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Sigma delta audio dacs

Started by bitrex January 7, 2016
bitrex <bitrex@de.lete.earthlink.net> wrote:
> I think my first real PC was around 1991 - it was a 386SX at > 16MHz. It originally came with a meg of RAM, and I installed a > second meg at some point (that really hurt my pockets!) I think > two was the max the mobo supported. I don't think I ever invested > in the FPU coprocessor option. 44 megabyte hard drive. > > It ran Sim Earth, Shuttle Simulator, and Wolfenstein 3D really > well. Sometimes I had to mess with the HIMEM settings and such to > free up enough extended memory for certain programs to > run. > > Unfortunately, I couldn't run Doom, as it needed a minimum of 4 > megs to work. And the 16MHz 386 likely wasn't gutsy enough to run > it at any decent resolution, even though the code was written > with PCs that didn't have FPUs in mind. 386s with more ram and a > 40 Mhz clock can pull it off IIRC. > > The fast inverse sqrt algorithm used in the follow up game to > compute dot products between lighting vectors and surface normals > is pretty cool.
Ok... but I did not want to invest money in a system that would not be able to run a real OS. I already had an Atari ST since 1985 and it was similarly speced like the above, but like a DOS machine it was not really suitable for multitasking, networking, etc. Linux changed all that. Before it would be possible to run XENIX or SCO UNIX on 386/486 hardware, but the OS and tools alone would cost a similar amount to what I spent on the hardware. And Linux was (and is) free.
Rob <nomail@example.com> Wrote in message:
> bitrex <bitrex@de.lete.earthlink.net> wrote: >> I think my first real PC was around 1991 - it was a 386SX at >> 16MHz. It originally came with a meg of RAM, and I installed a >> second meg at some point (that really hurt my pockets!) I think >> two was the max the mobo supported. I don't think I ever invested >> in the FPU coprocessor option. 44 megabyte hard drive. >> >> It ran Sim Earth, Shuttle Simulator, and Wolfenstein 3D really >> well. Sometimes I had to mess with the HIMEM settings and such to >> free up enough extended memory for certain programs to >> run. >> >> Unfortunately, I couldn't run Doom, as it needed a minimum of 4 >> megs to work. And the 16MHz 386 likely wasn't gutsy enough to run >> it at any decent resolution, even though the code was written >> with PCs that didn't have FPUs in mind. 386s with more ram and a >> 40 Mhz clock can pull it off IIRC. >> >> The fast inverse sqrt algorithm used in the follow up game to >> compute dot products between lighting vectors and surface normals >> is pretty cool. > > Ok... but I did not want to invest money in a system that would not be > able to run a real OS. I already had an Atari ST since 1985 and it was > similarly speced like the above, but like a DOS machine it was not > really suitable for multitasking, networking, etc. > > Linux changed all that. Before it would be possible to run XENIX > or SCO UNIX on 386/486 hardware, but the OS and tools alone would cost > a similar amount to what I spent on the hardware. And Linux was (and > is) free. >
Consumer Linux really has come a long way. I have a Celeron netbook - running win 8.1 on it is painful, but Xubuntu flies and is a pleasure. It makes it into like, an actual useful computer. I run Windows 7 on my desktop (actually a rackmount) because there are some audio production applications I need that simply will not run under WINE. That one is a 4 core AMD of some variety. I'd like to dual boot Ubuntu on that one, but the main disk is RAID0 and I've been having a lot of trouble setting up GRUB and the MBR etc. properly to make it work. -- ----Android NewsGroup Reader---- http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
On 01/10/2016 01:14 PM, bitrex wrote:
> Rob <nomail@example.com> Wrote in message: >> bitrex <bitrex@de.lete.earthlink.net> wrote: >>> I think my first real PC was around 1991 - it was a 386SX at >>> 16MHz. It originally came with a meg of RAM, and I installed a >>> second meg at some point (that really hurt my pockets!) I think >>> two was the max the mobo supported. I don't think I ever invested >>> in the FPU coprocessor option. 