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The Transistor will Never Work

Started by Unlisted October 14, 2019
Its been over 70 years since scientists began trying to invent a device
to replace vacuum tubes. This device was named the TRANSISTOR. While
it's a catchy name, it failed to work as predicted. How these scientists
ever expected a piece of rock inside a container, with wires attached,
to control the flow of electrons, is a mystery. After all, its a known
fact that rocks do not conduct electricity. But these scientists dreamed
it would work, and never gave up on this flawed experiment.

Its 2019. over 70 years since this ridiculous concept was dreamed up.
Yet, today they have still not been able to make this device work. It's
impractical. It simply wont work. If and when they finally give up on
this senseless experiment, maybe they will finally develop vacuum tubes
that meet today's needs and are smaller in size and longer lasting.

With any hope, the 2020s will bring science back to their senses. Maybe
they will give up on trying to send electric current thru rocks and
realize they must use metals. Its a bright frontier, but nothing will
change until these scientists abandon the transistor and move on to a
totally new design.

On 10/14/19 6:41 PM, Unlisted wrote:
> Its been over 70 years since scientists began trying to invent a device > to replace vacuum tubes. This device was named the TRANSISTOR. While > it's a catchy name, it failed to work as predicted. How these scientists > ever expected a piece of rock inside a container, with wires attached, > to control the flow of electrons, is a mystery. After all, its a known > fact that rocks do not conduct electricity. But these scientists dreamed > it would work, and never gave up on this flawed experiment. > > Its 2019. over 70 years since this ridiculous concept was dreamed up. > Yet, today they have still not been able to make this device work. It's > impractical. It simply wont work. If and when they finally give up on > this senseless experiment, maybe they will finally develop vacuum tubes > that meet today's needs and are smaller in size and longer lasting. > > With any hope, the 2020s will bring science back to their senses. Maybe > they will give up on trying to send electric current thru rocks and > realize they must use metals. Its a bright frontier, but nothing will > change until these scientists abandon the transistor and move on to a > totally new design. >
it provoked mild amusement but one of this troll's weaker efforts, unfortunately. 3/10
Unlisted <unlisted@nomail.com> wrote in 
news:6bu9qe18a1mjak6jtjmrbas8pe0cjtbicl@4ax.com:

> Its been over 70 years since
So, you are a TechnoTroll? Or a NoTechTroll... wannabe.
On Monday, October 14, 2019 at 4:30:44 PM UTC-7, bitrex wrote:
> On 10/14/19 6:41 PM, Unlisted wrote: > > Its been over 70 years since scientists began trying to invent a device > > to replace vacuum tubes. This device was named the TRANSISTOR. While > > it's a catchy name, it failed to work as predicted. How these scientists > > ever expected a piece of rock inside a container, with wires attached, > > to control the flow of electrons, is a mystery. After all, its a known > > fact that rocks do not conduct electricity. But these scientists dreamed > > it would work, and never gave up on this flawed experiment. > > > > Its 2019. over 70 years since this ridiculous concept was dreamed up. > > Yet, today they have still not been able to make this device work. It's > > impractical. It simply wont work. If and when they finally give up on > > this senseless experiment, maybe they will finally develop vacuum tubes > > that meet today's needs and are smaller in size and longer lasting. > > > > With any hope, the 2020s will bring science back to their senses. Maybe > > they will give up on trying to send electric current thru rocks and > > realize they must use metals. Its a bright frontier, but nothing will > > change until these scientists abandon the transistor and move on to a > > totally new design. > > > > it provoked mild amusement but one of this troll's weaker efforts, > unfortunately. 3/10
They should have used carbon in stead of silicon, then it would work. It's April 1 already?
edward...@gmail.com wrote:

--------------------------
> > > They should have used carbon in stead of silicon, then it would work. >
** Small point: The first transistors used a Germanium crystal ( a rock ?) with a pair of gold "cat's whiskers" in 1947. The first silicon junction device came along about 7 years later. .... Phil
On Tue, 15 Oct 2019 00:19:51 +0000 (UTC),
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:

