Forums

Eternal Electricity

Started by Unknown August 26, 2015
Would this work?

I got this idea when one of my solar charged sidewalk lights ran out of
power after a cloudy day. Normally that light lasts all night.

I held a flashlight up to the solar cell charger panel, for a minute,
and after turning off the flashlight, that solar light lit up for about
a minute. 

So, lets say I take a LED flashlight, fill it with (fully charged)
rechargable batteries, and connect wires from a solar cell charger to
those batteries. Then I shine the flashlight directly into the solar
cell, and shield it so no light escapes. 

That way, no light escapes, so ALL the light is used to recharge the
batteries. Therefore, all energy that is used to light the LEDs in the
flashlight is being converted back into electricity. Thus an endless
cycle where the same energy is used over and over for eternity (or until
the batteries die).

While there would be no usefullness to this gadget, since it would not
produce any usable light, would it not become an endless source of
electrical energy?

On 26/08/2015 10:43, boomer#6877250@none.com wrote:
> Would this work? > > I got this idea when one of my solar charged sidewalk lights ran out of > power after a cloudy day. Normally that light lasts all night. > > I held a flashlight up to the solar cell charger panel, for a minute, > and after turning off the flashlight, that solar light lit up for about > a minute. > > So, lets say I take a LED flashlight, fill it with (fully charged) > rechargable batteries, and connect wires from a solar cell charger to > those batteries. Then I shine the flashlight directly into the solar > cell, and shield it so no light escapes. > > That way, no light escapes, so ALL the light is used to recharge the > batteries. Therefore, all energy that is used to light the LEDs in the > flashlight is being converted back into electricity. Thus an endless > cycle where the same energy is used over and over for eternity (or until > the batteries die). > > While there would be no usefullness to this gadget, since it would not > produce any usable light, would it not become an endless source of > electrical energy? >
I think you should try to patent this as quickly as possible ;) piglet
On 26/08/2015 11:13, piglet wrote:
> On 26/08/2015 10:43, boomer#6877250@none.com wrote: >> Would this work? >> >> I got this idea when one of my solar charged sidewalk lights ran out of >> power after a cloudy day. Normally that light lasts all night. >> >> I held a flashlight up to the solar cell charger panel, for a minute, >> and after turning off the flashlight, that solar light lit up for about >> a minute. >> >> So, lets say I take a LED flashlight, fill it with (fully charged) >> rechargable batteries, and connect wires from a solar cell charger to >> those batteries. Then I shine the flashlight directly into the solar >> cell, and shield it so no light escapes. >> >> That way, no light escapes, so ALL the light is used to recharge the >> batteries. Therefore, all energy that is used to light the LEDs in the >> flashlight is being converted back into electricity. Thus an endless >> cycle where the same energy is used over and over for eternity (or until >> the batteries die). >> >> While there would be no usefullness to this gadget, since it would not >> produce any usable light, would it not become an endless source of >> electrical energy? >> > > I think you should try to patent this as quickly as possible ;)
I thought that even USPTO have finally wised up and stopped accepting applications for free energy and perpetual motion machines. The OP would do well to note that PV panels are typically 10% efficient and single junctions max out at about 35% and that even the best multi layer research grade samples can barely manage 45% in white light eg http://www.nrel.gov/news/features/feature_detail.cfm/feature_id=2055 -- Regards, Martin Brown
On Wednesday, 26 August 2015 11:23:30 UTC+1, Martin Brown  wrote:
> On 26/08/2015 11:13, piglet wrote: > > On 26/08/2015 10:43, boomer#6877250@none.com wrote: > >> Would this work? > >> > >> I got this idea when one of my solar charged sidewalk lights ran out of > >> power after a cloudy day. Normally that light lasts all night. > >> > >> I held a flashlight up to the solar cell charger panel, for a minute, > >> and after turning off the flashlight, that solar light lit up for about > >> a minute. > >> > >> So, lets say I take a LED flashlight, fill it with (fully charged) > >> rechargable batteries, and connect wires from a solar cell charger to > >> those batteries. Then I shine the flashlight directly into the solar > >> cell, and shield it so no light escapes. > >> > >> That way, no light escapes, so ALL the light is used to recharge the > >> batteries. Therefore, all energy that is used to light the LEDs in the > >> flashlight is being converted back into electricity. Thus an endless > >> cycle where the same energy is used over and over for eternity (or until > >> the batteries die). > >> > >> While there would be no usefullness to this gadget, since it would not > >> produce any usable light, would it not become an endless source of > >> electrical energy? > >> > > > > I think you should try to patent this as quickly as possible ;) > > I thought that even USPTO have finally wised up and stopped accepting > applications for free energy and perpetual motion machines. > > The OP would do well to note that PV panels are typically 10% efficient > and single junctions max out at about 35% and that even the best multi > layer research grade samples can barely manage 45% in white light eg > > http://www.nrel.gov/news/features/feature_detail.cfm/feature_id=2055
lightbulbs are also inefficient NT
On Wed, 26 Aug 2015 04:43:21 -0500, boomer#6877250@none.com wrote:

>Would this work? > >I got this idea when one of my solar charged sidewalk lights ran out of >power after a cloudy day. Normally that light lasts all night. > >I held a flashlight up to the solar cell charger panel, for a minute, >and after turning off the flashlight, that solar light lit up for about >a minute. > >So, lets say I take a LED flashlight, fill it with (fully charged) >rechargable batteries, and connect wires from a solar cell charger to >those batteries. Then I shine the flashlight directly into the solar >cell, and shield it so no light escapes. > >That way, no light escapes, so ALL the light is used to recharge the >batteries. Therefore, all energy that is used to light the LEDs in the >flashlight is being converted back into electricity. Thus an endless >cycle where the same energy is used over and over for eternity (or until >the batteries die). > >While there would be no usefullness to this gadget, since it would not >produce any usable light, would it not become an endless source of >electrical energy?
--- No. Even if the LEDs and PV cells were 100% efficient, there's resistance in the circuit, so the heat generated by moving the electrons around will eventually leave the system and drain the battery. http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/work.html John Fields
On Wed, 26 Aug 2015 04:43:21 -0500, boomer#6877250@none.com wrote:

>Would this work? > >I got this idea when one of my solar charged sidewalk lights ran out of >power after a cloudy day. Normally that light lasts all night. > >I held a flashlight up to the solar cell charger panel, for a minute, >and after turning off the flashlight, that solar light lit up for about >a minute. > >So, lets say I take a LED flashlight, fill it with (fully charged) >rechargable batteries, and connect wires from a solar cell charger to >those batteries. Then I shine the flashlight directly into the solar >cell, and shield it so no light escapes. > >That way, no light escapes, so ALL the light is used to recharge the >batteries. Therefore, all energy that is used to light the LEDs in the >flashlight is being converted back into electricity. Thus an endless >cycle where the same energy is used over and over for eternity (or until >the batteries die). > >While there would be no usefullness to this gadget, since it would not >produce any usable light, would it not become an endless source of >electrical energy?
You're being mislead by the coincidence of exposure~=delivery time of your single experience. You could disillusion yourself quite simply by extending or repeating the same experiment a number of times, but it might be quicker just to read up on your garden light (and its components). Using only this type of emitter and collector of light, you should be able to see that any innitial energy stored up by one collector's battery will be rapidly lost in the emissive transfer to another identical collector, and the continual repeated exchange between the two. The apparent equality of exposure and emission times in the one initial instance could be explained solely by the garden light's crude operating hysterisis, reacting to temporary stimulus of its ambient light detector. RL
On Wed, 26 Aug 2015 06:10:00 -0500, John Fields
<jfields@austininstruments.com> Gave us:

>On Wed, 26 Aug 2015 04:43:21 -0500, boomer#6877250@none.com wrote: > >>Would this work? >> >>I got this idea when one of my solar charged sidewalk lights ran out of >>power after a cloudy day. Normally that light lasts all night. >> >>I held a flashlight up to the solar cell charger panel, for a minute, >>and after turning off the flashlight, that solar light lit up for about >>a minute. >> >>So, lets say I take a LED flashlight, fill it with (fully charged) >>rechargable batteries, and connect wires from a solar cell charger to >>those batteries. Then I shine the flashlight directly into the solar >>cell, and shield it so no light escapes. >> >>That way, no light escapes, so ALL the light is used to recharge the >>batteries. Therefore, all energy that is used to light the LEDs in the >>flashlight is being converted back into electricity. Thus an endless >>cycle where the same energy is used over and over for eternity (or until >>the batteries die). >> >>While there would be no usefullness to this gadget, since it would not >>produce any usable light, would it not become an endless source of >>electrical energy? > >--- >No. > >Even if the LEDs and PV cells were 100% efficient, there's resistance >in the circuit, so the heat generated by moving the electrons around >will eventually leave the system and drain the battery. > >http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/work.html > >John Fields
Damn! No "sumthin' fer nuthin'? Shucks!
On Wednesday, August 26, 2015 at 5:44:37 AM UTC-4, boomer#...@none.com wrote:
> Would this work? >
Yes, but only in Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas and parts of Florida.
On Wed, 26 Aug 2015 04:43:21 -0500, boomer#6877250 wrote:

> Would this work? > > I got this idea when one of my solar charged sidewalk lights ran out of > power after a cloudy day. Normally that light lasts all night. > > I held a flashlight up to the solar cell charger panel, for a minute, > and after turning off the flashlight, that solar light lit up for about > a minute. > > So, lets say I take a LED flashlight, fill it with (fully charged) > rechargable batteries, and connect wires from a solar cell charger to > those batteries. Then I shine the flashlight directly into the solar > cell, and shield it so no light escapes. > > That way, no light escapes, so ALL the light is used to recharge the > batteries. Therefore, all energy that is used to light the LEDs in the > flashlight is being converted back into electricity. Thus an endless > cycle where the same energy is used over and over for eternity (or until > the batteries die). > > While there would be no usefullness to this gadget, since it would not > produce any usable light, would it not become an endless source of > electrical energy?
Please review the laws of thermodynamics, and get back to us. Here's the summary: 1: you can't win. 2: you can't even get ahead. 3: you can't get out of the game. -- Tim Wescott Wescott Design Services http://www.wescottdesign.com
"Tim Wescott" <seemywebsite@myfooter.really> wrote in message 
news:SOGdnfqPxa0AeUDInZ2dnUVZ5sGdnZ2d@giganews.com...
> On Wed, 26 Aug 2015 04:43:21 -0500, boomer#6877250 wrote: > >> Would this work? >> >> I got this idea when one of my solar charged sidewalk lights ran out of >> power after a cloudy day. Normally that light lasts all night. >> >> I held a flashlight up to the solar cell charger panel, for a minute, >> and after turning off the flashlight, that solar light lit up for about >> a minute. >> >> So, lets say I take a LED flashlight, fill it with (fully charged) >> rechargable batteries, and connect wires from a solar cell charger to >> those batteries. Then I shine the flashlight directly into the solar >> cell, and shield it so no light escapes. >> >> That way, no light escapes, so ALL the light is used to recharge the >> batteries. Therefore, all energy that is used to light the LEDs in the >> flashlight is being converted back into electricity. Thus an endless >> cycle where the same energy is used over and over for eternity (or until >> the batteries die). >> >> While there would be no usefullness to this gadget, since it would not >> produce any usable light, would it not become an endless source of >> electrical energy? > > Please review the laws of thermodynamics, and get back to us. > > Here's the summary: > > 1: you can't win. > > 2: you can't even get ahead. > > 3: you can't get out of the game. > > -- > > Tim Wescott > Wescott Design Services > http://www.wescottdesign.com
Then go start a "go-fund-me" project and become very rich. Obozo will help.