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DC DC Converter

Started by Unknown July 18, 2016
Hi, anyone know about a DC DC converter with an input range of 300VDC to 450VDC, with an output range of 12VDC to 14VDC at 50A? thanks.
On Mon, 18 Jul 2016 16:16:12 -0700 (PDT), orendain.hw@gmail.com wrote:

>Hi, anyone know about a DC DC converter with an input range of 300VDC to 450VDC, with an output range of 12VDC to 14VDC at 50A? thanks.
400 volt intermediate bus power systems are fairly common. Vicor does that, but Vicor is expensive. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc picosecond timing precision measurement jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com http://www.highlandtechnology.com
John Larkin wrote...
> >On Mon, 18 Jul 2016 16:16:12 -0700 (PDT), orendain.hw@gmail.com wrote: > >>Hi, anyone know about a DC DC converter with an input range of 300VDC to 450VDC, >>with an output range of 12VDC to 14VDC at 50A? thanks. > >400 volt intermediate bus power systems are fairly common. Vicor does >that, but Vicor is expensive. > >
-- Thanks, - Win
On Mon, 18 Jul 2016 16:16:12 -0700 (PDT), orendain.hw@gmail.com wrote:

>Hi, anyone know about a DC DC converter with an input range of 300VDC to 450VDC, with an output range of 12VDC to 14VDC at 50A? thanks.
The output half of a PC power supply with a bit of modification?
John Larkin wrote...
> > orendain.hw wrote: > >> anyone know about a DC DC converter with an input range of > 300VDC to 450VDC, with an output range of 12VDC to 14VDC at 50A? > > 400 volt intermediate bus power systems are fairly common. > Vicor does that, but Vicor is expensive.
I'd like to point out two things. First, most AC-to-DC power supplies will in fact work from from a DC input. After all, most such supplies feature a full-wave input rectifier. E.g., 230 Vac => 310 volts DC on the bulk capacitor. In most cases you can apply a similar DC voltage to the AC input. Second, high-power supplies with PFC-correction input-boost stages have roughly 400V bulk capacitors. In principle one could bypass the PFC boost, and applying DC to this capacitor. Inrush currents, protective fusing, and all component voltage ratings would have to be respected, with safety margins. But this opens a huge range of possible working solutions. -- Thanks, - Win
"Winfield Hill" <hill@rowland.harvard.edu> wrote in message 
news:nmjvm3025o8@drn.newsguy.com...
> Second, high-power supplies with PFC-correction input-boost > stages have roughly 400V bulk capacitors. In principle one > could bypass the PFC boost, and applying DC to this capacitor. > Inrush currents, protective fusing, and all component voltage > ratings would have to be respected, with safety margins. > > But this opens a huge range of possible working solutions.
The downside is, a lot of PFC circuits assume mains frequency pulsating input (or full-on AC, for the boost-rectifier ones), and misbehave for weird voltage waveforms or DC. So, it depends how much you want to go snooping around in a given PSU module, say tacking on a bodgewire somewhere, or worse... Which I suppose is repeating what you just said... :-) ...So...now I'm curious, has anyone actually (i.e. in production) taken a non-potted module, added bodgewires, and customized them for an application? I'd imagine the main downside is, having to go through testing anyway. But most products run the gauntlet anyways, regardless of what the module is rated for*, so is it really adding cost to the design beyond the labor itself? *Most PC mounted PSU modules are terrible at filtering. The small bricks have no EMI filter; most modestly sized ones do, but they normally blow FCC regs by 3-10dB, say, once you attach a useful length of wire to them. The "medical grade" ones I've seen (specifically, a one of these http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/xp-power/EML15US12-P/1470-2618-ND/4809088 ) do very nicely though, not needing any external filtering to /pass/ with the same margin; and with far more margin on average (over the whole frequency range). I suppose "tampering" with a module would run most afoul of UL, but I don't know what specifically would be violated in the process. Tim -- Seven Transistor Labs, LLC Electrical Engineering Consultation and Contract Design Website: http://seventransistorlabs.com
On Mon, 18 Jul 2016 16:27:56 -0700, John Larkin
<jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote:

>On Mon, 18 Jul 2016 16:16:12 -0700 (PDT), orendain.hw@gmail.com wrote: > >>Hi, anyone know about a DC DC converter with an input range of 300VDC to 450VDC, with an output range of 12VDC to 14VDC at 50A? thanks. > >400 volt intermediate bus power systems are fairly common. Vicor does >that, but Vicor is expensive.
Are you referring to the +/-190 Vdc (380 Vdc) computer server room voltage standard ?
On Tue, 19 Jul 2016 11:18:06 +0300, upsidedown@downunder.com wrote:

>On Mon, 18 Jul 2016 16:27:56 -0700, John Larkin ><jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote: > >>On Mon, 18 Jul 2016 16:16:12 -0700 (PDT), orendain.hw@gmail.com wrote: >> >>>Hi, anyone know about a DC DC converter with an input range of 300VDC to 450VDC, with an output range of 12VDC to 14VDC at 50A? thanks. >> >>400 volt intermediate bus power systems are fairly common. Vicor does >>that, but Vicor is expensive. > >Are you referring to the +/-190 Vdc (380 Vdc) computer server room >voltage standard ? >
Not specifically. I recall that several people, including Vicor, make PFC ac-to-400 volt converters, non-isolated, and then sell isolated DC-to-whatever bricks for point-of-load power. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc lunatic fringe electronics
On Mon, 18 Jul 2016 16:16:12 -0700, orendain.hw wrote:

> Hi, anyone know about a DC DC converter with an input range of 300VDC to > 450VDC, with an output range of 12VDC to 14VDC at 50A? thanks.
Artesyn makes several HV dc/dc bricks. Look at the AIF series. There is a industry group trying to push the HV dc data center. I think it is called EMerge or something like that. -- Chisolm Republic of Texas
On 2016-07-18 16:16, orendain.hw@gmail.com wrote:
> Hi, anyone know about a DC DC converter with an input range of 300VDC > to 450VDC, with an output range of 12VDC to 14VDC at 50A? thanks. >
Voila: http://www.tdipower.com/PRODUCTS/dc_dc_converters/liquid-cooled-3kw-400vdc.html Though a bit more power than you want. Might have to ask them for smaller models. -- Regards, Joerg http://www.analogconsultants.com/