Forums

PC reliability

Started by legg January 13, 2020
Is it just an impression, or are PC's not crashing as 
regularly as they used to?

Looking at the machines here, it seems that this shift 
occurred roughly around the time IDE HDDs were replaced 
by SATA.

With three machines, I used to expect to have a clunk HDD 
at least once a year, if not just cloned to a larger drive.

Haven't had a HDD fail since 2011. 

What goes?

RL
legg <legg@nospam.magma.ca> wrote:

> Is it just an impression, or are PC's not crashing as > regularly as they used to? > > Looking at the machines here, it seems that this shift > occurred roughly around the time IDE HDDs were replaced > by SATA. > > With three machines, I used to expect to have a clunk HDD > at least once a year, if not just cloned to a larger drive. > > Haven't had a HDD fail since 2011. > > What goes?
It's Windows. Crashing was radically reduced with Windows XP back in about 2000. Nowadays, occasional rebooting is apparently still useful, but the blue screen of death (BSOD) or any other system freeze almost never happens anymore.
John Doe <always.look@message.header> wrote in news:qvht1c$c5r$1@dont-
email.me:

> Nowadays, occasional rebooting is apparently still useful,
Why? "Memory leaks"? Naaah... I think Windows has been doing pretty good since the Windows 8 to Windows 10 upgrade. Just keep it updated to foil the retarded hacks. No need really to reboot that I have ever heard. I sgut my machine off because it chews up juice and dirties up the heat sink tines inside, and laptops are a PITA to keep clean so it runs cool and keeps a long life. My current laptop is a 6 core, 12 pipe Xeon with an Nvidia Quadro GOU, so keeping it cool is a good thing. So I turn it off when I am not using it.
On Monday, January 13, 2020 at 8:58:12 AM UTC-5, John Doe wrote:
> legg <legg@nospam.magma.ca> wrote: > > > Is it just an impression, or are PC's not crashing as > > regularly as they used to? > > > > Looking at the machines here, it seems that this shift > > occurred roughly around the time IDE HDDs were replaced > > by SATA. > > > > With three machines, I used to expect to have a clunk HDD > > at least once a year, if not just cloned to a larger drive. > > > > Haven't had a HDD fail since 2011. > > > > What goes? > > It's Windows. Crashing was radically reduced with Windows XP back in > about 2000. Nowadays, occasional rebooting is apparently still useful, > but the blue screen of death (BSOD) or any other system freeze almost > never happens anymore.
+1 That's how I see it, Windows has improved over time.
On 2020-01-13 08:20, legg wrote:
> Is it just an impression, or are PC's not crashing as > regularly as they used to? > > Looking at the machines here, it seems that this shift > occurred roughly around the time IDE HDDs were replaced > by SATA. > > With three machines, I used to expect to have a clunk HDD > at least once a year, if not just cloned to a larger drive. > > Haven't had a HDD fail since 2011. > > What goes?
About five years ago I standardized on a Hitachi 1.5 TB drive, and now have about a dozen of them. I had one early failure in a RAID-5 NAS, but they've all been running flawlessly since then. (The failure was in a device used as a hot spare, so I didn't even have to reconstruct the array.) I have three Supermicro servers with H8DGI-F mobos and dual 12-core AMD Magny Cours processors, and 40 to 64GB of ECCC memory. I had one power supply go mammaries-topmost, but everything else has worked flawlessly. I like them because they have a lot of grunt (250 GFLOPS), excellent main-memory bandwidth for FDTD electromagnetic sims, legacy BIOS, IOMMU (equivalent to Intel's VTx/VTd) and they don't have anything resembling the Intel management unit backdoor. They do eat a bit of power though. For laptops, I have several Thinkpad T4xx units. They have shorter lives than the Supermicros because they get a lot harder use--you don't usually drop servers on the floor and break the display. :( Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 http://electrooptical.net http://hobbs-eo.com
On 2020-01-13 10:20, Phil Hobbs wrote:
> On 2020-01-13 08:20, legg wrote: >> Is it just an impression, or are PC's not crashing as >> regularly as they used to? >> >> Looking at the machines here, it seems that this shift >> occurred roughly around the time IDE HDDs were replaced >> by SATA. >> >> With three machines, I used to expect to have a clunk HDD >> at least once a year, if not just cloned to a larger drive. >> >> Haven't had a HDD fail since 2011. >> >> What goes? > > About five years ago I standardized on a Hitachi 1.5 TB drive, and now > have about a dozen of them.&nbsp; I had one early failure in a RAID-5 NAS, > but they've all been running flawlessly since then.&nbsp; (The failure was in > a device used as a hot spare, so I didn't even have to reconstruct the > array.) > > I have three Supermicro servers with H8DGI-F mobos and dual 12-core AMD > Magny Cours processors, and 40 to 64GB of ECCC memory.&nbsp; I had one power > supply go mammaries-topmost, but everything else has worked flawlessly. > > I like them because they have a lot of grunt (250 GFLOPS), excellent > main-memory bandwidth for FDTD electromagnetic sims, legacy BIOS, IOMMU > (equivalent to Intel's VTx/VTd) and they don't have anything resembling > the Intel management unit backdoor. > > They do eat a bit of power though. > > For laptops, I have several Thinkpad T4xx units.&nbsp; They have shorter > lives than the Supermicros because they get a lot harder use--you don't > usually drop servers on the floor and break the display. :(
Oh, and they run Qubes OS or CentOS Linux, no Windows at all. Cheers Phil Hobbs (Posting from Qubes OS) -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 http://electrooptical.net http://hobbs-eo.com
On 01/13/2020 02:20 PM, legg wrote:
> Is it just an impression, or are PC's not crashing as > regularly as they used to? > > Looking at the machines here, it seems that this shift > occurred roughly around the time IDE HDDs were replaced > by SATA. > > With three machines, I used to expect to have a clunk HDD > at least once a year, if not just cloned to a larger drive. > > Haven't had a HDD fail since 2011. > > What goes? > > RL >
My guess is that the power grid became more stable. I still have a bunch of PATAs in use. One SATA which often makes a few clicks too many on bootup.
On 13.01.20 14:20, legg wrote:
> Is it just an impression, or are PC's not crashing as > regularly as they used to? > > Looking at the machines here, it seems that this shift > occurred roughly around the time IDE HDDs were replaced > by SATA. > > With three machines, I used to expect to have a clunk HDD > at least once a year, if not just cloned to a larger drive. > > Haven't had a HDD fail since 2011. > > What goes? > > RL >
Have not had any HD failure from 1980 to today. Running out of storage space was the main reason to get another set of disks.
Johann Klammer <klammerj@NOSPAM.a1.net> wrote in news:qvi6sj$4c8$1
@gioia.aioe.org:

