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Rudimentary PC USB oscilloscope?

Started by John Doe September 2, 2015
My main question is about PC USB-based oscilloscopes. The rest of this is 
specific to my problem(s) and may be overlooked.

I'm using cordless drills to power electric bicycles. I have one built. It 
works but is underpowered. I am building a better one using a DeWalt 
DCD995. Some nice electronics included in that drill, a stout (very tight 
turning) brushless motor with a controller. 

It has a few inputs from the speed switch and clutch. 

It has 5 data/signal outputs from the controller to the motor. One wire is 
purple, the other four wires are black.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/659/21083853371_334b03da77_b.jpg

It also has three heavy-duty wires going to the motor. I've been told that 
the drill uses AC, so maybe that's what the extra power wire is for, I 
dunno. 

I desperately need to disable some of the motor's functions, so I need to 
know what the various wires do. Since it's probably a DeWalt specific 
motor, looking for data would be a waste of time?

The three heavy-duty wires... Do you guess they control any of the 
functions or are they simply for supplying power?

Thanks.
Den torsdag den 3. september 2015 kl. 00.30.18 UTC+2 skrev John Doe:
> My main question is about PC USB-based oscilloscopes. The rest of this is > specific to my problem(s) and may be overlooked. > > I'm using cordless drills to power electric bicycles. I have one built. It > works but is underpowered. I am building a better one using a DeWalt > DCD995. Some nice electronics included in that drill, a stout (very tight > turning) brushless motor with a controller. > > It has a few inputs from the speed switch and clutch. > > It has 5 data/signal outputs from the controller to the motor. One wire is > purple, the other four wires are black. > > https://farm1.staticflickr.com/659/21083853371_334b03da77_b.jpg > > It also has three heavy-duty wires going to the motor. I've been told that > the drill uses AC, so maybe that's what the extra power wire is for, I > dunno. > > I desperately need to disable some of the motor's functions, so I need to > know what the various wires do. Since it's probably a DeWalt specific > motor, looking for data would be a waste of time? > > The three heavy-duty wires... Do you guess they control any of the > functions or are they simply for supplying power? > > Thanks.
The brush-less motor is a three phase that's why it has three wires The other wires are probably for hall sensors to detect the motor position for the micro controller that runs the motor driver there is really nothing much you can do with it -Lasse
Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote: 

> skrev John Doe:
>> My main question is about PC USB-based oscilloscopes. The rest of >> this is specific to my problem(s) and may be overlooked. >> >> I'm using cordless drills to power electric bicycles. I have one >> built. It works but is underpowered. I am building a better one using >> a DeWalt DCD995. Some nice electronics included in that drill, a >> stout (very tight turning) brushless motor with a controller. >> >> It has a few inputs from the speed switch and clutch. >> >> It has 5 data/signal outputs from the controller to the motor. One >> wire is purple, the other four wires are black. >> >> https://farm1.staticflickr.com/659/21083853371_334b03da77_b.jpg >> >> It also has three heavy-duty wires going to the motor. I've been told >> that the drill uses AC, so maybe that's what the extra power wire is >> for, I dunno. >> >> I desperately need to disable some of the motor's functions, so I >> need to know what the various wires do. Since it's probably a DeWalt >> specific motor, looking for data would be a waste of time? >> >> The three heavy-duty wires... Do you guess they control any of the >> functions or are they simply for supplying power?
> The brush-less motor is a three phase that's why it has three wires
That's how the controller controls the motor? Not with the signal wires?
> The other wires are probably for hall sensors to detect the motor > position for the micro controller that runs the motor driver
That's not done inside the motor?
> > there is really nothing much you can do with it > > > -Lasse >
Den torsdag den 3. september 2015 kl. 01.21.23 UTC+2 skrev John Doe:
> Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote: > > > skrev John Doe: > > >> My main question is about PC USB-based oscilloscopes. The rest of > >> this is specific to my problem(s) and may be overlooked. > >> > >> I'm using cordless drills to power electric bicycles. I have one > >> built. It works but is underpowered. I am building a better one using > >> a DeWalt DCD995. Some nice electronics included in that drill, a > >> stout (very tight turning) brushless motor with a controller. > >> > >> It has a few inputs from the speed switch and clutch. > >> > >> It has 5 data/signal outputs from the controller to the motor. One > >> wire is purple, the other four wires are black. > >> > >> https://farm1.staticflickr.com/659/21083853371_334b03da77_b.jpg > >> > >> It also has three heavy-duty wires going to the motor. I've been told > >> that the drill uses AC, so maybe that's what the extra power wire is > >> for, I dunno. > >> > >> I desperately need to disable some of the motor's functions, so I > >> need to know what the various wires do. Since it's probably a DeWalt > >> specific motor, looking for data would be a waste of time? > >> > >> The three heavy-duty wires... Do you guess they control any of the > >> functions or are they simply for supplying power? > > > The brush-less motor is a three phase that's why it has three wires > > That's how the controller controls the motor? Not with the signal wires?
the signal wires tell the controller where the rotor in side the motor is and the controller drives the three "power" wires accordingly https://www.jrmagnetics.com/mtrctrl/pid/sixstep.png
> > > The other wires are probably for hall sensors to detect the motor > > position for the micro controller that runs the motor driver > > That's not done inside the motor?
the motor is just coils magnets and sensors to sense position the stuff inside that potted controller is basically an electronic version of commutator and brushes, with a few more bells and whistles -Lasse
Thanks to the replies.

