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Can powerbanks shorten lithium battery life ?

Started by Andy K October 3, 2016
I have a powerbank that I use to charge my cell phone.

10,400 ma is it's capacity.

Output 3.7 V

It has 2 outputs.

1.0 and 2.1 amps and I use the 2.1 amp

My cell battery is about one yr old. (Replacement for orig battery)

After charging the battery, it only lasts about 2 days before going dead.

During those 2 days, there was no cell phone usage.

Battery capacity is listed as 850 Mah.

Does it look like my battery capacity is seriously degraded ?

Believe it or not it depends on location. If you are far from a tower it uses more transmit power. Ever hear of "cellphone killer buildings" ? That is like some hospitals etc. that have the type of construction your wavelength doesn't go through all that well.

The cellphone keeps upping its transmit power to "touch base" with the nearest tower and it ain't getting it, so it kills your battery. 

Also, you can't just charge those things like a car battery. 

If the battery is in the phone that is one thing, but if you rigged up some sort of connection outside that will burn it up, maybe even make it explode. 

If it is in the phone and this is like a USB connection or whatever, you probably just got an inferior quality battery. It may have say on a shelf and that is not good for them. It could be just as old as the old one, since they keep on changing styles/formfactors. in other words they are not making new batteries for my 30 year old flip phone. Aftermarket batteries are only made for phones that are only a few years old, otherwise the market is just not there.
On 10/3/2016 11:38 AM, Andy K wrote:
> I have a powerbank that I use to charge my cell phone. > > 10,400 ma is it's capacity. > > Output 3.7 V > > It has 2 outputs. > > 1.0 and 2.1 amps and I use the 2.1 amp > > My cell battery is about one yr old. (Replacement for orig battery) > > After charging the battery, it only lasts about 2 days before going dead. > > During those 2 days, there was no cell phone usage. > > Battery capacity is listed as 850 Mah. > > Does it look like my battery capacity is seriously degraded ? >
Charging a battery directly from a power source with no charge controller in between is a recipe for trouble (and in some cases disaster). Use a proper charger. You may have killed the cell phone battery already - or, if you're lucky, simply not have charged it fully. Ed
On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 3:30:29 PM UTC-5, jurb...@gmail.com wrote:
> Believe it or not it depends on location. If you are far from a tower it uses more transmit power. Ever hear of "cellphone killer buildings" ? That is like some hospitals etc. that have the type of construction your wavelength doesn't go through all that well. > > The cellphone keeps upping its transmit power to "touch base" with the nearest tower and it ain't getting it, so it kills your battery. > > Also, you can't just charge those things like a car battery. > > If the battery is in the phone that is one thing, but if you rigged up some sort of connection outside that will burn it up, maybe even make it explode. > > If it is in the phone and this is like a USB connection or whatever, you probably just got an inferior quality battery. It may have say on a shelf and that is not good for them. It could be just as old as the old one, since they keep on changing styles/formfactors. in other words they are not making new batteries for my 30 year old flip phone. Aftermarket batteries are only made for phones that are only a few years old, otherwise the market is just not there.
Evidently you do not understand my post. I said that the cell phone was NOT used, so distance from a tower is not a factor. Charging my fone using a power bank is resulting in a shorter battery life than when using a wall charger. Maybe the power bank has a poor circuit that allows overcharging of my cell phone battery ? I would think the cell phone would have circuitry that would prevent that, but who knows. And no, I did not rig anything up. :-) I did notice something odd. The no load voltage output of the power bank is 3.4 volts. Seems low for charging a 3.7 v battery. Andy
On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 5:53:44 PM UTC-5, ehsjr wrote:
> On 10/3/2016 11:38 AM, Andy K wrote: > > I have a powerbank that I use to charge my cell phone. > > > > 10,400 ma is it's capacity. > > > > Output 3.7 V > > > > It has 2 outputs. > > > > 1.0 and 2.1 amps and I use the 2.1 amp > > > > My cell battery is about one yr old. (Replacement for orig battery) > > > > After charging the battery, it only lasts about 2 days before going dead. > > > > During those 2 days, there was no cell phone usage. > > > > Battery capacity is listed as 850 Mah. > > > > Does it look like my battery capacity is seriously degraded ? > > > > Charging a battery directly from a power source with no charge > controller in between is a recipe for trouble (and in some cases > disaster). Use a proper charger. You may have killed the cell > phone battery already - or, if you're lucky, simply not have > charged it fully. > > Ed
Cell phone shows full charge. What's the point in a power bank then ? The cell phone battery will never be 100 percent charged. So it's charging the cell phone battery is assumed. Andy
On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 6:00:46 PM UTC-5, Andy K wrote:
> On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 5:53:44 PM UTC-5, ehsjr wrote: > > On 10/3/2016 11:38 AM, Andy K wrote: > > > I have a powerbank that I use to charge my cell phone. > > > > > > 10,400 ma is it's capacity. > > > > > > Output 3.7 V > > > > > > It has 2 outputs. > > > > > > 1.0 and 2.1 amps and I use the 2.1 amp > > > > > > My cell battery is about one yr old. (Replacement for orig battery) > > > > > > After charging the battery, it only lasts about 2 days before going dead. > > > > > > During those 2 days, there was no cell phone usage. > > > > > > Battery capacity is listed as 850 Mah. > > > > > > Does it look like my battery capacity is seriously degraded ? > > > > > > > Charging a battery directly from a power source with no charge > > controller in between is a recipe for trouble (and in some cases > > disaster). Use a proper charger. You may have killed the cell > > phone battery already - or, if you're lucky, simply not have > > charged it fully. > > > > Ed > > Cell phone shows full charge. > > What's the point in a power bank then ? > > The cell phone battery will never be 100 percent charged. > > So it's charging the cell phone battery is assumed. > > Andy
And I would think that the cell phone would have circuitry that would prevent overcharging. But who knows how it was built, but I would think AT&T would build it well. If the phone dies, they lose income.
On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 3:57:50 PM UTC-7, Andy K wrote:
...
> Evidently you do not understand my post. > > I said that the cell phone was NOT used, so distance from a tower is not a factor.
...
> Andy
Was the phone switched on? Even if not used for a call, the location of the cell towers, the particular protocols they support and the signal propagation can dramatically affect the time the phone can stand in standby. At one place I worked my phone would not last 8 hours even when not used; I would attempt to use it late in the day for the first time and the battery would be dead. At home or my previous (and subsequent) work place it would last about two days. I surmised that it was not the signal strength but the fact that the location was between two base stations and the phone seemed to be constantly switching from one to another that was draining the battery. This was using Verizon service about 8 years ago. kevin
On Mon, 03 Oct 2016 15:57:28 -0700, Andy K wrote:

> On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 3:30:29 PM UTC-5, jurb...@gmail.com wrote: >> Believe it or not it depends on location. If you are far from a tower >> it uses more transmit power. Ever hear of "cellphone killer buildings" >> ? That is like some hospitals etc. that have the type of construction >> your wavelength doesn't go through all that well. >> >> The cellphone keeps upping its transmit power to "touch base" with the >> nearest tower and it ain't getting it, so it kills your battery. >> >> Also, you can't just charge those things like a car battery. >> >> If the battery is in the phone that is one thing, but if you rigged up >> some sort of connection outside that will burn it up, maybe even make >> it explode. >> >> If it is in the phone and this is like a USB connection or whatever, >> you probably just got an inferior quality battery. It may have say on a >> shelf and that is not good for them. It could be just as old as the old >> one, since they keep on changing styles/formfactors. in other words >> they are not making new batteries for my 30 year old flip phone. >> Aftermarket batteries are only made for phones that are only a few >> years old, otherwise the market is just not there. > > Evidently you do not understand my post. > > I said that the cell phone was NOT used, so distance from a tower is not > a factor.
"Used" and "on" are two different things. If it's on, and in a fringe area, the power will go down even if you aren't yakking on it, because the phone stays in touch with the tower at all times. Clarify, please. -- Tim Wescott Wescott Design Services http://www.wescottdesign.com I'm looking for work -- see my website!
On Mon, 3 Oct 2016 16:00:41 -0700 (PDT), Andy K
<andrew_kennedy7@yahoo.com> wrote:

>On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 5:53:44 PM UTC-5, ehsjr wrote: >> On 10/3/2016 11:38 AM, Andy K wrote: >> > I have a powerbank that I use to charge my cell phone. >> > >> > 10,400 ma is it's capacity. >> > >> > Output 3.7 V >> > >> > It has 2 outputs. >> > >> > 1.0 and 2.1 amps and I use the 2.1 amp >> > >> > My cell battery is about one yr old. (Replacement for orig battery) >> > >> > After charging the battery, it only lasts about 2 days before going dead. >> > >> > During those 2 days, there was no cell phone usage. >> > >> > Battery capacity is listed as 850 Mah. >> > >> > Does it look like my battery capacity is seriously degraded ? >> > >> >> Charging a battery directly from a power source with no charge >> controller in between is a recipe for trouble (and in some cases >> disaster). Use a proper charger. You may have killed the cell >> phone battery already - or, if you're lucky, simply not have >> charged it fully. >> >> Ed > >Cell phone shows full charge. > >What's the point in a power bank then ?
...whatever a "power bank" is. Was it specifically designed for that phone/battery? If no, it has no purpose. BTW, 3.7V sounds pretty high for a charger but it's possible to get away with it if the charge controller is really good.
> >The cell phone battery will never be 100 percent charged.
Why?
>So it's charging the cell phone battery is assumed. >
Huh?
On Mon, 3 Oct 2016 16:03:09 -0700 (PDT), Andy K
<andrew_kennedy7@yahoo.com> wrote:

>On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 6:00:46 PM UTC-5, Andy K wrote: >> On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 5:53:44 PM UTC-5, ehsjr wrote: >> > On 10/3/2016 11:38 AM, Andy K wrote: >> > > I have a powerbank that I use to charge my cell phone. >> > > >> > > 10,400 ma is it's capacity. >> > > >> > > Output 3.7 V >> > > >> > > It has 2 outputs. >> > > >> > > 1.0 and 2.1 amps and I use the 2.1 amp >> > > >> > > My cell battery is about one yr old. (Replacement for orig battery) >> > > >> > > After charging the battery, it only lasts about 2 days before going dead. >> > > >> > > During those 2 days, there was no cell phone usage. >> > > >> > > Battery capacity is listed as 850 Mah. >> > > >> > > Does it look like my battery capacity is seriously degraded ? >> > > >> > >> > Charging a battery directly from a power source with no charge >> > controller in between is a recipe for trouble (and in some cases >> > disaster). Use a proper charger. You may have killed the cell >> > phone battery already - or, if you're lucky, simply not have >> > charged it fully. >> > >> > Ed >> >> Cell phone shows full charge. >> >> What's the point in a power bank then ? >> >> The cell phone battery will never be 100 percent charged. >> >> So it's charging the cell phone battery is assumed. >> >> Andy > >And I would think that the cell phone would have circuitry that would prevent overcharging.
Who knows what's going on. You give no specifics. 3.7V doesn't sound right for a cell phone charger, at least these days. Most use USB (5V) and do all the charge controlling inside. What you have is anyone's guess (and you're not providing enough clues).
>But who knows how it was built, but I would think AT&T would build it well.
AT&T doesn't make cell phones.
>If the phone dies, they lose income.
No, they make more, when you buy a new phone.