Forums

red laser use & safety

Started by unk August 30, 2015
There is a type of bike light gizmo than uses a laser to draw a line 
(actually two, two lines) on the road surface behind the bicycle.

How safe is this to look directly at?  
On Sun, 30 Aug 2015 11:40:53 +0000 (UTC), unk <me@privacy.net> wrote:

>There is a type of bike light gizmo than uses a laser to draw a line >(actually two, two lines) on the road surface behind the bicycle. > >How safe is this to look directly at?
You could use something like the disks used to draw cut lines for miter saws, one mounted on each side of the rear wheel. The rotation would draw the lines and make it eye-safe. A shield could be used to keep the light where you want it. These use a centrifugal switch to turn them off when not in use (and keep it eye-safe, as well). http://www.familyhandyman.com/tools/miter-saws/retrofit-a-miter-saw-with-a-laser/view-all
On Sun, 30 Aug 2015 09:44:10 -0400, krw <krw@nowhere.com> Gave us:

>On Sun, 30 Aug 2015 11:40:53 +0000 (UTC), unk <me@privacy.net> wrote: > >>There is a type of bike light gizmo than uses a laser to draw a line >>(actually two, two lines) on the road surface behind the bicycle. >> >>How safe is this to look directly at? > >You could use something like the disks used to draw cut lines for >miter saws, one mounted on each side of the rear wheel. The rotation >would draw the lines and make it eye-safe. A shield could be used to >keep the light where you want it. These use a centrifugal switch to >turn them off when not in use (and keep it eye-safe, as well). > >http://www.familyhandyman.com/tools/miter-saws/retrofit-a-miter-saw-with-a-laser/view-all
They make tail lights for bikes that strike two parallel lines down on the ground about ten feet long with no moving parts. https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=bike+light+line+drawing+laser
On Sunday, August 30, 2015 at 4:42:44 AM UTC-7, unk wrote:
> There is a type of bike light gizmo than uses a laser to draw a line > (actually two, two lines) on the road surface behind the bicycle. > > How safe is this to look directly at?
If sold in the US the product and packaging will have a label advising you not to look directly into the beams if there was ever any suspicion the beams could harm anyone or anything. Sometimes they go overboard but for these devices, I'd say such a label is appropriate. I would never use such a device. First, it seems obnoxious to me to carry one's own personal pretend bike lane around. More important is the practical risk of highly reflective road debris (or water) that could put the beam into the eye of a driver approaching the bike from the rear, making the car-bike interaction even more dangerous than usual. Mark L. Fergerson
On Sun, 30 Aug 2015 11:40:53 +0000 (UTC), unk <me@privacy.net> Gave us:

>There is a type of bike light gizmo than uses a laser to draw a line >(actually two, two lines) on the road surface behind the bicycle. > >How safe is this to look directly at?
Since you are not supposed to "look directly at" ANY laser light emissions, I would say that you need to draw your own conclusions, however that task may also be over your head.
On Tuesday, September 1, 2015 at 9:46:25 AM UTC-4, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno wrote:
> On Sun, 30 Aug 2015 11:40:53 +0000 (UTC), unk <me@privacy.net> Gave us: > > >There is a type of bike light gizmo than uses a laser to draw a line > >(actually two, two lines) on the road surface behind the bicycle. > > > >How safe is this to look directly at? > > Since you are not supposed to "look directly at" ANY laser light > emissions, I would say that you need to draw your own conclusions, > however that task may also be over your head.
Nah, laser light is just like other light. Too much will cook your eye, or fry your optic nerve. About 1 mW into the eye is the "standard" type number, (for visible lasers, where your blink reflex kicks in.) That's about the same amount of light you get from starring at the sun. (Which can also damage your eye if prolonged.) None visible light is more dangerous. George H.
On Tuesday, September 1, 2015 at 11:26:35 AM UTC-4, George Herold wrote:
> On Tuesday, September 1, 2015 at 9:46:25 AM UTC-4, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno wrote: > > On Sun, 30 Aug 2015 11:40:53 +0000 (UTC), unk <me@privacy.net> Gave us: > > > > >There is a type of bike light gizmo than uses a laser to draw a line > > >(actually two, two lines) on the road surface behind the bicycle. > > > > > >How safe is this to look directly at? > > > > Since you are not supposed to "look directly at" ANY laser light > > emissions, I would say that you need to draw your own conclusions, > > however that task may also be over your head. > > Nah, laser light is just like other light. Too much will cook your eye, > or fry your optic nerve. About 1 mW into the eye is the "standard" type > number, (for visible lasers, where your blink reflex kicks in.) That's about the > same amount of light you get from starring at the sun. (Which can also > damage your eye if prolonged.) None visible light is more dangerous.
^^^ oops Non-visible
> > George H.
On Tue, 1 Sep 2015 08:26:30 -0700 (PDT), George Herold
<gherold@teachspin.com> Gave us:

>On Tuesday, September 1, 2015 at 9:46:25 AM UTC-4, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno wrote: >> On Sun, 30 Aug 2015 11:40:53 +0000 (UTC), unk <me@privacy.net> Gave us: >> >> >There is a type of bike light gizmo than uses a laser to draw a line >> >(actually two, two lines) on the road surface behind the bicycle. >> > >> >How safe is this to look directly at? >> >> Since you are not supposed to "look directly at" ANY laser light >> emissions, I would say that you need to draw your own conclusions, >> however that task may also be over your head. > >Nah, laser light is just like other light. Too much will cook your eye, >or fry your optic nerve. About 1 mW into the eye is the "standard" type >number, (for visible lasers, where your blink reflex kicks in.) That's about the >same amount of light you get from starring at the sun. (Which can also >damage your eye if prolonged.) None visible light is more dangerous. > >George H.
You are the same kind of idiot who goes around declaring that ESD is not a hazard.
On Wednesday, September 2, 2015 at 8:27:37 AM UTC-4, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno wrote:
> On Tue, 1 Sep 2015 08:26:30 -0700 (PDT), George Herold > <gherold@teachspin.com> Gave us: > > >On Tuesday, September 1, 2015 at 9:46:25 AM UTC-4, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno wrote: > >> On Sun, 30 Aug 2015 11:40:53 +0000 (UTC), unk <me@privacy.net> Gave us: > >> > >> >There is a type of bike light gizmo than uses a laser to draw a line > >> >(actually two, two lines) on the road surface behind the bicycle. > >> > > >> >How safe is this to look directly at? > >> > >> Since you are not supposed to "look directly at" ANY laser light > >> emissions, I would say that you need to draw your own conclusions, > >> however that task may also be over your head. > > > >Nah, laser light is just like other light. Too much will cook your eye, > >or fry your optic nerve. About 1 mW into the eye is the "standard" type > >number, (for visible lasers, where your blink reflex kicks in.) That's about the > >same amount of light you get from starring at the sun. (Which can also > >damage your eye if prolonged.) None visible light is more dangerous. > > > >George H. > > You are the same kind of idiot who goes around declaring that ESD is > not a hazard.
I'm hesitant to respond, but how is that even related? ESD and diode lasers (which is at least related to lasers) is a huge issue! I had to flip around the current source for our diode laser driver to keep the case at ground.. and added a boat load of ESD protection diodes. I used a piezo-sparker from a butane lighter to test it... The best monitor turned out to be a photodiode looking at the diode laser output. George H.
On 9/2/2015 9:05 AM, George Herold wrote:
> On Wednesday, September 2, 2015 at 8:27:37 AM UTC-4, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno wrote: >> On Tue, 1 Sep 2015 08:26:30 -0700 (PDT), George Herold >> <gherold@teachspin.com> Gave us: >> >>> On Tuesday, September 1, 2015 at 9:46:25 AM UTC-4, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno wrote: >>>> On Sun, 30 Aug 2015 11:40:53 +0000 (UTC), unk <me@privacy.net> Gave us: >>>> >>>>> There is a type of bike light gizmo than uses a laser to draw a line >>>>> (actually two, two lines) on the road surface behind the bicycle. >>>>> >>>>> How safe is this to look directly at? >>>> >>>> Since you are not supposed to "look directly at" ANY laser light >>>> emissions, I would say that you need to draw your own conclusions, >>>> however that task may also be over your head. >>> >>> Nah, laser light is just like other light. Too much will cook your eye, >>> or fry your optic nerve. About 1 mW into the eye is the "standard" type >>> number, (for visible lasers, where your blink reflex kicks in.) That's about the >>> same amount of light you get from starring at the sun. (Which can also >>> damage your eye if prolonged.) None visible light is more dangerous. >>> >>> George H. >> >> You are the same kind of idiot who goes around declaring that ESD is >> not a hazard. > > I'm hesitant to respond, but how is that even related? > > ESD and diode lasers (which is at least related to lasers) is a huge > issue! I had to flip around the current source for our > diode laser driver to keep the case at ground.. and added a > boat load of ESD protection diodes. I used a piezo-sparker from > a butane lighter to test it... The best monitor turned out to > be a photodiode looking at the diode laser output. > > George H. >
The issue with laser light vs sunlight is the size of the retinal patch that gets illuminated. They eye is very good at focusing a collimated beam down to a small spot, which maximizes retinal damage. Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 hobbs at electrooptical dot net http://electrooptical.net