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Tektronix

Started by bitrex September 23, 2019
DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
------------------------------------
> Phil Allison > > > Finally, as of last month, using optical plus co-ax cable link > > with Australia's new NBN. > > > > NBN = "National Broadband Network" - means I now enjoy 12MbS down > > link and 1MbS up, about 20 time faster compared to previously for > > the same or maybe less cost. > > > > That asshole that screwed your entire continent, last I heard is > why it took so long. He was some lame phone guy here in the US, and > then went over there and now you guys are ALL forced to use a single > provider from what I remember. >
** " NBN Co " is a government owned corporation, we a have a few of them here. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NBN_Co The national (essentially fibre) network is now nearing full coverage and replaces all previous copper wire phone and internet access. Soon after an area has NBN access, the twisted pair system and related exchanges are shut down for ever. Consumers can opt to go with any number of retail suppliers for phone/internet contracts, so there is competition on pricing - but NBN Co control the lot. No biggie for us, another company called "Telstra" had a *full monopoly* on telecommunication not so long ago. ..... Phil
On Wed, 25 Sep 2019 16:44:38 -0700 (PDT), Phil Allison
<pallison49@gmail.com> wrote:

>DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote: >------------------------------------ >> Phil Allison >> >> > Finally, as of last month, using optical plus co-ax cable link >> > with Australia's new NBN. >> > >> > NBN = "National Broadband Network" - means I now enjoy 12MbS down >> > link and 1MbS up, about 20 time faster compared to previously for >> > the same or maybe less cost. >> > >> >> That asshole that screwed your entire continent, last I heard is >> why it took so long. He was some lame phone guy here in the US, and >> then went over there and now you guys are ALL forced to use a single >> provider from what I remember. >> > >** " NBN Co " is a government owned corporation, we a have a few of them here. > >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NBN_Co > >The national (essentially fibre) network is now nearing full coverage and replaces all previous copper wire phone and internet access. > >Soon after an area has NBN access, the twisted pair system and related exchanges are shut down for ever.
What about the last mile? Copper, cable TV, FTTH, microwave, whatever? We seem to have a mix of everything here.
On 26/9/19 10:01 am, John Larkin wrote:
> On Wed, 25 Sep 2019 16:44:38 -0700 (PDT), Phil Allison > <pallison49@gmail.com> wrote: > >> DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote: >> ------------------------------------ >>> Phil Allison >>> >>>> Finally, as of last month, using optical plus co-ax cable link >>>> with Australia's new NBN. >>>> >>>> NBN = "National Broadband Network" - means I now enjoy 12MbS down >>>> link and 1MbS up, about 20 time faster compared to previously for >>>> the same or maybe less cost. >>>> >>> >>> That asshole that screwed your entire continent, last I heard is >>> why it took so long. He was some lame phone guy here in the US, and >>> then went over there and now you guys are ALL forced to use a single >>> provider from what I remember. >>> >> >> ** " NBN Co " is a government owned corporation, we a have a few of them here. >> >> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NBN_Co >> >> The national (essentially fibre) network is now nearing full coverage and replaces all previous copper wire phone and internet access. >> >> Soon after an area has NBN access, the twisted pair system and related exchanges are shut down for ever. > > What about the last mile? Copper, cable TV, FTTH, microwave, whatever? > > We seem to have a mix of everything here.
We have a mix here too, and that's what the complaining is about. The old copper loops are all being phased out, but where there is a sufficiently reliable/recent cable TV network (my personal situation) they're re-purposing that. Only some areas are getting new fibre, and often that's just to their street or curb, not to their property. We had two national cable TV networks, and NBN Co paid one of them to go away, deciding to use the other one. There are three backhaul networks, and all three serve exactly the same 121 POIs, that was the price of entry. NBNCo is not one of them, but they standardise the service offerings so the networks (and the retail companies) can compete fairly on cost and service. <https://www.nbnco.com.au/blog/the-nbn-project/what-is-a-poi-how-and-where-your-provider-connects-to-the-nbn-network>. All up: massive needless obfuscation of what could have been fast and simple. Standard practise for crooks looking to enrich themselves are the public's expense. Some people are just avoiding it and using fixed wireless instead. Clifford Heath.
On Thu, 26 Sep 2019 11:07:38 +1000, Clifford Heath
<no.spam@please.net> wrote:

>On 26/9/19 10:01 am, John Larkin wrote: >> On Wed, 25 Sep 2019 16:44:38 -0700 (PDT), Phil Allison >> <pallison49@gmail.com> wrote: >> >>> DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote: >>> ------------------------------------ >>>> Phil Allison >>>> >>>>> Finally, as of last month, using optical plus co-ax cable link >>>>> with Australia's new NBN. >>>>> >>>>> NBN = "National Broadband Network" - means I now enjoy 12MbS down >>>>> link and 1MbS up, about 20 time faster compared to previously for >>>>> the same or maybe less cost. >>>>> >>>> >>>> That asshole that screwed your entire continent, last I heard is >>>> why it took so long. He was some lame phone guy here in the US, and >>>> then went over there and now you guys are ALL forced to use a single >>>> provider from what I remember. >>>> >>> >>> ** " NBN Co " is a government owned corporation, we a have a few of them here. >>> >>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NBN_Co >>> >>> The national (essentially fibre) network is now nearing full coverage and replaces all previous copper wire phone and internet access. >>> >>> Soon after an area has NBN access, the twisted pair system and related exchanges are shut down for ever. >> >> What about the last mile? Copper, cable TV, FTTH, microwave, whatever? >> >> We seem to have a mix of everything here. > >We have a mix here too, and that's what the complaining is about. The >old copper loops are all being phased out, but where there is a >sufficiently reliable/recent cable TV network (my personal situation) >they're re-purposing that. Only some areas are getting new fibre, and >often that's just to their street or curb, not to their property.
Here at home we get our internet over cable TV. (Used to have AT&T copper... it was awful.) The Brat has fiber all the way into her condo. My nextdoor neighbor has a short-haul microwave dish; so do we at work. I once tried a cellular modem for internet, but that never worked. I'm thinking that 5G might become universal for everything. No wires or anything to the end users. Looking out from the roof at work, I can see about 25 dishes, with my poor eyesight. I bet I could spot hundreds with binoculars. It would be cool if we could see the microwave beams at night. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc lunatic fringe electronics
jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in 
news:ujavoel5onckcjnreonqg1and2nb4fe8bn@4ax.com:

> I'm thinking that 5G might become universal for everything. No
wires
> or anything to the end users.
Even in the 4G realm, there is a ministry for the homeless where one of the employees let his phone be a wifi connection point for ten users at a time, and I had no problem getting 1.2MB/s movie file feeds from him while the bar (ten users) was full. It depended more on how close I was to him (his phone), because his rate was solid all the time. He had unlimited data, obviously. I am unaware if his provider ever contacted him about the huge usage, because he did it for about a year. Sure would muck up both the airspace and our privacy, but it is likely where things are headed. You should simply tie your PC to your phone. Phone = generally secure. Plebty of bandwidth.. no brainer. No more need for the hugely overpriced cable twerps (both for internet and TV content). Because you TV also can stream content for you now. Best path for me. One price for phone. Use it for the PC needs and even my TV content streaming needs. No more cable, or additional Internet provider, putting all that on a back burner, since all your connectivity needs can now be handled by the phone. They jumped in and beat them all. Fuck (overpriced since the eighties) cable.
On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 14:02:17 +0000 (UTC),
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:

>jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in >news:ujavoel5onckcjnreonqg1and2nb4fe8bn@4ax.com: > >> I'm thinking that 5G might become universal for everything. No >wires >> or anything to the end users. > > Even in the 4G realm, there is a ministry for the homeless where >one of the employees let his phone be a wifi connection point for ten >users at a time, and I had no problem getting 1.2MB/s movie file >feeds from him while the bar (ten users) was full. It depended more >on how close I was to him (his phone), because his rate was solid all >the time. He had unlimited data, obviously. I am unaware if his >provider ever contacted him about the huge usage, because he did it >for about a year. > > Sure would muck up both the airspace and our privacy, but it is >likely where things are headed. > > You should simply tie your PC to your phone. Phone = generally >secure. Plebty of bandwidth.. no brainer. No more need for the >hugely overpriced cable twerps (both for internet and TV content). >Because you TV also can stream content for you now.
I have a flip phone. It's just a telephone. The cable modem is giving me 673/41 mbits this morning, more than anyone needs. I do like fast upload speeds because I use Dropbox and email big files now and then.
> > Best path for me. One price for phone. Use it for the PC needs >and even my TV content streaming needs. No more cable, or additional >Internet provider, putting all that on a back burner, since all your >connectivity needs can now be handled by the phone. They jumped in >and beat them all. > > Fuck (overpriced since the eighties) cable.
Comcast just upgraded our tv/net/phone service and reduced the price. Competition, I guess. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc lunatic fringe electronics
jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in 
news:l5i1pe1sai5a3vrl1iinaed708375nbapo@4ax.com:

> Comcast just upgraded our tv/net/phone service and reduced the price. > Competition, I guess. > >
All three of those is like what $150 a month? I doubt any 5G phone will be that high.
On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 15:35:08 +0000 (UTC),
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:

>jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in >news:l5i1pe1sai5a3vrl1iinaed708375nbapo@4ax.com: > >> Comcast just upgraded our tv/net/phone service and reduced the price. >> Competition, I guess. >> >> > > All three of those is like what $150 a month? > > I doubt any 5G phone will be that high.
It was about $100 before the recent price cut and speed upgrade. I'm not sure what it is now. Mo likes the TV part. I have no use for it. Seems like, with 600 mbits coming in, there's no use for cable TV. Watch anything any time you feel like it, if you do feel like it. I think cable in its present form is doomed. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc lunatic fringe electronics
On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 10:28:42 -0700, jlarkin wrote:

> Seems like, with 600 mbits coming in, there's no use for cable TV. Watch > anything any time you feel like it, if you do feel like it. I think > cable in its present form is doomed.
It's funny how times change. I remember when getting cable was among the highest aspirations of the lower classes; those who achieved that lofty goal were instantly raised to celebrity status among their fellow ghetto- dwellers. Yet now, as you no doubt correctly foresee, the sun is firmly setting on cable and there are new and better technologies comin' down the pike for the poor and huddled masses to lust after. :-D -- This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.
Cursitor Doom <curd@notformail.com> wrote in
news:qmqvrd$iu0$8@dont-email.me: 

> ; those who achieved that lofty > goal were instantly raised to celebrity status among their fellow > ghetto- dwellers.
Hey! I liked being able to watch "Gator" on (cable)TV while shooting pool in my dad's rec room back in 1978. Me and my friends could get a buzz and come in and watch cable while we played pool. Way better than getting a buzz and twiddling our thumbs. On Warner Amex's "CUBE" cable system installed in Greater Cincinnati. A dual coax bidirectional system that was never used to its full potential in any of the cities it was installed in AFAIK. It could take votes and a few other things they never used. All they used it for and cared about was pay per view authorizations. I think they also lost interest when TIME bought them. And then fiber began to usher in not long thereafter. That dual coax crap sure was hard to pull a 150' drop up on though. Damn! Especially in HUG-A-POLE mode. :-) Good thing I only had a couple of those. Did Jim Brown's house in Indian Hill too. It was a couple hundred feet through the woods from the pole to the P-hook (on a one story house!), I think because they were unable to make a run down his street (Indian Hill is one of the 1%er neighborhoods in Cinti). Then my next lofty goal then was owning LaserDisc instead of renting videos, the boat of which I never boarded. WAY better A/V quality. Paid $125 for my 2001 ASO. Had a bunch of now rare NASA discs too.