off one Retail Boxed Windows 7 product simultaneously, that's wrong. We can't blame Microsoft for being upset, if that's what you're doing. Some STEM graduates seem to have poor counting skills when it comes to license adherence :-/ Then they may make certain claims on the Interwibble. 5) Windows 10 saw more work done on Hyper-V. It would be all too simple for Microsoft to leave Hyper-V in the architecture even when it is not being used. However, I've not seen any indirect evidence that such a thing is present or causing a problem. Not every machine has SLAT/EPT, and the desktop version of Hyper-V makes having that a requirement (so the graphics card will work better with the various parts of the software stack). The block diagram for Hyper-V is quite confusing - it's supposed to be a different class of Hypervisor than previous ones, yet the block diagram doesn't make it look like the "Host" OS is also virtualized. That was my main concern with some of the descriptions I was reading. 6) Using debuggers, I have seen "shit behavior" in the new OS. It's up to every user of Windows 10 to make observations and reach their own conclusions about whether "this is our best OS yet". The desktop graphics system has a memory garbage collector of some sort, and attempting to double click an icon and start a program can be delayed until a garbage collector run completes. On my Test Machine, the time for this operation is *20 seconds*, and that's the max program launch latency here. There were some previous versions of the OS where something else was happening, leading to extremely long (60 second) start times. Again, this might lead some to conclude a "faster CPU" is required - they're wrong in fact - a faster CPU does *not* help when the bad parts of the architecture rail the machine. Typical architectural holes cause railing of one core, while the other cores remain dormant until something kernel-like or close to the metal, is finished. The "Chrome build behavior" still isn't fixed, and launching thousands of processes as happens during software compiles of large projects, still shows egregious behavior. But if all you do is update your Facebook page, you'll never notice. This is what happens if you attempt installation of Windows 10 on an old Pentium 4 system. As part of this experiment, this may have been launched from the DVD, while Windows 7 (unactivated) was running the system. It was an attempt to verify that the install assistant does the normal things, on older hardware. One or two of the very last P4 family processors, are supposed to be able to pass this test, but I've yet to see a positive report of such a thing, anywhere. I think this is a P4 1.8GHz at FSB400 with 1GB RAM (no Hyperthreading). This is what happens when you try to install Windows 10 on year 2002 hardware (the machine has enough RAM to run Windows 10 or Windows 7, but otherwise doesn't meet the requirements). https://i.postimg.cc/2ykKyy6K/dvd-1909-setup-check-no-NX.gif An SSD for storage is recommended for the boot drive on Win10. You'll hate yourself, if you continue to use some older hard drive that reads at 65MB/sec. (That's what the above test was run on.) Paul
Robert Baer <robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote in
news:p%cUF.73691$Gh7.33798@fx45.iad: 

> DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote: >> Michael Terrell <terrell.michael.a@gmail.com> wrote in >> news:348e9a9b-2b25-4846-8b23-9ecfdc8965ca@googlegroups.com: >> >>> Microsoft rebooted my Win 7 Pro, 64 bit stem on the 14th to let >>> me know that it was out of support. It has been problem free >>> for several years. It has crashed three times in two days. Once >>> it locked up. the other two were blue screens. >>> >> >> Win 7 anything is vulnerable. Maybe not MS that has hacked >> you. I >> would not get online with anything these days other than Linux or >> Win 10 fully updated on both. Or a smartphone, of course. >> > Well, even a Samsung Galaxy J2 balked at entry of password into > a > Godaddy account. > So, "of course" is incorrect at best. >
So, you think your phone got hacked? I think you need to reread what was written. Otherwise, maybe your phone kept you from being hacked when you tried to access a shit site. Godaddy to me has alway been a rip off. We should be able to get domain names without paying some jackass for it. Doesn't matter how large they have grown. There are a lot of folks willing to accept being screwed.