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OT: Science of dropping things

Started by bitrex April 9, 2016
On Mon, 11 Apr 2016 11:56:13 -0800, Robert Baer
<robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote:

>Spehro Pefhany wrote: >> On Sun, 10 Apr 2016 00:22:12 -0500, the renowned "Tim Williams" >> <tiwill@seventransistorlabs.com> wrote: >> >>> "John Larkin"<jjlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote in message >>> news:hccigb9fms4e0atgjv2dotecf7tvkihmvk@4ax.com... >>>> Parts are getting smaller a lot faster than we're getting older. 1206 >>>> resistors used to seem impossibly small. I was soldering some >>>> yesterday and they looked gigantic. Even 0805 looks big. >>> >>> Pfft, 0603 is average, 0402 and below is where things get tiny. >> >> What's amazing to me is how perfect the 0603 and 0402 parts look under >> a microscope, for something that is almost free to buy. >> >> Radiused edges and radiused metalization, smooth ceramic. >> >> My tweezer ends look crude by comparison. >> >>> >>> Not-bragging-bragging about my still young eyes, of course ;-) >>> >>>> I just got a board with 60 mil high reference designators; they are >>>> tiny but beautifully sharp. Yesterday I asked the younger people in >>>> production if they would mind my going to 50 mils. They all said no >>>> problem, we need magnification to see this stuff already. >>> >>> Geez, those are bigger than the components. >>> >>> I've received 25 mil text which was legible, but that's pushing it. I use >>> 30 (6 line width) for most SMTs. 60 (occasionally more) is reserved only >>> for bulky THTs that you're expected to see while plugging things in. >>> >>>> Our senses are limited in dealing with electronics. We need a lot of >>>> fancy and fun instruments. >>> >>> Wouldn't mind a Mantis like you've got, but a loupe is quite handy for >>> inspecting those things my eyes aren't really sharp enough to resolve in the >>> first place. >>> >>> Tim >> > Why doesn't some get an enlarger, put a camera at where the film goes >and use a monitor? > Result: about 10 inches of work space, HUGE part images (after >appropriate adjustment).
It's hard to work looking at a monitor. The Mantis has astonishing brightness and clarity and 3D realism; you can move your head around and see the perspective change, like real life. There's plenty of room to work under it, and the posture is excellent. You don't have to hunch over like with a head-mount magnifier. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc picosecond timing precision measurement jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com http://www.highlandtechnology.com
On 4/9/2016 7:38 AM, Cursitor Doom wrote:
> On Sat, 09 Apr 2016 02:49:03 -0400, bitrex wrote: > >> I'm fairly clumsy, and I drop things on the floor a lot. >> >> What often happens is that I hear something small clatter to the floor, >> like a screw, or key, or cell phone charger. I then think "Ah, this >> should be easy to find." >> >> Then I end up hunting around on my hands and knees with a flashlight for >> that screw I heard fall to the floor...and I never find it. You'd think >> if you heard it hit the ground, it would be easy to find...but dropped >> things apparently just vanish into another dimension. > > It's called an "apport" and is more common than you might think. > Certainly around my workshop it is, anyway. >
Yes... Apport. It's real. A few years ago I was putting together an external harddrive for my sister. It uses a short IDE cable inside the case. Somewhere between my kitchen table and my computer desk, in the next room, the cable disappeared never ever to be seen again. There is no rational explanation of where it went.
On 04/10/2016 11:59 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Sat, 9 Apr 2016 02:49:03 -0400, bitrex > <bitrex@de.lete.earthlink.net> wrote: > >> Then I end up hunting around on my hands and knees with a flashlight for >> that screw I heard fall to the floor...and I never find it. You'd think >> if you heard it hit the ground, it would be easy to find...but dropped >> things apparently just vanish into another dimension. > > Idea: Get a security camera and attach it under your workbench > pointed downward. When you drop something, merely rewind the recorded > video to when you dropped it, and you might be able to see where it > landed. Lighting, depth of field, frame rate, and focus will need to > be determined. It probably won't see chip size parts, but might work > with larger objects like hardware, leaded components, BNC center pins, > etc. >
Wow! :D
On Mon, 11 Apr 2016 15:05:57 -0400, rickman <gnuarm@gmail.com> wrote:

