Forums

Cooling of overloaded transformer

Started by Klaus Kragelund April 1, 2018
On Sun, 1 Apr 2018 17:20:57 -0000 (UTC), Cursitor Doom
<curd@notformail.com> wrote:

>On Sun, 01 Apr 2018 09:53:18 -0700, tabbypurr wrote: > >> On Sunday, 1 April 2018 17:49:38 UTC+1, John Larkin wrote: > >>> I do most house wiring live, because getting bit by 120V isn't a big >>> deal. 240 makes a lot of sense - less current, more power - but I bet >>> it hurts a lot more. >> >> After 1 bite people are usually scared senseless. > >Not me. I can barely sense it. One of the benefits of having very dry >skin. One of the dis-benefits of same, however, is getting constantly >zapped by static in the winter months.
I don't like a 120V bite at all (probably really bad for me, too) and have very dry skin in the Winter, too. I'll shut the power off before working on electricity, thanks. It's not very hard to walk over to the wall and flip the switch. ;-) I've also gotten bit when I separated a neutral and there was something else on the line back-feeding power in the neutral.
On Sunday, April 1, 2018 at 10:38:11 PM UTC+2, Steve Wilson wrote:
> Klaus Kragelund <klauskvik@hotmail.com> wrote: > > > Hi > > > When I go to the states, I usually buy white goods, half price than in > > Europe > > > So I have a 600W 230V to 115V transformer installed in a cabinet > > > Now I have bought a 1300W toaster > > > Instead of buying a new transformer, I am seriously considering just > > overloading it, but then keeping the heat down by forced convection, > > namely a fan > > > Anyone tried overloading transformers before? > > > Regards > > > Klaus > > Check Amazon US. You can get 220V appliances real cheap. Have them ship to > your hotel. Here's some toasters: > > https://tinyurl.com/ya79ml7n
Hah, Kitchen Aid folks aren't stupid The 220V versions are the same prices as in Denmark https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=220v+toaster+kitchen+aid&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3A220v+toaster+kitchen+aid 110V is less than half price Cheers Klaus
On Sunday, April 1, 2018 at 9:07:26 PM UTC+2, Joseph Gwinn wrote:
> On Apr 1, 2018, Klaus Kragelund wrote > (in article<6c166a81-64a7-4ed6-af8b-f79545106401@googlegroups.com>): > > > Hi > > > > When I go to the states, I usually buy white goods, half price than in Europe > > > > So I have a 600W 230V to 115V transformer installed in a cabinet > > > > Now I have bought a 1300W toaster > > > > Instead of buying a new transformer, I am seriously considering just > > overloading it, but then keeping the heat down by forced convection, namely a > > fan > > > > Anyone tried overloading transformers before? > > Won&rsquo;t really work, as others have said. My wife burn&rsquo;t her favorite hair > dryer out by forgetting to turn the swith from 115 to 230 on a trip some > years ago. Solution was to buy a local (European) hair dryer. > > I wouldn&rsquo;t think that toasters are so expensive (even in Europe) as to be > worth buying a big transformer. >
Kitchen Aid products are half price. Over the last 2 years I have saved more than 1000 USD, compare that to the cost of a transformer of 70 USD? Cheers Klaus
On Sunday, April 1, 2018 at 9:07:26 PM UTC+2, Joseph Gwinn wrote:
> On Apr 1, 2018, Klaus Kragelund wrote > (in article<6c166a81-64a7-4ed6-af8b-f79545106401@googlegroups.com>): > > > Hi > > > > When I go to the states, I usually buy white goods, half price than in Europe > > > > So I have a 600W 230V to 115V transformer installed in a cabinet > > > > Now I have bought a 1300W toaster > > > > Instead of buying a new transformer, I am seriously considering just > > overloading it, but then keeping the heat down by forced convection, namely a > > fan > > > > Anyone tried overloading transformers before? > > Won&rsquo;t really work, as others have said. My wife burn&rsquo;t her favorite hair > dryer out by forgetting to turn the swith from 115 to 230 on a trip some > years ago. Solution was to buy a local (European) hair dryer. > > I wouldn&rsquo;t think that toasters are so expensive (even in Europe) as to be > worth buying a big transformer. >
By the way, it's only certain brands Kitchen Aid Festool tools Whereas for example Garmin products are sometimes more expensive in the US even though the exchange rate US-DK has fallen by 15% the last year Cheers Klaus
Klaus Kragelund <klauskvik@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Kitchen Aid products are half price. Over the last 2 years I have saved > more than 1000 USD, compare that to the cost of a transformer of 70 USD?
> Cheers
> Klaus
So then buy a transformer. What's your problem? After saving that much, there shouldn't be that many Kitchen Aid products left. A toaster is a pretty small investment. Why spend $70 for a transformer to power a $19 toaster?
On Sunday, April 1, 2018 at 12:15:56 PM UTC-7, Lasse Langwadt Christensen wrote:

> modify the toaster to run on 230 with a diode in series with the > heating element ?
A 1kW toaster on 120V has circa 14 ohms resustabce when hot. On 230V, with 50% duty cycle, that will dissipate circa 1900 watts. The solution lies elsewhere...
On Apr 1, 2018, Klaus Kragelund wrote
(in article<1dd94705-9628-42c6-a6b5-bb7b3f36be1b@googlegroups.com>):

> On Sunday, April 1, 2018 at 9:07:26 PM UTC+2, Joseph Gwinn wrote: > > On Apr 1, 2018, Klaus Kragelund wrote > > (in article<6c166a81-64a7-4ed6-af8b-f79545106401@googlegroups.com>): > > > > > Hi > > > > > > When I go to the states, I usually buy white goods, half price than in > > > Europe > > > > > > So I have a 600W 230V to 115V transformer installed in a cabinet > > > > > > Now I have bought a 1300W toaster > > > > > > Instead of buying a new transformer, I am seriously considering just > > > overloading it, but then keeping the heat down by forced convection, > > > namely a fan > > > > > > Anyone tried overloading transformers before? > > > > Won&rsquo;t really work, as others have said. My wife burnt her favorite hair > > dryer out by forgetting to turn the swith from 115 to 230 on a trip some > > years ago. Solution was to buy a local (European) hair dryer. > > > > I wouldn&rsquo;t think that toasters are so expensive (even in Europe) as to be > > worth buying a big transformer. > > Kitchen Aid products are half price. Over the last 2 years I have saved more > than 1000 USD, compare that to the cost of a transformer of 70 USD?
A 1500 watt 240:120 transformer for 70 USD? I&rsquo;ve seen lots of &ldquo;Converters&rdquo; for small dollars, but they are unlikely to be real transformers (that is, made of iron and copper). One way to tell is to look at the shipping weight. I&rsquo;d believe $140, though: .<http://www.rockler.com/step-up-step-down-voltage-transformer-110-120-to-220- 240v?sid=V9146> Rockler is a well-respected seller of woodworking equipment and supplies in the US, and I&rsquo;ve bough many things from them. Joe
On Sun, 01 Apr 2018 22:29:25 GMT, Steve Wilson <no@spam.com> wrote:

>Klaus Kragelund <klauskvik@hotmail.com> wrote: > >> Kitchen Aid products are half price. Over the last 2 years I have saved >> more than 1000 USD, compare that to the cost of a transformer of 70 USD? > >> Cheers > >> Klaus > >So then buy a transformer. What's your problem? > >After saving that much, there shouldn't be that many Kitchen Aid products >left. A toaster is a pretty small investment. Why spend $70 for a transformer >to power a $19 toaster?
A toaster worth the loaf of bread costs a lot more than $19.
On Sun, 1 Apr 2018 15:15:45 -0700 (PDT), Klaus Kragelund
<klauskvik@hotmail.com> wrote:

>On Sunday, April 1, 2018 at 9:07:26 PM UTC+2, Joseph Gwinn wrote: >> On Apr 1, 2018, Klaus Kragelund wrote >> (in article<6c166a81-64a7-4ed6-af8b-f79545106401@googlegroups.com>): >> >> > Hi >> > >> > When I go to the states, I usually buy white goods, half price than in Europe >> > >> > So I have a 600W 230V to 115V transformer installed in a cabinet >> > >> > Now I have bought a 1300W toaster >> > >> > Instead of buying a new transformer, I am seriously considering just >> > overloading it, but then keeping the heat down by forced convection, namely a >> > fan >> > >> > Anyone tried overloading transformers before? >> >> Won&#2013266066;t really work, as others have said. My wife burn&#2013266066;t her favorite hair >> dryer out by forgetting to turn the swith from 115 to 230 on a trip some >> years ago. Solution was to buy a local (European) hair dryer. >> >> I wouldn&#2013266066;t think that toasters are so expensive (even in Europe) as to be >> worth buying a big transformer. >> >By the way, it's only certain brands > >Kitchen Aid
Have a kitchen full of KitchenAid appliances.
>Festool tools
...and a basement full of those. ;-) Are they even more expensive than they are here?
> >Whereas for example Garmin products are sometimes more expensive in the US even though the exchange rate US-DK has fallen by 15% the last year
None of those.
On Sunday, 1 April 2018 19:35:31 UTC+1, jrwal...@gmail.com  wrote:
> There may be a much simpler solution. Toasters have multiple > heating elements, so why not check whether they are all in series > or in a series/parallel arrangement. If they are in > series/parallel, then converting to series connection might > allow correct operation at 230V. > Manufacturers might make the elements operate at 115V each and > adjust the internal wiring to suit different markets. > > It may not work out, but it would be worth a look inside. > > The solenoid in the "pop-up" mechanism might be a bit harder > to deal with. > > John
Like. Solenoids operate so briefly they probably wouldn't mind. A series cap would be doable anyway. NT