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Combating Zener Jitter

Started by Chris May 21, 2017
On a sunny day (Tue, 23 May 2017 09:06:06 -0700) it happened John Larkin
<jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote in
<19m8ictl25ltljji98fp9m0854cvrgpp86@4ax.com>:

>I think I got that one after a short brainstorming session with Tye. >Imago was in the VC/file-lots-of-patents phase, so they filed it. I >discovered the patent accidentally during a web search. I suppose I >signed something at some point, but I'd forgotten. > >https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Gear/Anodes.JPG
No idea how it works but it does remind me of a rear-window heater,
On Tue, 23 May 2017 17:46:05 GMT, Jan Panteltje
<pNa0nStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

>On a sunny day (Tue, 23 May 2017 09:06:06 -0700) it happened John Larkin ><jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote in ><19m8ictl25ltljji98fp9m0854cvrgpp86@4ax.com>: > >>I think I got that one after a short brainstorming session with Tye. >>Imago was in the VC/file-lots-of-patents phase, so they filed it. I >>discovered the patent accidentally during a web search. I suppose I >>signed something at some point, but I'd forgotten. >> >>https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Gear/Anodes.JPG > >No idea how it works but it does remind me of a rear-window heater,
This explains the delay-line detector idea pretty well. www.chem.ucla.edu/~michalet/papers/IEEE2005.pdf The tomographic atom probe rips a sample apart one atom at a time and measures the XY position and time-of-flight, to reconstruct a 3D image of a sample. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc picosecond timing precision measurement jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com http://www.highlandtechnology.com
On a sunny day (Tue, 23 May 2017 11:18:57 -0700) it happened John Larkin
<jjlarkin@highland_snip_technology.com> wrote in
<s0v8icl0730vbu3sflob86gmp3mumqmv97@4ax.com>:

>On Tue, 23 May 2017 17:46:05 GMT, Jan Panteltje ><pNa0nStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote: > >>On a sunny day (Tue, 23 May 2017 09:06:06 -0700) it happened John Larkin >><jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote in >><19m8ictl25ltljji98fp9m0854cvrgpp86@4ax.com>: >> >>>I think I got that one after a short brainstorming session with Tye. >>>Imago was in the VC/file-lots-of-patents phase, so they filed it. I >>>discovered the patent accidentally during a web search. I suppose I >>>signed something at some point, but I'd forgotten. >>> >>>https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Gear/Anodes.JPG >> >>No idea how it works but it does remind me of a rear-window heater, > >This explains the delay-line detector idea pretty well. > >www.chem.ucla.edu/~michalet/papers/IEEE2005.pdf > >The tomographic atom probe rips a sample apart one atom at a time and >measures the XY position and time-of-flight, to reconstruct a 3D image >of a sample.
Very interesting concept. Using x and y delay lines, had not seen that one before. Thanks
On Tue, 23 May 2017 19:35:38 GMT, Jan Panteltje
<pNa0nStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

>On a sunny day (Tue, 23 May 2017 11:18:57 -0700) it happened John Larkin ><jjlarkin@highland_snip_technology.com> wrote in ><s0v8icl0730vbu3sflob86gmp3mumqmv97@4ax.com>: > >>On Tue, 23 May 2017 17:46:05 GMT, Jan Panteltje >><pNa0nStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote: >> >>>On a sunny day (Tue, 23 May 2017 09:06:06 -0700) it happened John Larkin >>><jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote in >>><19m8ictl25ltljji98fp9m0854cvrgpp86@4ax.com>: >>> >>>>I think I got that one after a short brainstorming session with Tye. >>>>Imago was in the VC/file-lots-of-patents phase, so they filed it. I >>>>discovered the patent accidentally during a web search. I suppose I >>>>signed something at some point, but I'd forgotten. >>>> >>>>https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Gear/Anodes.JPG >>> >>>No idea how it works but it does remind me of a rear-window heater, >> >>This explains the delay-line detector idea pretty well. >> >>www.chem.ucla.edu/~michalet/papers/IEEE2005.pdf >> >>The tomographic atom probe rips a sample apart one atom at a time and >>measures the XY position and time-of-flight, to reconstruct a 3D image >>of a sample. > >Very interesting concept. >Using x and y delay lines, had not seen that one before. >Thanks
There's also an imaging technique, also used with microchannel plates, that uses resistive charge distribution to get the X-Y coordinates, based on amplitudes instead of time. There are fun things you can do with the delay-line imager, like crosscheck timings to untangle multiple-particle pileups and such. You could probably make a 2D delay line with optical fibers instead of conductors. Much less loss. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc lunatic fringe electronics
On a sunny day (Tue, 23 May 2017 21:18:14 -0700) it happened John Larkin
<jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote in
<v22aic95vjaajp5asr54h6bg3ue3i42g0n@4ax.com>:

>On Tue, 23 May 2017 19:35:38 GMT, Jan Panteltje ><pNa0nStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote: > >>On a sunny day (Tue, 23 May 2017 11:18:57 -0700) it happened John Larkin >><jjlarkin@highland_snip_technology.com> wrote in >><s0v8icl0730vbu3sflob86gmp3mumqmv97@4ax.com>: >> >>>On Tue, 23 May 2017 17:46:05 GMT, Jan Panteltje >>><pNa0nStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote: >>> >>>>On a sunny day (Tue, 23 May 2017 09:06:06 -0700) it happened John Larkin >>>><jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote in >>>><19m8ictl25ltljji98fp9m0854cvrgpp86@4ax.com>: >>>> >>>>>I think I got that one after a short brainstorming session with Tye. >>>>>Imago was in the VC/file-lots-of-patents phase, so they filed it. I >>>>>discovered the patent accidentally during a web search. I suppose I >>>>>signed something at some point, but I'd forgotten. >>>>> >>>>>https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Gear/Anodes.JPG >>>> >>>>No idea how it works but it does remind me of a rear-window heater, >>> >>>This explains the delay-line detector idea pretty well. >>> >>>www.chem.ucla.edu/~michalet/papers/IEEE2005.pdf >>> >>>The tomographic atom probe rips a sample apart one atom at a time and >>>measures the XY position and time-of-flight, to reconstruct a 3D image >>>of a sample. >> >>Very interesting concept. >>Using x and y delay lines, had not seen that one before. >>Thanks > >There's also an imaging technique, also used with microchannel plates, >that uses resistive charge distribution to get the X-Y coordinates, >based on amplitudes instead of time. > >There are fun things you can do with the delay-line imager, like >crosscheck timings to untangle multiple-particle pileups and such. > >You could probably make a 2D delay line with optical fibers instead of >conductors. Much less loss.
In 1973 or there about when I worked in the TV studio, one of the engineers came to me with a an enlarged microfilm of a patent for a video recorder and asked me if I could make any sense of it. It was given to him by the local electronics shop. Video recording was my field there. The system had a name, cannot remember, will let you know if it comes back to me. That patent used one vertical oriented delay line that put charge on a vinyl tape that moved passed it, that way recording the charge pattern (image). I could not say it was wrong, but told him it was in my view not very likely that charge patterns would stay intact on a rolled up vinyl tape for any length of time. That idea never made it to market AFAIK.
> >In 1973 or there about when I worked in the TV studio, >one of the engineers came to me with a an enlarged microfilm of a patent >for a video recorder and asked me if I could make any sense of it. >It was given to him by the local electronics shop. >Video recording was my field there. >The system had a name, cannot remember, will let you know if it comes back to me.
It was called 'Ventiel Raster Diode'. That was Dutch and translated means something like 'one way raster diode'. Googling gives zero hits. Maybe the tape was coated to prevent the charge leaking, was not very clear or complete.
>That patent used one vertical oriented delay line that put charge on a vinyl tape >that moved passed it, that way recording the charge pattern (image). >I could not say it was wrong, but told him it was in my view not very likely >that charge patterns would stay intact on a rolled up vinyl tape for any length of time. >That idea never made it to market AFAIK. >
On 25/05/17 17:40, Jan Panteltje wrote:
> >> >> In 1973 or there about when I worked in the TV studio, >> one of the engineers came to me with a an enlarged microfilm of a patent >> for a video recorder and asked me if I could make any sense of it. >> It was given to him by the local electronics shop. >> Video recording was my field there. >> The system had a name, cannot remember, will let you know if it comes back to me. > > It was called 'Ventiel Raster Diode'. > That was Dutch and translated means something like 'one way raster diode'. > Googling gives zero hits. > Maybe the tape was coated to prevent the charge leaking, was not very clear or complete.
Maybe it was called "one way" because you could record, but not play back?
On a sunny day (Thu, 25 May 2017 17:44:36 +1000) it happened Clifford Heath
<no.spam@please.net> wrote in <pYvVA.48432$Cj6.25910@fx23.iad>:

