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The internet of things, or the internet that sings?

Started by Jan Panteltje May 21, 2017
Whatever, been playing with those POE powered sensors,
small box, yesterday and 2day was the turn for a CO sensor.

Using a MQ-7 sensor, small boxes arrived, could finally put something together:
 http://www.panteltje.com/pub/CO_sensor_POE_UDP_PCB_IMG_6203.JPG
The upside-down sub-board is an ebay ethernet module, but it only has a ENC28J60 chip on it and I already replaced the ethernet connetor,
so next time I will just use the chip.. simpler,
domne that in my LED controller.

Anyways, this is NOT for 48 V POE but for <= 24 V, mainly because of the LM2296
Use an other sjip for higher voltage,

This is what the ciruit looks like in pencil:
 http://panteltje.com/pub/CO_sensor_UDP_POE_circuit_diagram_IMG_6204.JPG

And the test code (do not use, I have changed the 60 / 90 second delays to just 4 seconds...
else testing takes so long.. 
 http://panteltje.com/pub/co_sensor_udp_MQ-7_first_test_do_not_use_.asm
  anyways that is clearly marked in the code as ; WAS TEST 
  other things need checking too)

So, it sends UDP to some IP address and you probably noted the 2 x 4 holes on the board,
well the firts 4 are for the PIC programmer, and the other 4 for logic level RS232 for config,
if you type 'h' it shows this menu:

Panteltje (c) co_sensor_udp_MQ-7-0.1
                                    
                                    
      Commands
AnnnENTER       set source IP address A.xxx.xxx.xxx  saved in EEPROM
BnnnENTER       set source IP address xxx.B.xxx.xxx  saved in EEPROM
CnnnENTER       set source IP address xxx.xxx.C.xxx  saved in EEPROM
DnnnENTER       set source IP address xxx.xxx.xxx.D  saved in EEPROM
EnnnENTER       set destination IP address E.xxx.xxx.xxx  saved in EEPROM
FnnnENTER       set destination IP address xxx.F.xxx.xxx  saved in EEPROM
GnnnENTER       set destination IP address xxx.xxx.G.xxx  saved in EEPROM
HnnnENTER       set destination IP address xxx.xxx.xxx.H  saved in EEPROM
LnnnnnENTER     set source port, saved in EEPROM                         
PnnnnnENTER     set destination port, saved in EEPROM
S               show data on serial out              
s               do not show data on serial out, default.
v               print status, IP address, ports, and MACs
WnnnnnENTER     CO alarm beeper level, default 17, to disable local alarm beeper use 65535
XnnnENTER       PWM 1.5V level, default 29                                                
h               help (this)               

On the receiving side you could do
# netcat -u -l -p 1082
and then it looks like this:
392
394
392
394
398
396
395
394
394

Thse are for now actually ADC steps (x/1024 at 4.096 V PIC internal reference output from sensor into resistor),
so you need to calibrate and do that log thing,
have not decided yet if I wil do that on board or at the RX end (an UDOP server is running for all the sensors)

The missing thing here (see circuit diagram) is the alarm beeper / driver transistor,
as my alarm beeper did not fit in the box,
maybe I will find a smaller one.

So, that was / is the weekend tronix.

Linux snort:
05/21-17:43:23.853504 01:02:03:04:05:0B -> B8:27:EB:0A:2C:43 type:0x800 len:0x40
192.168.178.82:1082 -> 192.168.178.73:1082 UDP TTL:128 TOS:0x0 ID:46078 IpLen:20 DgmLen:33
Len: 5
33 39 30 0D 0A                                   390..

Food pizza!
The smell of molten lead...
I am still alive...


PS you have to think of a MAC addres for this thing, it is a #define in the code.
I keep making my own MACs.