>Unlisted <unlisted@nomail.com> wrote in >news:6bu9qe18a1mjak6jtjmrbas8pe0cjtbicl@4ax.com: > >> Its been over 70 years since > > So, you are a TechnoTroll? > > Or a NoTechTroll... wannabe.
Don't worry, AlwaysWrong. You have the real version nailed down.
Unlisted wrote:
> Its been over 70 years since scientists began trying to invent a device > to replace vacuum tubes. This device was named the TRANSISTOR. While > it's a catchy name, it failed to work as predicted. How these scientists > ever expected a piece of rock inside a container, with wires attached, > to control the flow of electrons, is a mystery. After all, its a known > fact that rocks do not conduct electricity. But these scientists dreamed > it would work, and never gave up on this flawed experiment. > > Its 2019. over 70 years since this ridiculous concept was dreamed up. > Yet, today they have still not been able to make this device work. It's > impractical. It simply wont work. If and when they finally give up on > this senseless experiment, maybe they will finally develop vacuum tubes > that meet today's needs and are smaller in size and longer lasting. > > With any hope, the 2020s will bring science back to their senses. Maybe > they will give up on trying to send electric current thru rocks and > realize they must use metals. Its a bright frontier, but nothing will > change until these scientists abandon the transistor and move on to a > totally new design. >
But...vacuums conduct even LESS current! So, your proposal make even less sense.
On Tuesday, 15 October 2019 00:30:44 UTC+1, bitrex  wrote:
> On 10/14/19 6:41 PM, Unlisted wrote: > > Its been over 70 years since scientists began trying to invent a device > > to replace vacuum tubes. This device was named the TRANSISTOR. While > > it's a catchy name, it failed to work as predicted. How these scientists > > ever expected a piece of rock inside a container, with wires attached, > > to control the flow of electrons, is a mystery. After all, its a known > > fact that rocks do not conduct electricity. But these scientists dreamed > > it would work, and never gave up on this flawed experiment. > > > > Its 2019. over 70 years since this ridiculous concept was dreamed up. > > Yet, today they have still not been able to make this device work. It's > > impractical. It simply wont work. If and when they finally give up on > > this senseless experiment, maybe they will finally develop vacuum tubes > > that meet today's needs and are smaller in size and longer lasting. > > > > With any hope, the 2020s will bring science back to their senses. Maybe > > they will give up on trying to send electric current thru rocks and > > realize they must use metals. Its a bright frontier, but nothing will > > change until these scientists abandon the transistor and move on to a > > totally new design. > > > > it provoked mild amusement but one of this troll's weaker efforts, > unfortunately. 3/10
it's been done, the nuvistor. NT
On 10/16/19 6:03 AM, tabbypurr@gmail.com wrote:
> On Tuesday, 15 October 2019 00:30:44 UTC+1, bitrex wrote: >> On 10/14/19 6:41 PM, Unlisted wrote: >>> Its been over 70 years since scientists began trying to invent a device >>> to replace vacuum tubes. This device was named the TRANSISTOR. While >>> it's a catchy name, it failed to work as predicted. How these scientists >>> ever expected a piece of rock inside a container, with wires attached, >>> to control the flow of electrons, is a mystery. After all, its a known >>> fact that rocks do not conduct electricity. But these scientists dreamed >>> it would work, and never gave up on this flawed experiment. >>> >>> Its 2019. over 70 years since this ridiculous concept was dreamed up. >>> Yet, today they have still not been able to make this device work. It's >>> impractical. It simply wont work. If and when they finally give up on >>> this senseless experiment, maybe they will finally develop vacuum tubes >>> that meet today's needs and are smaller in size and longer lasting. >>> >>> With any hope, the 2020s will bring science back to their senses. Maybe >>> they will give up on trying to send electric current thru rocks and >>> realize they must use metals. Its a bright frontier, but nothing will >>> change until these scientists abandon the transistor and move on to a >>> totally new design. >>> >> >> it provoked mild amusement but one of this troll's weaker efforts, >> unfortunately. 3/10 > > it's been done, the nuvistor. > > > NT >
I read they assembled them robotic-ally inside a hard vacuum chamber because there wasn't any good way to remove the air after they were sealed up. I thought there might be a vid of the process on the web but can't seem to find any, and I'd imagine the production hardware was all scrapped before I was born. :(
bitrex wrote:
----------------

> it's been done, the nuvistor. > > > > > > > I read they assembled them robotic-ally inside a hard vacuum chamber > because there wasn't any good way to remove the air after they were > sealed up. >\
** Yep - fitting the outer cover and sealing it to the ceramic base was done under hard vacuum. Lots of good detail here: http://www.r-type.org/articles/art-150.htm Though I could find no cite - Nuvistors must owe a lot to the super rugged tubes produced for use in "proximity fuses". Mini VHF types, fitted inside artillery shells, blasted out the barrel at 20,000G. ..... Phil