>On 25/05/17 17:40, Jan Panteltje wrote: >> >>> >>> In 1973 or there about when I worked in the TV studio, >>> one of the engineers came to me with a an enlarged microfilm of a patent >>> for a video recorder and asked me if I could make any sense of it. >>> It was given to him by the local electronics shop. >>> Video recording was my field there. >>> The system had a name, cannot remember, will let you know if it comes back to me. >> >> It was called 'Ventiel Raster Diode'. >> That was Dutch and translated means something like 'one way raster diode'. >> Googling gives zero hits. >> Maybe the tape was coated to prevent the charge leaking, was not very clear or complete. > >Maybe it was called "one way" because you could record, but not play back?
Yes, that is it!
On Wed, 24 May 2017 16:35:49 GMT, Jan Panteltje
<pNa0nStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

>On a sunny day (Tue, 23 May 2017 21:18:14 -0700) it happened John Larkin ><jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote in ><v22aic95vjaajp5asr54h6bg3ue3i42g0n@4ax.com>: > >>On Tue, 23 May 2017 19:35:38 GMT, Jan Panteltje >><pNa0nStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote: >> >>>On a sunny day (Tue, 23 May 2017 11:18:57 -0700) it happened John Larkin >>><jjlarkin@highland_snip_technology.com> wrote in >>><s0v8icl0730vbu3sflob86gmp3mumqmv97@4ax.com>: >>> >>>>On Tue, 23 May 2017 17:46:05 GMT, Jan Panteltje >>>><pNa0nStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote: >>>> >>>>>On a sunny day (Tue, 23 May 2017 09:06:06 -0700) it happened John Larkin >>>>><jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote in >>>>><19m8ictl25ltljji98fp9m0854cvrgpp86@4ax.com>: >>>>> >>>>>>I think I got that one after a short brainstorming session with Tye. >>>>>>Imago was in the VC/file-lots-of-patents phase, so they filed it. I >>>>>>discovered the patent accidentally during a web search. I suppose I >>>>>>signed something at some point, but I'd forgotten. >>>>>> >>>>>>https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Gear/Anodes.JPG >>>>> >>>>>No idea how it works but it does remind me of a rear-window heater, >>>> >>>>This explains the delay-line detector idea pretty well. >>>> >>>>www.chem.ucla.edu/~michalet/papers/IEEE2005.pdf >>>> >>>>The tomographic atom probe rips a sample apart one atom at a time and >>>>measures the XY position and time-of-flight, to reconstruct a 3D image >>>>of a sample. >>> >>>Very interesting concept. >>>Using x and y delay lines, had not seen that one before. >>>Thanks >> >>There's also an imaging technique, also used with microchannel plates, >>that uses resistive charge distribution to get the X-Y coordinates, >>based on amplitudes instead of time. >> >>There are fun things you can do with the delay-line imager, like >>crosscheck timings to untangle multiple-particle pileups and such. >> >>You could probably make a 2D delay line with optical fibers instead of >>conductors. Much less loss. > >In 1973 or there about when I worked in the TV studio, >one of the engineers came to me with a an enlarged microfilm of a patent >for a video recorder and asked me if I could make any sense of it. >It was given to him by the local electronics shop. >Video recording was my field there. >The system had a name, cannot remember, will let you know if it comes back to me. >That patent used one vertical oriented delay line that put charge on a vinyl tape >that moved passed it, that way recording the charge pattern (image). >I could not say it was wrong, but told him it was in my view not very likely >that charge patterns would stay intact on a rolled up vinyl tape for any length of time. >That idea never made it to market AFAIK.
Did it heat the tape during recording? Possibly electret charging. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc lunatic fringe electronics
On a sunny day (Thu, 25 May 2017 08:12:17 -0700) it happened John Larkin
<jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote in
<51tdicptm2lhskrpasur2j4b3gtermn2mm@4ax.com>:

>On Wed, 24 May 2017 16:35:49 GMT, Jan Panteltje ><pNa0nStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>In 1973 or there about when I worked in the TV studio, >>one of the engineers came to me with a an enlarged microfilm of a patent >>for a video recorder and asked me if I could make any sense of it. >>It was given to him by the local electronics shop. >>Video recording was my field there. >>The system had a name, cannot remember, will let you know if it comes back to me. >>That patent used one vertical oriented delay line that put charge on a vinyl tape >>that moved passed it, that way recording the charge pattern (image). >>I could not say it was wrong, but told him it was in my view not very likely >>that charge patterns would stay intact on a rolled up vinyl tape for any length of time. >>That idea never made it to market AFAIK. > >Did it heat the tape during recording? Possibly electret charging.
Not that I know.