Jan Panteltje <pNa0nStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Whatever, been playing with those POE powered sensors, > small box, yesterday and 2day was the turn for a CO sensor. > > Using a MQ-7 sensor, small boxes arrived, could finally put something together: > http://www.panteltje.com/pub/CO_sensor_POE_UDP_PCB_IMG_6203.JPG > The upside-down sub-board is an ebay ethernet module, but it only has a > ENC28J60 chip on it and I already replaced the ethernet connetor, > so next time I will just use the chip.. simpler, > domne that in my LED controller. > > Anyways, this is NOT for 48 V POE but for <= 24 V, mainly because of the LM2296 > Use an other sjip for higher voltage, > > This is what the ciruit looks like in pencil: > http://panteltje.com/pub/CO_sensor_UDP_POE_circuit_diagram_IMG_6204.JPG > > And the test code (do not use, I have changed the 60 / 90 second delays to just 4 seconds... > else testing takes so long.. > http://panteltje.com/pub/co_sensor_udp_MQ-7_first_test_do_not_use_.asm > anyways that is clearly marked in the code as ; WAS TEST > other things need checking too) > > So, it sends UDP to some IP address and you probably noted the 2 x 4 holes on the board, > well the firts 4 are for the PIC programmer, and the other 4 for logic level RS232 for config, > if you type 'h' it shows this menu: > > Panteltje (c) co_sensor_udp_MQ-7-0.1 > > > Commands > AnnnENTER set source IP address A.xxx.xxx.xxx saved in EEPROM > BnnnENTER set source IP address xxx.B.xxx.xxx saved in EEPROM > CnnnENTER set source IP address xxx.xxx.C.xxx saved in EEPROM > DnnnENTER set source IP address xxx.xxx.xxx.D saved in EEPROM > EnnnENTER set destination IP address E.xxx.xxx.xxx saved in EEPROM > FnnnENTER set destination IP address xxx.F.xxx.xxx saved in EEPROM > GnnnENTER set destination IP address xxx.xxx.G.xxx saved in EEPROM > HnnnENTER set destination IP address xxx.xxx.xxx.H saved in EEPROM > LnnnnnENTER set source port, saved in EEPROM > PnnnnnENTER set destination port, saved in EEPROM > S show data on serial out > s do not show data on serial out, default. > v print status, IP address, ports, and MACs > WnnnnnENTER CO alarm beeper level, default 17, to disable local alarm beeper use 65535 > XnnnENTER PWM 1.5V level, default 29 > h help (this) > > On the receiving side you could do > # netcat -u -l -p 1082 > and then it looks like this: > 392 > 394 > 392 > 394 > 398 > 396 > 395 > 394 > 394 > > Thse are for now actually ADC steps (x/1024 at 4.096 V PIC internal > reference output from sensor into resistor), > so you need to calibrate and do that log thing, > have not decided yet if I wil do that on board or at the RX end (an > UDOP server is running for all the sensors) > > The missing thing here (see circuit diagram) is the alarm beeper / > driver transistor, > as my alarm beeper did not fit in the box, > maybe I will find a smaller one. > > So, that was / is the weekend tronix. > > Linux snort: > 05/21-17:43:23.853504 01:02:03:04:05:0B -> B8:27:EB:0A:2C:43 type:0x800 len:0x40 > 192.168.178.82:1082 -> 192.168.178.73:1082 UDP TTL:128 TOS:0x0 ID:46078 IpLen:20 DgmLen:33 > Len: 5 > 33 39 30 0D 0A 390.. > > Food pizza! > The smell of molten lead... > I am still alive... > > > PS you have to think of a MAC addres for this thing, it is a #define in the code. > I keep making my own MACs.
Very impressive! That's one well earned pizza. In order to better follow along, my next parts order probably ought to include a PIC16F690 and a PIC18F14K22. You seem fond of both, judging by your PIC page. Thank you, -- Don Kuenz KB7RPU
On a sunny day (Sun, 21 May 2017 23:07:07 -0000 (UTC)) it happened Don Kuenz
<g@crcomp.net> wrote in <201700521e@crcomp.net>:

>Jan Panteltje <pNa0nStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote: >> Food pizza! >> The smell of molten lead... >> I am still alive... >> >> >> PS you have to think of a MAC addres for this thing, it is a #define in the code. >> I keep making my own MACs. > >Very impressive! That's one well earned pizza.
Thank you.
>In order to better follow along, my next parts order probably ought to >include a PIC16F690 and a PIC18F14K22. You seem fond of both, judging by >your PIC page.
I used the 16F690 in the past, then changed to 18F14K22 (on recommendation of I think it was Sphero). The 16F has 'banking', making life a bit more complicated, the 18F is more linear to program and has a more powerful instruction set, faster too. I save tons of time by having just 'standardized' on the 18F14K22, as I can just paste asm code from one project to the other with minor changes. Wrote a whole lot of libraries by now . I am making a web page for the CO sensor, the code worked OK all night. On the server side it is logged, and a big alarm goes of if either the level is too high, or the data is no longer received. This 24V system design is for a boat, those have nasty places where CO can accumulate, but it works fine at home too. Will post a link to the web page when the final code is ready.
>Will post a link to the web page when the final code is ready.
http://panteltje.com/panteltje/pic/co_pic_udp/
 http://panteltje.com/panteltje/pic/co_pic_udp/

PS
 I also received 2 DHT22 humidity and temperature sensors.

Those seem to be a lot more accurate than the DHT11.
Just have to put it in an other box, maybe weekend.   

DHT22 hanging outside..

So                              
 http://panteltje.com/pub/co_rh_temp.gif

More things...

Will make a website for DHT22 too.