Forums

Flash website - end of an era

Started by Unknown October 6, 2019
Over 10 years ago I started a website ( www.fourier-series.com)in which I built interactive flash programs to teach various engineering concepts. I Initially designed these programs to personally understand DSP and then to pass along what I learned to others****. These topics were fourier series, discrete fourier series, fourier transforms filtering I/Q modulation and also some RF stuff most notably the smith chart.

I produced content aggressively for about three years (2008-2011).  At the websites height I received about 2 emails per week and had about 3G of downloads per day. My site also produced great returns for web searches (typically #1,2 or 3) on the topics I covered.  Many professors linked to my pages.  In about 2012 I got burned out on this but kept the content up.  The site peaked in about 2013 or 2014 and then has had a slow decline in popularity and hits.  I still get traffic , but it is way down.  I get an occasional letter but it is very occasional.

At the end of this year most browsers will be disabling flash and I will be sun setting my website.  

Was it worth it?  I received No money for it ever.  I learned a ton about the topics for myself and I got over one hundred letters thanking me for helping them understand various topics.

Life moves on.









***** I had always considered myself an RF/radio engineer.  About 15 years ago I was really becoming uncomfortable because it was becoming clear that the future of radio was DSP and how could I call myself a radio engineer if I did not really know DSP. From there I embarked on the loooong journey to try to really understand the fundamentals of DSP.
In message <a2022adc-18d0-4583-a7bc-ce2efc45c49e@googlegroups.com>, 
blocher@columbus.rr.com writes
>Over 10 years ago I started a website ( www.fourier-series.com)in which >I built interactive flash programs to teach various engineering >concepts. I Initially designed these programs to personally understand >DSP and then to pass along what I learned to others****. These topics >were fourier series, discrete fourier series, fourier transforms >filtering I/Q modulation and also some RF stuff most notably the smith >chart. > >I produced content aggressively for about three years (2008-2011). At >the websites height I received about 2 emails per week and had about 3G >of downloads per day. My site also produced great returns for web >searches (typically #1,2 or 3) on the topics I covered. Many >professors linked to my pages. In about 2012 I got burned out on this >but kept the content up. The site peaked in about 2013 or 2014 and >then has had a slow decline in popularity and hits. I still get >traffic , but it is way down. I get an occasional letter but it is >very occasional. > >At the end of this year most browsers will be disabling flash and I >will be sun setting my website. > >Was it worth it? I received No money for it ever. I learned a ton >about the topics for myself and I got over one hundred letters thanking >me for helping them understand various topics. > >Life moves on. > > > > > > > > > >***** I had always considered myself an RF/radio engineer. About 15 >years ago I was really becoming uncomfortable because it was becoming >clear that the future of radio was DSP and how could I call myself a >radio engineer if I did not really know DSP. From there I embarked on >the loooong journey to try to really understand the fundamentals of DSP.
Interesting site. Brian -- Brian Howie
<blocher@columbus.rr.com> wrote:
> Over 10 years ago I started a website ( www.fourier-series.com)in which I > built interactive flash programs to teach various engineering concepts. I > Initially designed these programs to personally understand DSP and then > to pass along what I learned to others****. These topics were fourier > series, discrete fourier series, fourier transforms filtering I/Q > modulation and also some RF stuff most notably the smith chart. > > I produced content aggressively for about three years (2008-2011). At > the websites height I received about 2 emails per week and had about 3G > of downloads per day. My site also produced great returns for web > searches (typically #1,2 or 3) on the topics I covered. Many professors > linked to my pages. In about 2012 I got burned out on this but kept the > content up. The site peaked in about 2013 or 2014 and then has had a > slow decline in popularity and hits. I still get traffic , but it is way > down. I get an occasional letter but it is very occasional. > > At the end of this year most browsers will be disabling flash and I will > be sun setting my website. > > Was it worth it? I received No money for it ever. I learned a ton about > the topics for myself and I got over one hundred letters thanking me for > helping them understand various topics. > > Life moves on. > > > > > > > > > > ***** I had always considered myself an RF/radio engineer. About 15 > years ago I was really becoming uncomfortable because it was becoming > clear that the future of radio was DSP and how could I call myself a > radio engineer if I did not really know DSP. From there I embarked on the > loooong journey to try to really understand the fundamentals of DSP. >