FWIW...
My interest in this might be waning even though I already bought one DCD995 
impact driver and dissected it, besides making one electric bike already. 
Now I'm thinking an impact wrench instead. Apparently impact wrenches are 
meant for torque in the reverse direction. That should mean they can be 
efficiently placed on the left side of the bicycle bottom bracket, opposite 
the sprocket. And of course disabling the impact function. DeWalt sells 
variable speed models geared even lower than my DCD995.
On Wednesday, September 2, 2015 at 11:54:19 PM UTC-4, John Doe wrote:
> Thanks to the replies. > > FWIW... > My interest in this might be waning even though I already bought one DCD995 > impact driver and dissected it, besides making one electric bike already. > Now I'm thinking an impact wrench instead. Apparently impact wrenches are > meant for torque in the reverse direction. That should mean they can be > efficiently placed on the left side of the bicycle bottom bracket, opposite > the sprocket. And of course disabling the impact function. DeWalt sells > variable speed models geared even lower than my DCD995.
It would be a lot easier to use an ordinary d.c. brush motor, then control the speed with pulse-width modulation. 150w - 800w scooter motors of that kind are all over eBay & surplus market, pretty cheap. HTH, James Arthur
On Wed, 2 Sep 2015 22:28:23 +0000 (UTC), John Doe
<always.look@message.header> Gave us:

>My main question is about PC USB-based oscilloscopes. The rest of this is >specific to my problem(s) and may be overlooked. > >I'm using cordless drills to power electric bicycles. I have one built. It >works but is underpowered. I am building a better one using a DeWalt >DCD995. Some nice electronics included in that drill, a stout (very tight >turning) brushless motor with a controller. > >It has a few inputs from the speed switch and clutch. > >It has 5 data/signal outputs from the controller to the motor. One wire is >purple, the other four wires are black. > >https://farm1.staticflickr.com/659/21083853371_334b03da77_b.jpg > >It also has three heavy-duty wires going to the motor. I've been told that >the drill uses AC, so maybe that's what the extra power wire is for, I >dunno. > >I desperately need to disable some of the motor's functions, so I need to >know what the various wires do. Since it's probably a DeWalt specific >motor, looking for data would be a waste of time? > >The three heavy-duty wires... Do you guess they control any of the >functions or are they simply for supplying power? > >Thanks.
Here.... http://www.amazon.com/Razor-250w-Electric-Motor-E200/dp/B007EMRCVM Look at the rest of the page too. There are even controllers. Think "slot cars" for a mindset.
On Thu, 03 Sep 2015 02:07:27 -0400, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno
<DLU1@DecadentLinuxUser.org> Gave us:

>On Wed, 2 Sep 2015 22:28:23 +0000 (UTC), John Doe ><always.look@message.header> Gave us: > >>My main question is about PC USB-based oscilloscopes. The rest of this is >>specific to my problem(s) and may be overlooked. >> >>I'm using cordless drills to power electric bicycles.
snip
> > Here.... > >http://www.amazon.com/Razor-250w-Electric-Motor-E200/dp/B007EMRCVM > > Look at the rest of the page too. There are even controllers. > > Think "slot cars" for a mindset.
http://www.amazon.com/Electric-Bicycle-Conversion-Motor-Wheel/dp/B00OZ0C7VQ
dagmargoodboat@yahoo.com wrote: 

> John Doe wrote:
>> Thanks to the [interesting] replies.
I hobbied in electronics for a while, I'll always miss the power.
>> FWIW... My interest in this might be waning even though I already >> bought one DCD995 impact driver and dissected it, besides making one >> electric bike already. Now I'm thinking an impact wrench instead. >> Apparently impact wrenches are meant for torque in the reverse >> direction. That should mean they can be efficiently placed on the >> left side of the bicycle bottom bracket, opposite the sprocket. And >> of course disabling the impact function. DeWalt sells variable speed >> models geared even lower than my DCD995. > > It would be a lot easier to use an ordinary d.c. brush motor, then > control the speed with pulse-width modulation. > > 150w - 800w scooter motors of that kind are all over eBay & surplus > market, pretty cheap.
Yeah it's easy just talking about building an electric bike. But when you go to actually build it, things get hairy. Unbelievably hairy. You wouldn't believe how difficult actually building stuff can be. For example... In the motor you pointed to in another post, the sprocket is not going to work with a bicycle chain. And Yes, I know you can say but this and but that, but talking about it isn't the same as building it. Let's see your electric bike... I just ordered a DeWalt DCF899. It's a massive impact wrench. It should make building this thing much less difficult than any other way. And super power. And other things. Time will tell. -- I'm not going to reply to three different posts, so I put it all here.
Nevermind that. The posts were so close, I mistook them for the same 
author. But it more or less applies anyway.