> On 01/13/2020 02:20 PM, legg wrote: >> Is it just an impression, or are PC's not crashing as >> regularly as they used to? >> >> Looking at the machines here, it seems that this shift >> occurred roughly around the time IDE HDDs were replaced >> by SATA. >> >> With three machines, I used to expect to have a clunk HDD >> at least once a year, if not just cloned to a larger drive. >> >> Haven't had a HDD fail since 2011. >> >> What goes? >> >> RL >> > My guess is that the power grid became more stable. > I still have a bunch of PATAs in use. > One SATA which often makes a few clicks too many on bootup. >
Well, it sure is NOT because of power grid spike/sag reduction. That is just plain silly. Otherwise nations with noisey grids would show huge differences, and they do not. Power grid spikes/sags are not making it into your PC's rails. Silliest thing I've heard in a while.
On 2020-01-13 09:16, Sjouke Burry wrote:
> On 13.01.20 14:20, legg wrote: >> Is it just an impression, or are PC's not crashing as >> regularly as they used to? >> >> Looking at the machines here, it seems that this shift >> occurred roughly around the time IDE HDDs were replaced >> by SATA. >> >> With three machines, I used to expect to have a clunk HDD >> at least once a year, if not just cloned to a larger drive. >> >> Haven't had a HDD fail since 2011. >> >> What goes? >> >> RL >> > Have not had any HD failure from 1980 to today. > Running out of storage space was the main reason to > get another set of disks.
I had five AFAIR. Three were due to harsh traveling (pilot "nailed" it onto the runway et cetera), two were stationary out-of-the-blue failures. -- Regards, Joerg http://www.analogconsultants.com/