>On 4/10/2016 2:48 PM, Bill Martin wrote: >> Ummm, maybe a good addition to one of those robo-suckers...set it off & >> check in an hour! :-)
>Trouble is they *are't* vacuum cleaners, they are brooms. Small objects >tend to be scattered about as much as swept into the bin.
A Roomba won't work because it takes too much work to fish out the tiny SMT parts from the dust bin. When I use a vacuum cleaner, I put some panty hose over the vacuum hose entry, and suck away over the carpet. The panty hose prevents any small SMT parts from entering the hose and disappearing into the vacuum cleaner bag. I do have to occasionally scrape off the accumulated dust and dirt but small parts are easily visible. However, the vacuum cleaner method does not work with all type of parts. It works great for small and light weight parts, but not with heavier parts, like hardware. Incidentally, the difficult part is asking the lady friend for some used panty hose, or the embarrassment of buying some at the local store. I also managed to ruin my reputation by using panty hose as a sawdust catcher on my motorized miter saw. This may explain why I prefer other methods. -- Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
On Mon, 11 Apr 2016 18:12:56 -0500, gray_wolf wrote:

> Yes... Apport. It's real. A few years ago I was putting together an > external harddrive for my sister. It uses a short IDE cable inside the > case. > > Somewhere between my kitchen table and my computer desk, in the next > room, the cable disappeared never ever to be seen again. There is no > rational explanation of where it went.
Yes, it definitely happens. Some years ago my mother had some other woman's wedding (or engagement; I can't recall now) ring pop into her universe when she was wiping down the kitchen worktop one day. Heard a tinkling sound, looked behind her and there it was on the floor still rocking to and fro! Never happens that way around for me, though. I only ever lose stuff. :( Be fascinating to know what causes it, though.
"Cursitor Doom" <curd@notformail.com> wrote in message 
news:nejb1a$fip$1@dont-email.me...
> On Mon, 11 Apr 2016 18:12:56 -0500, gray_wolf wrote: > >> Yes... Apport. It's real. A few years ago I was putting together an >> external harddrive for my sister. It uses a short IDE cable inside the >> case. >> >> Somewhere between my kitchen table and my computer desk, in the next >> room, the cable disappeared never ever to be seen again. There is no >> rational explanation of where it went. > > Yes, it definitely happens. Some years ago my mother had some other > woman's wedding (or engagement; I can't recall now) ring pop into her > universe when she was wiping down the kitchen worktop one day. Heard a > tinkling sound, looked behind her and there it was on the floor still > rocking to and fro! Never happens that way around for me, though. I only > ever lose stuff. :( > Be fascinating to know what causes it, though.
It seems to be inversely proportional to size. Also known as the SMT effect.
Clifford Heath wrote:
> On 13/04/16 03:24, Cursitor Doom wrote: >> On Mon, 11 Apr 2016 18:12:56 -0500, gray_wolf wrote: >> >>> Yes... Apport. It's real. A few years ago I was putting together an >>> external harddrive for my sister. It uses a short IDE cable inside the >>> case. >>> >>> Somewhere between my kitchen table and my computer desk, in the next >>> room, the cable disappeared never ever to be seen again. There is no >>> rational explanation of where it went. >> >> Yes, it definitely happens. Some years ago my mother had some other >> woman's wedding (or engagement; I can't recall now) ring pop into her >> universe when she was wiping down the kitchen worktop one day. Heard a >> tinkling sound, looked behind her and there it was on the floor still >> rocking to and fro! Never happens that way around for me, though. I only >> ever lose stuff. :( >> Be fascinating to know what causes it, though. > > Something like the same as what happens during the sock wash. > > Perhaps during the spin... a worm-hole between two machines > opens and a sock falls through, creating an odd sock in both > machines, and about half the time, no-one recognises the odd > one. > > This is my theory.
http://www.tv.com/shows/the-ren-and-stimpy-show/black-hole-stimpys-invention-56645/ -- Les Cargill
On 4/12/2016 1:45 PM, tom wrote:
> "Cursitor Doom" <curd@notformail.com> wrote in message > news:nejb1a$fip$1@dont-email.me... >> On Mon, 11 Apr 2016 18:12:56 -0500, gray_wolf wrote: >> >>> Yes... Apport. It's real. A few years ago I was putting together an >>> external harddrive for my sister. It uses a short IDE cable inside the >>> case. >>> >>> Somewhere between my kitchen table and my computer desk, in the next >>> room, the cable disappeared never ever to be seen again. There is no >>> rational explanation of where it went. >> >> Yes, it definitely happens. Some years ago my mother had some other >> woman's wedding (or engagement; I can't recall now) ring pop into her >> universe when she was wiping down the kitchen worktop one day. Heard a >> tinkling sound, looked behind her and there it was on the floor still >> rocking to and fro! Never happens that way around for me, though. I only >> ever lose stuff. :( >> Be fascinating to know what causes it, though. > > It seems to be inversely proportional to size. Also known as the SMT effect.
Isn't this predicted by quantum mechanics? Everything has a small, but finite probability of being somewhere. Maybe we got the probabilities wrong and it's actually a lot more likely... as long as it's not being observed. -- Rick
On 14/04/2016 12:53 PM, Les Cargill wrote:
> Clifford Heath wrote: >> On 13/04/16 03:24, Cursitor Doom wrote: >>> On Mon, 11 Apr 2016 18:12:56 -0500, gray_wolf wrote: >>> >>>> Yes... Apport. It's real. A few years ago I was putting together an >>>> external harddrive for my sister. It uses a short IDE cable inside the >>>> case. >>>> >>>> Somewhere between my kitchen table and my computer desk, in the next >>>> room, the cable disappeared never ever to be seen again. There is no >>>> rational explanation of where it went. >>> >>> Yes, it definitely happens. Some years ago my mother had some other >>> woman's wedding (or engagement; I can't recall now) ring pop into her >>> universe when she was wiping down the kitchen worktop one day. Heard a >>> tinkling sound, looked behind her and there it was on the floor still >>> rocking to and fro! Never happens that way around for me, though. I only >>> ever lose stuff. :( >>> Be fascinating to know what causes it, though. >> >> Something like the same as what happens during the sock wash. >> >> Perhaps during the spin... a worm-hole between two machines >> opens and a sock falls through, creating an odd sock in both >> machines, and about half the time, no-one recognises the odd >> one. >> >> This is my theory. > > > http://www.tv.com/shows/the-ren-and-stimpy-show/black-hole-stimpys-invention-56645/ >
Looney Tunes had it first (1954): http://www.b99.tv/video/hole-idea/ Cheers, Chris.
On Friday, April 8, 2016 at 11:49:10 PM UTC-7, bitrex wrote:

> Then I end up hunting around on my hands and knees with a flashlight for > that screw I heard fall to the floor...and I never find it. You'd think > if you heard it hit the ground, it would be easy to find...but dropped > things apparently just vanish into another dimension.
How about the ARCHIVE OF VANISHING OBJECTS, http://amasci.com/unusual/objs.html Around our shop, the "Vanishing To3 transistor" is legendary. It went "clank" once when dropped in front of a group of three techs, but then it apparently never bounced twice. There was no place for it to hide. We've still never found it. But in that case, nobody was looking directly at it as it fell. I once had a coffee stir-stick wink out of existence while I was in the process of stirring coffee.
> Is there any science about why things you drop on the floor always end > up in the last place you'd look?
The other part of the myth is that they reappear days later, sometimes "falling out of the ceiling." (And the ones which never come back, they must have gone along a Zorth-like axis rather than timelike.) Maybe humans can teleport objects, so when you drop something, your Larry Niven invisible Gil Hamilton arm reaches out and makes a panicked grab, but ends up flicking it forward in spacetime. Several "vanishing object" reports mention that vanished objects later reappear in mid air to continue their original trajectory from when they winked out. Well, maybe flick them pastwards rather than futurewards? But then two objects would exist until you lost the first. So, if someone near you falls, don't try to catch them using psychic powers. Oh, also, Alfred Bester's "The Stars My Destination" is based on something similar: humans teleporting themselves a few feet to escape certain death. ((((((((((((((((((((((( ( ( (o) ) ) ))))))))))))))))))))))) William J. Beaty Research Engineer beaty a chem washington edu UW Chem Dept, Bagley Hall RM74 billb a eskimo com Box 351700, Seattle, WA 98195-1700 ph 3-6195 http://staff.washington.edu/wbeaty/