Forums

IR Repeaters?

Started by Jim Thompson May 16, 2018
Do any of these IR repeaters that use RF or Ethernet to control a
source in another room actually work well?

Suggestions/recommendations?
		
                                        ...Jim Thompson
-- 
| James E.Thompson                                 |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations                               |     et      |
| Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems  |    manus    |
| STV, Queen Creek, AZ 85142    Skype: skypeanalog |             |
| Voice:(480)460-2350  Fax: Available upon request |  Brass Rat  |
| E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com |    1962     |

     Thinking outside the box... producing elegant solutions,
              by understanding what nature is hiding.

"It is not in doing what you like, but in liking what you do that
is the secret of happiness."  -James Barrie
On Wednesday, May 16, 2018 at 6:29:06 PM UTC-7, Jim Thompson wrote:
> Do any of these IR repeaters that use RF or Ethernet to control a > source in another room actually work well?
I've played with this remote control <https://www.amazon.com/X-10-ur73a-Non-Learning-Remote-Control/dp/B0007N7HEM/ref=sr_1_48?ie=UTF8&qid=1526523566&sr=8-48&keywords=X10+remote+control> and a generic RF/IR receiver (which blinks an IR LED). Because it's a universal remote, anything that works on IR is repeated at RF and can be used through walls. The downside is, you don't get any visual feedback to know if you mistype a TV channel, for instance. And as for my stereo, the 'generic' buttons don't begin to cover all the features. There's also IR receive/RF repeat and RF receive/IR repeat pairs of modules available, but that's too much like networking, and smartphone IOT apps are the better solution if you need that much infrastructure.
In article <4kmpfdposngotcg4esb97eha4fjtat1t3t@4ax.com>,
Jim Thompson  <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote:
>Do any of these IR repeaters that use RF or Ethernet to control a >source in another room actually work well? > >Suggestions/recommendations?
Avoid the X-10 "black pyramid" units. They're an IR-to-RF-to-IR repeater. The RF receivers are apparently as broad as a barn, extremely non-selective, and thus prone to pick up almost any RF noise in a fairly wide range and turn it into IR pulses. It's often possible to see the red "receiving" LED flicker, even when there's no IR remote being used anywhere near the transmitting end. The bogus IR pulses will then tend to interfere with (and often block) IR remote control operations in the room where the receiver unit is located. They're an exercise in frustration. One could probably do a lot better with a pair of Raspberry Pi Zero boards and a bit of auxiliary circuitry (an IR-receiver module tied to a GPIO at the receiving side, and an IR LED tied to a GPIO with PWM capability at the transmitting side), and a wired Ethernet connection.
On 2018-05-17, Dave Platt <dplatt@coop.radagast.org> wrote:
> In article <4kmpfdposngotcg4esb97eha4fjtat1t3t@4ax.com>, > Jim Thompson <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >>Do any of these IR repeaters that use RF or Ethernet to control a >>source in another room actually work well? >> >>Suggestions/recommendations? > > Avoid the X-10 "black pyramid" units. > > They're an IR-to-RF-to-IR repeater. The RF receivers are apparently > as broad as a barn, extremely non-selective, and thus prone to pick up > almost any RF noise in a fairly wide range and turn it into IR > pulses. It's often possible to see the red "receiving" LED flicker, > even when there's no IR remote being used anywhere near the > transmitting end. > > The bogus IR pulses will then tend to interfere with (and often block) > IR remote control operations in the room where the receiver unit is > located. > > They're an exercise in frustration. > > One could probably do a lot better with a pair of Raspberry Pi Zero > boards and a bit of auxiliary circuitry (an IR-receiver module tied to > a GPIO at the receiving side, and an IR LED tied to a GPIO with PWM > capability at the transmitting side), and a wired Ethernet connection.
yeah, I'm fairly sure LIRC runs on Pi seems like the electronics each end would be about $20 retail, less if you can power the pi off an existing usb port. Pi Zero-w has wifi. But if youre going wired, and you can spare a three conductors between the source and destination, just a put an IR receiver on end and a 555 blinking a led on the other end of the wire, -- &Oslash;&ordf;
Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote in news:pdlrk9$t37$2
@gonzo.alcatraz:

> On 2018-05-17, Dave Platt <dplatt@coop.radagast.org> wrote: >> In article <4kmpfdposngotcg4esb97eha4fjtat1t3t@4ax.com>, >> Jim Thompson <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com>
wrote:
>>>Do any of these IR repeaters that use RF or Ethernet to control a >>>source in another room actually work well? >>> >>>Suggestions/recommendations? >> >> Avoid the X-10 "black pyramid" units. >> >> They're an IR-to-RF-to-IR repeater. The RF receivers are apparently >> as broad as a barn, extremely non-selective, and thus prone to pick
up
>> almost any RF noise in a fairly wide range and turn it into IR >> pulses. It's often possible to see the red "receiving" LED flicker, >> even when there's no IR remote being used anywhere near the >> transmitting end. >> >> The bogus IR pulses will then tend to interfere with (and often
block)
>> IR remote control operations in the room where the receiver unit is >> located. >> >> They're an exercise in frustration. >> >> One could probably do a lot better with a pair of Raspberry Pi Zero >> boards and a bit of auxiliary circuitry (an IR-receiver module tied
to
>> a GPIO at the receiving side, and an IR LED tied to a GPIO with PWM >> capability at the transmitting side), and a wired Ethernet
connection.
> > yeah, I'm fairly sure LIRC runs on Pi > > seems like the electronics each end would be about $20 retail, less if > you can power the pi off an existing usb port. Pi Zero-w has wifi. > > But if youre going wired, and you can spare a three conductors between > the source and destination, just a put an IR receiver on end and a 555 > blinking a led on the other end of the wire, >
An IR "repeater" is a stupid idea. One presses the button on one's remote, and the TV comes on, then the repeater "repeats" and the TV turns back off again. DUMB IDEA. Now, making a custom remote output queues to the "IR Dispatcher" would work. The "dispatcher" puts out the right sequence for what you want, but the remote does not itself generate them.
On Fri, 18 May 2018 12:42:14 +0000 (UTC),
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:

>Jasen Betts <jasen@xnet.co.nz> wrote in news:pdlrk9$t37$2 >@gonzo.alcatraz: > >> On 2018-05-17, Dave Platt <dplatt@coop.radagast.org> wrote: >>> In article <4kmpfdposngotcg4esb97eha4fjtat1t3t@4ax.com>, >>> Jim Thompson <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> >wrote: >>>>Do any of these IR repeaters that use RF or Ethernet to control a >>>>source in another room actually work well? >>>> >>>>Suggestions/recommendations? >>> >>> Avoid the X-10 "black pyramid" units. >>> >>> They're an IR-to-RF-to-IR repeater. The RF receivers are apparently >>> as broad as a barn, extremely non-selective, and thus prone to pick >up >>> almost any RF noise in a fairly wide range and turn it into IR >>> pulses. It's often possible to see the red "receiving" LED flicker, >>> even when there's no IR remote being used anywhere near the >>> transmitting end. >>> >>> The bogus IR pulses will then tend to interfere with (and often >block) >>> IR remote control operations in the room where the receiver unit is >>> located. >>> >>> They're an exercise in frustration. >>> >>> One could probably do a lot better with a pair of Raspberry Pi Zero >>> boards and a bit of auxiliary circuitry (an IR-receiver module tied >to >>> a GPIO at the receiving side, and an IR LED tied to a GPIO with PWM >>> capability at the transmitting side), and a wired Ethernet >connection. >> >> yeah, I'm fairly sure LIRC runs on Pi >> >> seems like the electronics each end would be about $20 retail, less if >> you can power the pi off an existing usb port. Pi Zero-w has wifi. >> >> But if youre going wired, and you can spare a three conductors between >> the source and destination, just a put an IR receiver on end and a 555 >> blinking a led on the other end of the wire, >> > > An IR "repeater" is a stupid idea. One presses the button on one's >remote, and the TV comes on, then the repeater "repeats" and the TV >turns back off again. > > DUMB IDEA. > > Now, making a custom remote output queues to the "IR Dispatcher" would >work. The "dispatcher" puts out the right sequence for what you want, >but the remote does not itself generate them.
Ignorant. Remote control is in one room, device controlled is in ANOTHER ROOM... Sheeesh! Please pay attention between snorts :-( ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson | mens | | Analog Innovations | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | STV, Queen Creek, AZ 85142 Skype: skypeanalog | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | Thinking outside the box... producing elegant solutions, by understanding what nature is hiding. "It is not in doing what you like, but in liking what you do that is the secret of happiness." -James Barrie
Jim Thompson <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote in 
news:7vbufdd3nkb8llthmkpfqlt3bnkoa2q5nb@4ax.com:

> Ignorant. Remote control is in one room, device controlled is in > ANOTHER ROOM... Sheeesh! Please pay attention between snorts :-( > >
Ignorant? Fuck you. You would not be here if your mother had not ignored the flush handle. Snort that, POS. Stopping at "sheesh" would have been fine, but you had to make a retarded crack.