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Pico-PSU @ 200-250W?

Started by geos October 8, 2018
Hahahah no, not if you want dirty automotive power roasting your board. 
It's probably noisy as sin, too.

It might be okay for what it is, but a real automotive version (say like 
what would power an OEM's dash computer -- given that they aren't using ITX 
mobos but something custom anyway) would wrap that thing in a metal box 
(with thermal pads), maybe add output current limiting, add a 12V buck-boost 
(notice the 12V rail is straight through), extra filtering, and transient 
and load dump protection.

ISTR there are small mobos with a plain 12V input (or 18V or whatever), with 
the converters onboard (which would be what the OEM does).  Then you would 
only need to add protection circuitry.

Tim

-- 
Seven Transistor Labs, LLC
Electrical Engineering Consultation and Design
Website: https://www.seventransistorlabs.com/

"geos" <geos@SPAMPRECZ.autograf.pl> wrote in message 
news:5bbb8529$0$501$65785112@news.neostrada.pl...
> I'm looking for 200-250W ATX Pico-PSU power supply. I see on Chinese sites > that they sell such things rated at this wattage for 20-30$, for example: > > https://www.aliexpress.com/item/DC-12V-250W-Pico-ATX-switch-PSU-24pin-MINI-ITX-ATX-High-Power-Supply/32629921198.html?spm=a2g0s.8937460.0.0.4eb72e0ev6xyVU > > My questions is: when looking at the components used, general design > etc. -- do you, experienced in electronics, have a feeling that such power > supply can handle 200-250W with no issues? Does such product look > reliable/reasonable to you? Or better I should not trust this bold > marketing presented there and look for something else? > > I would appreciate your opinion. > > thank you, > geos
On 10/08/2018 04:19 PM, Tim Williams wrote:
> Hahahah no, not if you want dirty automotive power roasting your board. > It's probably noisy as sin, too. > > It might be okay for what it is, but a real automotive version (say like > what would power an OEM's dash computer -- given that they aren't using > ITX mobos but something custom anyway) would wrap that thing in a metal > box (with thermal pads), maybe add output current limiting, add a 12V > buck-boost (notice the 12V rail is straight through), extra filtering, > and transient and load dump protection. > > ISTR there are small mobos with a plain 12V input (or 18V or whatever), > with the converters onboard (which would be what the OEM does).&#2013266080; Then > you would only need to add protection circuitry. > > Tim >
I didn't notice the 12V rail is straight thru on that model, for an automotive use PSU that's mad. At least these give current ratings for the various rails. And don't list automotive in the suggested applications: <http://www.itxpower.net/en/itx120wl.htm