44 megabyte hard drive. >>> >>> It ran Sim Earth, Shuttle Simulator, and Wolfenstein 3D really >>> well. Sometimes I had to mess with the HIMEM settings and such to >>> free up enough extended memory for certain programs to >>> run. >>> >>> Unfortunately, I couldn't run Doom, as it needed a minimum of 4 >>> megs to work. And the 16MHz 386 likely wasn't gutsy enough to run >>> it at any decent resolution, even though the code was written >>> with PCs that didn't have FPUs in mind. 386s with more ram and a >>> 40 Mhz clock can pull it off IIRC. >>> >>> The fast inverse sqrt algorithm used in the follow up game to >>> compute dot products between lighting vectors and surface normals >>> is pretty cool. >> >> Ok... but I did not want to invest money in a system that would not be >> able to run a real OS. I already had an Atari ST since 1985 and it was >> similarly speced like the above, but like a DOS machine it was not >> really suitable for multitasking, networking, etc. >> >> Linux changed all that. Before it would be possible to run XENIX >> or SCO UNIX on 386/486 hardware, but the OS and tools alone would cost >> a similar amount to what I spent on the hardware. And Linux was (and >> is) free. >> > > Consumer Linux really has come a long way. I have a Celeron > netbook - running win 8.1 on it is painful, but Xubuntu flies and > is a pleasure. It makes it into like, an actual useful > computer. > > I run Windows 7 on my desktop (actually a rackmount) because there > are some audio production applications I need that simply will > not run under WINE. That one is a 4 core AMD of some variety. > > > I'd like to dual boot Ubuntu on that one, but the main disk is > RAID0 and I've been having a lot of trouble setting up GRUB and > the MBR etc. properly to make it work. >
Given our current environment, I commend to your attention the Qubes OS, http://qubes-os.org. Nation-state capabilities such as firmware attacks on USB and hard drives have leaked into the criminal sector, so you don't have to be a dissident/whistleblower/traitor/criminal to need that sort of protection. Cheers Phil Hobbs
Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> Wrote in message:
> On 01/10/2016 01:14 PM, bitrex wrote: >> Rob <nomail@example.com> Wrote in message: >>> bitrex <bitrex@de.lete.earthlink.net> wrote: >>>> I think my first real PC was around 1991 - it was a 386SX at >>>> 16MHz. It originally came with a meg of RAM, and I installed a >>>> second meg at some point (that really hurt my pockets!) I think >>>> two was the max the mobo supported. I don't think I ever invested >>>> in the FPU coprocessor option. 44 megabyte hard drive. >>>> >>>> It ran Sim Earth, Shuttle Simulator, and Wolfenstein 3D really >>>> well. Sometimes I had to mess with the HIMEM settings and such to >>>> free up enough extended memory for certain programs to >>>> run. >>>> >>>> Unfortunately, I couldn't run Doom, as it needed a minimum of 4 >>>> megs to work. And the 16MHz 386 likely wasn't gutsy enough to run >>>> it at any decent resolution, even though the code was written >>>> with PCs that didn't have FPUs in mind. 386s with more ram and a >>>> 40 Mhz clock can pull it off IIRC. >>>> >>>> The fast inverse sqrt algorithm used in the follow up game to >>>> compute dot products between lighting vectors and surface normals >>>> is pretty cool. >>> >>> Ok... but I did not want to invest money in a system that would not be >>> able to run a real OS. I already had an Atari ST since 1985 and it was >>> similarly speced like the above, but like a DOS machine it was not >>> really suitable for multitasking, networking, etc. >>> >>> Linux changed all that. Before it would be possible to run XENIX >>> or SCO UNIX on 386/486 hardware, but the OS and tools alone would cost >>> a similar amount to what I spent on the hardware. And Linux was (and >>> is) free. >>> >> >> Consumer Linux really has come a long way. I have a Celeron >> netbook - running win 8.1 on it is painful, but Xubuntu flies and >> is a pleasure. It makes it into like, an actual useful >> computer. >> >> I run Windows 7 on my desktop (actually a rackmount) because there >> are some audio production applications I need that simply will >> not run under WINE. That one is a 4 core AMD of some variety. >> >> >> I'd like to dual boot Ubuntu on that one, but the main disk is >> RAID0 and I've been having a lot of trouble setting up GRUB and >> the MBR etc. properly to make it work. >> > > Given our current environment, I commend to your attention the Qubes OS, > http://qubes-os.org. Nation-state capabilities such as firmware attacks > on USB and hard drives have leaked into the criminal sector, so you > don't have to be a dissident/whistleblower/traitor/criminal to need that > sort of protection. > > Cheers > > Phil Hobbs >
You don't have to be a dissident, but it sure helps. -- ----Android NewsGroup Reader---- http://usenet.sinaapp.com/