Forums

arduino pro mini vs Nano

Started by dcas...@krl.org May 13, 2016
Just some thoughts that may help someone.

To get started I would recommend the Nano.  You just need it , a usb cable, and the IDE downloaded.  The Nano has a usb chip on the module.  No hassles about connecting.

The pro mini does not  have a usb chip, but is otherwise the same.  To use it you need a usb to TTL adapter.  I bought an adapter with a FDTI232 chip and could not get it to work.  So looked on the internet and found some of the FDTI chips are counterfeit and do not work , or do not work well.  So I ordered a translator with a CH340G chip and that works.  Connecting the TTL translator to the mini pro is done with five jumpers.  Not difficult but a little more work.

Buying off Alli the translator module was $1.40 and the mini pro $1.25.

                                          Dan
dcaster@krl.org schrieb:
> Just some thoughts that may help someone. > > To get started I would recommend the Nano. You just need it , a usb > cable, and the IDE downloaded. The Nano has a usb chip on the > module. No hassles about connecting. > > The pro mini does not have a usb chip, but is otherwise the same. > To use it you need a usb to TTL adapter.
In my first try I unplugged the controller from my Uno board, and connected the required pins to the Mini :-) DoDi
On Sat, 14 May 2016 15:48:42 +0200, Hans-Peter Diettrich
<DrDiettrich1@aol.com> Gave us:

>dcaster@krl.org schrieb: >> Just some thoughts that may help someone. >> >> To get started I would recommend the Nano. You just need it , a usb >> cable, and the IDE downloaded. The Nano has a usb chip on the >> module. No hassles about connecting. >> >> The pro mini does not have a usb chip, but is otherwise the same. >> To use it you need a usb to TTL adapter. > >In my first try I unplugged the controller from my Uno board, and >connected the required pins to the Mini :-) > >DoDi
Use SolidRun products! :-)
dcaster@krl.org wrote...
> > To get started I would recommend the Nano ... > has a usb chip on the module. > > The pro mini does not have a usb chip ...
I chose a Nano to control stuff mounted on a complex PCB. Ended up using all the pins and wishing for more, but appreciated its small size. Coulda mount an ATmega328p on my pcb and skipped the Nano, but I liked the idea of a replaceable controller part. (OK, coulda used the 328p's DIP version.) Now I regret being forced to locate the controller socket on the PCB up against the panel to expose the USB connector. If I'd used a Mini, I coulda located it anywhere, just a USB jack at the panel. Oops, Mini has fewer pins, not good. Two comments on the Nano. $3 versions from China work just fine. Nice. ST's STM32 ARM Cortex M0 to M4 Nucleo-32 boards have the same Nano pinout, but you get lots more speed and capability. Selling for $10 up at Digi-Key. But oops!! ST's PCB is a bit longer, and the USB jack is on the wrong end! so you can't upgrade existing designs. -- Thanks, - Win
On 14 May 2016 12:08:58 -0700, the renowned Winfield Hill
<hill@rowland.harvard.edu> wrote:

>dcaster@krl.org wrote... >> >> To get started I would recommend the Nano ... >> has a usb chip on the module. >> >> The pro mini does not have a usb chip ... > > I chose a Nano to control stuff mounted on > a complex PCB. Ended up using all the pins > and wishing for more, but appreciated its > small size. Coulda mount an ATmega328p on > my pcb and skipped the Nano, but I liked > the idea of a replaceable controller part. > (OK, coulda used the 328p's DIP version.) > > Now I regret being forced to locate the > controller socket on the PCB up against > the panel to expose the USB connector. > If I'd used a Mini, I coulda located it > anywhere, just a USB jack at the panel. > Oops, Mini has fewer pins, not good. > > Two comments on the Nano. $3 versions > from China work just fine. Nice.
The $2 ones have a USB-serial chip that does not have a signed driver (there exists a perfectly good driver, but it's not signed). No problem for XP, but for Win7 and later ( and MacOS) you have disable all driver signing for that bootup (or permanently, which is a security hole). No way, that I know of, to make a permanent exception for that driver.
> > ST's STM32 ARM Cortex M0 to M4 Nucleo-32 > boards have the same Nano pinout, but > you get lots more speed and capability. > Selling for $10 up at Digi-Key. > > But oops!! ST's PCB is a bit longer, > and the USB jack is on the wrong end! > so you can't upgrade existing designs.
--sp -- Best regards, Spehro Pefhany Amazon link for AoE 3rd Edition: http://tinyurl.com/ntrpwu8
Spehro Pefhany wrote...
> >> Two comments on the Nano. $3 versions >> from China work just fine. Nice. > > The $2 ones have a USB-serial chip that does not > have a signed driver (there exists a perfectly > good driver, but it's not signed). No problem > for XP, but for Win7 and later ( and MacOS) > you have disable all driver signing for that > bootup (or permanently, which is a security hole). > No way, that I know of, to make a permanent > exception for that driver.
I dunno what you're talking about. Rumors prepared me for a struggle, but my stock version of Windows 7 came with the CH340 driver already installed by Microsoft, and it always works. This is the case for three different machines with three different copies of Windows Ultimate. In fact, it's the Nano with FTDI that I've had trouble with. They mostly work, but sometimes not (USB connects, but no COM port gets assigned). But it's not bricked, later the same board works again. BTW, other Arduino boards with software USB emulators always work fine for me. -- Thanks, - Win
On 14 May 2016 12:33:00 -0700, Winfield Hill <hill@rowland.harvard.edu>
Gave us:

>Spehro Pefhany wrote... >> >>> Two comments on the Nano. $3 versions >>> from China work just fine. Nice. >> >> The $2 ones have a USB-serial chip that does not >> have a signed driver (there exists a perfectly >> good driver, but it's not signed). No problem >> for XP, but for Win7 and later ( and MacOS) >> you have disable all driver signing for that >> bootup (or permanently, which is a security hole). >> No way, that I know of, to make a permanent >> exception for that driver. > > I dunno what you're talking about. Rumors > prepared me for a struggle, but my stock > version of Windows 7 came with the CH340 > driver already installed by Microsoft, > and it always works. This is the case > for three different machines with three > different copies of Windows Ultimate. > > In fact, it's the Nano with FTDI that > I've had trouble with. They mostly work, > but sometimes not (USB connects, but no > COM port gets assigned). But it's not > bricked, later the same board works again. > > BTW, other Arduino boards with software > USB emulators always work fine for me.
My SolidRun boys over in Israel make some fine gear. Costs more but does more and is far better engineered. They even have a new Braswell line that runs Windows. https://www.solid-run.com/
On Saturday, May 14, 2016 at 3:33:19 PM UTC-4, Winfield Hill wrote:
> > I dunno what you're talking about. Rumors > prepared me for a struggle, but my stock > version of Windows 7 came with the CH340 > driver already installed by Microsoft, > and it always works. This is the case > for three different machines with three > different copies of Windows Ultimate.
Also the case for a machine running Ubuntu. The Nano's I have used have the CH340G usb chip. The first translator I bought for the mini pro had a FTDI chip and did not work. So I made sure the second translator used a CH340 chip.
> > In fact, it's the Nano with FTDI that > I've had trouble with. They mostly work, > but sometimes not (USB connects, but no > COM port gets assigned). But it's not > bricked, later the same board works again. > > BTW, other Arduino boards with software > USB emulators always work fine for me. > > > -- > Thanks, > - Win
On 14 May 2016 12:33:00 -0700, the renowned Winfield Hill
<hill@rowland.harvard.edu> wrote:

>Spehro Pefhany wrote... >> >>> Two comments on the Nano. $3 versions >>> from China work just fine. Nice. >> >> The $2 ones have a USB-serial chip that does not >> have a signed driver (there exists a perfectly >> good driver, but it's not signed). No problem >> for XP, but for Win7 and later ( and MacOS) >> you have disable all driver signing for that >> bootup (or permanently, which is a security hole). >> No way, that I know of, to make a permanent >> exception for that driver. > > I dunno what you're talking about. Rumors > prepared me for a struggle, but my stock > version of Windows 7 came with the CH340 > driver already installed by Microsoft,
Oh, crud! I'm conflating this with another emulator driver I couldn't get to work with Windows 7 without disabling signatures (too many late nights). It definitely had problems with later versions of MacOS without disabling signatures.. can't get it to work on my Macbook pro otherwise. https://tzapu.com/making-ch340-ch341-serial-adapters-work-under-el-capitan-os-x/ And there were problems (I thought) reported at first with Win10 Anyway my apologies, under Win7 it works fine on the two machines I have it on without disabling signatures! You can't beat the functionality and development system for $2 and $0 respectively.
> and it always works. This is the case > for three different machines with three > different copies of Windows Ultimate. > > In fact, it's the Nano with FTDI that > I've had trouble with. They mostly work,
Yes, the FTDI clone issue is well known. I avoid anything that claims to have FTDI (and isn't 100% sure) for that reason.
> but sometimes not (USB connects, but no > COM port gets assigned). But it's not > bricked, later the same board works again. > > BTW, other Arduino boards with software > USB emulators always work fine for me.
-- Best regards, Spehro Pefhany Amazon link for AoE 3rd Edition: http://tinyurl.com/ntrpwu8
Den s&oslash;ndag den 15. maj 2016 kl. 01.15.40 UTC+2 skrev Spehro Pefhany:
> On 14 May 2016 12:33:00 -0700, the renowned Winfield Hill > <hill@rowland.harvard.edu> wrote: > > >Spehro Pefhany wrote... > >> > >>> Two comments on the Nano. $3 versions > >>> from China work just fine. Nice. > >> > >> The $2 ones have a USB-serial chip that does not > >> have a signed driver (there exists a perfectly > >> good driver, but it's not signed). No problem > >> for XP, but for Win7 and later ( and MacOS) > >> you have disable all driver signing for that > >> bootup (or permanently, which is a security hole). > >> No way, that I know of, to make a permanent > >> exception for that driver. > > > > I dunno what you're talking about. Rumors > > prepared me for a struggle, but my stock > > version of Windows 7 came with the CH340 > > driver already installed by Microsoft, > > Oh, crud! I'm conflating this with another emulator driver I couldn't > get to work with Windows 7 without disabling signatures (too many late > nights). It definitely had problems with later versions of MacOS > without disabling signatures.. can't get it to work on my Macbook pro > otherwise. > > https://tzapu.com/making-ch340-ch341-serial-adapters-work-under-el-capitan-os-x/ > > > And there were problems (I thought) reported at first with Win10 > > Anyway my apologies, under Win7 it works fine on the two machines I > have it on without disabling signatures! > > You can't beat the functionality and development system for $2 and $0 > respectively.
the Uno form factor nucleo boards comes debugger at 10$
> > > > and it always works. This is the case > > for three different machines with three > > different copies of Windows Ultimate. > > > > In fact, it's the Nano with FTDI that > > I've had trouble with. They mostly work, > > Yes, the FTDI clone issue is well known. I avoid anything that > claims to have FTDI (and isn't 100% sure) for that reason.
afaict most of the problems comes from FTDI themself trying to fight the clones, which seem a bit like poisoning you food to prevent someone else from stealing it -Lasse