Maybe get in touch with Jason Scott at Internet Archive (@textfiles on Twitter) and see if he&rsquo;d assist in preserving your work. I&rsquo;m 100% positive he would be interested, or at least would be able to point you at somebody who is already running a project to preserve Flash content. Don&rsquo;t let it simply fade away! -- M0TEY // STC www.twitter.com/ukradioamateur
On 7/10/19 5:33 am, blocher@columbus.rr.com wrote:
> Over 10 years ago I started a website ( www.fourier-series.com)in which I built interactive flash programs...[snip] > At the end of this year most browsers will be disabling flash and I
will be sun setting my website.> Life moves on. Publish the source code, with a copyright requesting acknowledgment for derived works. If your code is readable, someone will pick it up and make modern versions (using SVG, etc). Who knows, I might even do some myself. My impedance nomograph seems to have been widely appreciated here, even though no-one *ever* has pressed the Donate button :) <http://polyplex.org/electronics/nomograph/> Clifford Heath.
On Monday, 7 October 2019 03:08:13 UTC+1, Clifford Heath  wrote:
> On 7/10/19 5:33 am, blocher@columbus.rr.com wrote: > > Over 10 years ago I started a website ( www.fourier-series.com)in which I built interactive flash programs...[snip] > At the end of this year most browsers will be disabling flash and I > will be sun setting my website.> Life moves on. > > Publish the source code, with a copyright requesting acknowledgment for > derived works. If your code is readable, someone will pick it up and > make modern versions (using SVG, etc). Who knows, I might even do some > myself. My impedance nomograph seems to have been widely appreciated > here, even though no-one *ever* has pressed the Donate button :) > > <http://polyplex.org/electronics/nomograph/> > > Clifford Heath.
If you permitted others to copy it with suitable attribution it could get spread widely. NT
On Sunday, October 6, 2019 at 2:34:00 PM UTC-4, blo...@columbus.rr.com wrote:
> Over 10 years ago I started a website ( www.fourier-series.com)in which I built interactive flash programs to teach various engineering concepts. I Initially designed these programs to personally understand DSP and then to pass along what I learned to others****. These topics were fourier series, discrete fourier series, fourier transforms filtering I/Q modulation and also some RF stuff most notably the smith chart. > > I produced content aggressively for about three years (2008-2011). At the websites height I received about 2 emails per week and had about 3G of downloads per day. My site also produced great returns for web searches (typically #1,2 or 3) on the topics I covered. Many professors linked to my pages. In about 2012 I got burned out on this but kept the content up. The site peaked in about 2013 or 2014 and then has had a slow decline in popularity and hits. I still get traffic , but it is way down. I get an occasional letter but it is very occasional. > > At the end of this year most browsers will be disabling flash and I will be sun setting my website. > > Was it worth it? I received No money for it ever. I learned a ton about the topics for myself and I got over one hundred letters thanking me for helping them understand various topics. > > Life moves on.
Maybe I am showing my ignorance about Flash. The one thing I do know is that I've always hated it. Why can't you do this in HTML5? Whatever tool you used for the Flash does that also support HTML5? If so, there is likely a mode to convert your code. Even if there isn't, it is likely there is a conversion program out there somewhere. -- Rick C. - Get 2,000 miles of free Supercharging - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
On 2019/10/06 7:08 p.m., Clifford Heath wrote:
> On 7/10/19 5:33 am, blocher@columbus.rr.com wrote: >> Over 10 years ago I started a website ( www.fourier-series.com)in >> which I built interactive flash programs...[snip] > At the end of this >> year most browsers will be disabling flash and I > will be sun setting my website.> Life moves on. > > Publish the source code, with a copyright requesting acknowledgment for > derived works. If your code is readable, someone will pick it up and > make modern versions (using SVG, etc). Who knows, I might even do some > myself. My impedance nomograph seems to have been widely appreciated > here, even though no-one *ever* has pressed the Donate button :) > > <http://polyplex.org/electronics/nomograph/> > > Clifford Heath.
For donations the only thing I found that worked at all was asking for a wee bit of peanut brittle if the content helped. I did get a few bags mailed from the US and Canada! John :-#)# -- (Please post followups or tech inquiries to the USENET newsgroup) John's Jukes Ltd. MOVED to #7 - 3979 Marine Way, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5J 5E3 (604)872-5757 (Pinballs, Jukes, Video Games) www.flippers.com "Old pinballers never die, they just flip out."
On 10/10/19 3:01 am, tabbypurr@gmail.com wrote:
> On Monday, 7 October 2019 03:08:13 UTC+1, Clifford Heath wrote: >> On 7/10/19 5:33 am, blocher@columbus.rr.com wrote: >>> Over 10 years ago I started a website ( www.fourier-series.com)in which I built interactive flash programs...[snip] > At the end of this year most browsers will be disabling flash and I >> will be sun setting my website.> Life moves on. >> >> Publish the source code, with a copyright requesting acknowledgment for >> derived works. If your code is readable, someone will pick it up and >> make modern versions (using SVG, etc). Who knows, I might even do some >> myself. My impedance nomograph seems to have been widely appreciated >> here, even though no-one *ever* has pressed the Donate button :) >> >> <http://polyplex.org/electronics/nomograph/> >> >> Clifford Heath. > > If you permitted others to copy it with suitable attribution it could get spread widely.
If you're referring to my nomograph, they already do that. It's all in one page that you can save and run from your local storage. Why would someone want to host it again elsewhere? It's a shame that the OP has not responded either to my post here or to private email. I hate to see useful tools get lost like this. Clifford Heath.
On Wednesday, October 9, 2019 at 8:17:04 PM UTC-4, Clifford Heath wrote:
> On 10/10/19 3:01 am, tabbypurr@gmail.com wrote: > > On Monday, 7 October 2019 03:08:13 UTC+1, Clifford Heath wrote: > >> On 7/10/19 5:33 am, blocher@columbus.rr.com wrote: > >>> Over 10 years ago I started a website ( www.fourier-series.com)in which I built interactive flash programs...[snip] > At the end of this year most browsers will be disabling flash and I > >> will be sun setting my website.> Life moves on. > >> > >> Publish the source code, with a copyright requesting acknowledgment for > >> derived works. If your code is readable, someone will pick it up and > >> make modern versions (using SVG, etc). Who knows, I might even do some > >> myself. My impedance nomograph seems to have been widely appreciated > >> here, even though no-one *ever* has pressed the Donate button :) > >> > >> <http://polyplex.org/electronics/nomograph/> > >> > >> Clifford Heath. > > > > If you permitted others to copy it with suitable attribution it could get spread widely. > > If you're referring to my nomograph, they already do that. It's all in > one page that you can save and run from your local storage. Why would > someone want to host it again elsewhere? > > It's a shame that the OP has not responded either to my post here or to > private email. I hate to see useful tools get lost like this. > > Clifford Heath.
I have been hesitating to respond because I am not sure what I want to do. I am not really adverse to making the code public. Someone may be able to use it. The way flash works is that you have a graphical environment with picture objects and then the actionscipt code is written around the object. All the math is in the code, but it may be difficult to understand the code without the graphical canvas that is part of the "source code". I suppose you could figure it out if you were running the flash program and looking at the action script code.
On Wednesday, October 9, 2019 at 1:54:34 PM UTC-4, Rick C wrote:
> On Sunday, October 6, 2019 at 2:34:00 PM UTC-4, blo...@columbus.rr.com wrote: > > Over 10 years ago I started a website ( www.fourier-series.com)in which I built interactive flash programs to teach various engineering concepts. I Initially designed these programs to personally understand DSP and then to pass along what I learned to others****. These topics were fourier series, discrete fourier series, fourier transforms filtering I/Q modulation and also some RF stuff most notably the smith chart. > > > > I produced content aggressively for about three years (2008-2011). At the websites height I received about 2 emails per week and had about 3G of downloads per day. My site also produced great returns for web searches (typically #1,2 or 3) on the topics I covered. Many professors linked to my pages. In about 2012 I got burned out on this but kept the content up. The site peaked in about 2013 or 2014 and then has had a slow decline in popularity and hits. I still get traffic , but it is way down. I get an occasional letter but it is very occasional. > > > > At the end of this year most browsers will be disabling flash and I will be sun setting my website. > > > > Was it worth it? I received No money for it ever. I learned a ton about the topics for myself and I got over one hundred letters thanking me for helping them understand various topics. > > > > Life moves on. > > Maybe I am showing my ignorance about Flash. The one thing I do know is that I've always hated it. > > Why can't you do this in HTML5? Whatever tool you used for the Flash does that also support HTML5? If so, there is likely a mode to convert your code. Even if there isn't, it is likely there is a conversion program out there somewhere. > > -- > > Rick C. > > - Get 2,000 miles of free Supercharging > - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
I have not looked into converting this to HTML. I am not sure I have the interest to pursue it at this time. My understanding (through minimal reading on this) is that the conversion tools work best on annimations and flash content that is not very interactive. The more interactive the content is (My site is very interactive) then the harder it is to convert. Also, from what I have read, the actionscript code need to be manually converted to javascript. Flash wsa a wonderful tool for building interactive content. Unfortunately there were security holes built into the foundations of the program that could not be overcome.