Forums

LCD cleaning

Started by Don Y August 15, 2015
On 8/16/2015 6:39 PM, Don Y wrote:
> On 8/16/2015 4:22 PM, Spehro Pefhany wrote: >> On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 15:14:01 -0700, the renowned Don Y >> <this@is.not.me.com> wrote: >> >>> >>> I was asking for a friend -- who's not keen on having to mix up an >>> alcohol+water "mister". >>> >>> Note that many people don't use their displays as "view only" devices. >>> Some have a habit of pointing to things *on* the screen (thus oils >>> from hands). I've also seen *pen* marks on screens (d'uh... whatever >>> you've underlined won't be there, later!). >> >> And white-out if you have to deal with blondes. ;-) Seriously, people >> pointing at stuff on my screen and touching the screen **right where I >> have to look** with their greasy oily little fingers is a pet hate. > > Exactly. Use the mouse. There is a reason that they *call* it a > POINTING DEVICE!! > > Touchscreen in the car is another annoyance. Perpetually trying to > clean fingerprints off it (which make it harder to read in certain > light).
Same with my iPhone. The touch screen gets dirty with fingerprints (always) and with food (occasionally).
On Mon, 17 Aug 2015 10:24:11 -0500, John S <Sophi.2@invalid.org>
wrote:

>I don't smoke and I have a relatively clean work area. Other than having >a bit of oil on my fingers, my hands are usually clean. >As a result, I had not considered all those harsh environments. Sorry I >spoke (typed? up.
Wrote up? The stories I listed are what I consider normal or typical monitor dirt that seem to be quite common. Unusual would be what kids can do to monitors[1], monitors on boats (salt encrustation), and various forms of liquid, mud, or filth immersion. Most LCD monitors, such as yours, lead a quiet and sedate existence, punctuated only by the chronic replacement of bulging electrolytic capacitors and replaced only due to failing eyesight. I'm sure those are out there, but I never see them. I only see the accidents, nightmares, horror stories, filthy environments, and gross misusers. Hopefully, you can forgive me for assuming that most computer users are predisposed toward destroying their LCD monitors. Someone mentioned scratching the screen from repeated and excessive cleaning. I just realized that I've seen this at a local hospital. I don't know exactly what was happening, but my guess(tm) is that they regularly clean the screen to prevent contact infections. The scratches and wipe marks were quite visible when the display was off, but disappeared nicely with a bright background. I suspect they've learned to tolerate scratches that way. [1] No, you can't feed your computer game playmate a sandwich through the screen. -- Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
"Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@cruzio.com> wrote in message 
news:16a2tap37rdbs6ootqch2sbpb8sv426ohj@4ax.com...
> The blue masking tape doesn't harden, but costs 3 times as much. > > I managed to find a new way to destroy something with tape. Someone > bashed in the red tail light on my car in the parking lot. I didn't > have time to deal with it, so I taped up the crack and hole with clear > cellophane packing tape. (It was raining). I then forgot about it > for about 6 months. The tape came off easily enough, but the glue > remained attached to the red tail light lens.
I've seen the inverse phenomenon: a headphones cable got smooshed under the chair's rollers. So I reinforced it with some mylar tape (the good yellow kind used for transformers -- mylar film, acrylic something or other adhesive). All nice and solid for the time being. Fast forward some months: the tape is getting kind of gooey, very much unlike the almost dry tack the stuff has off the roll. Plastics are weird, and disequilibrium of plasticisers (and whatever else goes into making (in this case) neoprene(?) insulation and acrylic tape adhesive, among other things, the consistency they are) is an annoying problem. In your case, hardening due to temperature and UV might be contributors too. Tim -- Seven Transistor Labs Electrical Engineering Consultation Website: http://seventransistorlabs.com
On 8/16/2015 3:43 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 12:43:36 -0700, Jim Thompson > <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: > >>>> I use denatured alcohol straight or water diluted as my cleaning >>>> solution. >>> >>> Diluted water? Well, ok. > >> Get head out of butt... "water-diluted". > > For a moment, I was beginning to suspect that you might be into > homeopathy, where everything is diluted with alcohol or water: > <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeopathic_dilutions>
Well, a moment in geological time, maybe.
On 8/17/2015 10:55 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Mon, 17 Aug 2015 10:24:11 -0500, John S <Sophi.2@invalid.org> > wrote: > >> I don't smoke and I have a relatively clean work area. Other than having >> a bit of oil on my fingers, my hands are usually clean. >> As a result, I had not considered all those harsh environments. Sorry I >> spoke (typed? up. > > Wrote up? The stories I listed are what I consider normal or typical > monitor dirt that seem to be quite common. Unusual would be what kids > can do to monitors[1], monitors on boats (salt encrustation), and > various forms of liquid, mud, or filth immersion. Most LCD monitors, > such as yours, lead a quiet and sedate existence, punctuated only by > the chronic replacement of bulging electrolytic capacitors and > replaced only due to failing eyesight. I'm sure those are out there, > but I never see them. I only see the accidents, nightmares, horror > stories, filthy environments, and gross misusers. Hopefully, you can > forgive me for assuming that most computer users are predisposed > toward destroying their LCD monitors. > > Someone mentioned scratching the screen from repeated and excessive > cleaning. I just realized that I've seen this at a local hospital. I > don't know exactly what was happening, but my guess(tm) is that they > regularly clean the screen to prevent contact infections. The > scratches and wipe marks were quite visible when the display was off, > but disappeared nicely with a bright background. I suspect they've > learned to tolerate scratches that way.
Okay, okay, Jeff. I got your point the first time. No need to go on about it forever and reveal every stage of your life.
> [1] No, you can't feed your computer game playmate a sandwich through > the screen.
First hand experience? If you can possibly resist (which I doubt), please do not explain about feeding your computer a sandwich.
On 8/17/2015 8:29 AM, John S wrote:
> On 8/16/2015 6:39 PM, Don Y wrote:
>> Touchscreen in the car is another annoyance. Perpetually trying to >> clean fingerprints off it (which make it harder to read in certain >> light). > > Same with my iPhone. The touch screen gets dirty with fingerprints (always) and > with food (occasionally).
Wipe it on your thigh! :> At least a phone is relatively easy to reorient to minimize the (current) visibility of "fingerprints". Not as easy to do with larger, stationary displays. But, folks think of the "elegance" of a touchscreen without considering the maintenance/practical issues. Sort of like stainless steel (or *black*!) kitchen appliances.
On 8/16/2015 4:46 PM, Lasse Langwadt Christensen wrote:
> Den mandag den 17. august 2015 kl. 01.39.40 UTC+2 skrev Don Y:
>>>> In refurbishing recycled monitors, you encounter stickers, asset >>>> tags, post-it notes, cellophane taped "stuff", etc. on the display >>>> surface of monitors. The worst, by far, is masking tape that has >>>> been there WAY too long. Getting off the residue is a significant >>>> accomplishment! >>>> >>>> [Don't try this at home] >>> >>> They must use really cheap horse hoof glue on paper masking tape - >>> there are modern temporary adhesives that are so much better (eg. >>> post-it notes). >> >> I think the mantra re: masking tape is that it should only be used >> as a TEMPORARY measure. Let it dry out (or get BAKED on) and you'll >> never get the last bits off without mechanical intervention! > > yep, lots of people make the mistake of leaving the tape on for a few days > when painting windows > > you can get UV resistant masking tape that won't baked on
People don't seem to "think ahead" when it comes to sticking things on pieces of kit. Esp if it isn't *their* bit of kit! SWMBO is a painter ("artist"). You can't believe the rules regarding what comes into contact with an "original" piece of artwork! Even how it gets *stored*, displayed, etc! Obviously, folks with a long history of watching poor material choices "ruin" irreplaceable objects leads them to be fairly conservative in the do's and don'ts!
On 8/16/2015 8:43 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 19:40:29 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote: > >> So, my "100 proof" mixture is spot on! :> Now, to see if I can find >> someone who sells it -- without "embelishments"... > > I originally meant to post this as a joke, but just realized that it > seems to fit your requirements. Just 50/50 ethanol/water for $25/jar > (ouch): > <http://olesmoky.com/products/white-lightnin> > <http://olesmoky.com/products#proof100> > Maybe add a few drops of a surfactant (Photo-Flo) to prevent water > spots. Puts the fun back into LCD cleaning. Unfortunately, I predict > that the jar won't last very long.
Part of the reason for seeking a COTS "LCD cleaner" is to provide my friend with a "turn-key" solution (no pun intended). E.g., a bottle that is intended to dispense cleaning fluid in the manner appropriate for cleaning a monitor -- instead of just a generic *jar*! Likewise, something with a small "exposed surface" to minimize evaporative losses. In other parts of the country, I'd worry more about the hygroscopic characteristics. But, not a problem, here (except a short portion of the year). I use emptied "saline nasal mist" bottles -- similar to: <http://identify-pills.com/images/w/WAL00370_63978_5.JPG> but larger -- and fill with alcohol + distilled water. Cap seals nice and tight (no evaporative losses) so it doesn't spill when it gets knocked over. And, as the bottle is squeezable, it's a great applicator. [The fact that they are readily available (discards) also saves me the hassle of having to *find*/purchase a suitable bottle. That, in itself, is worth a fair bit! :> ]
On Mon, 17 Aug 2015 11:22:11 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote:

>On 8/17/2015 8:29 AM, John S wrote: >> On 8/16/2015 6:39 PM, Don Y wrote: > >>> Touchscreen in the car is another annoyance. Perpetually trying to >>> clean fingerprints off it (which make it harder to read in certain >>> light). >> >> Same with my iPhone. The touch screen gets dirty with fingerprints (always) and >> with food (occasionally). > >Wipe it on your thigh! :> > >At least a phone is relatively easy to reorient to minimize the (current) >visibility of "fingerprints". Not as easy to do with larger, stationary >displays. > >But, folks think of the "elegance" of a touchscreen without considering >the maintenance/practical issues. Sort of like stainless steel (or >*black*!) kitchen appliances.
I have designed touchscreen controller chips... I wouldn't own one ;-) ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson | mens | | Analog Innovations | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | San Tan Valley, AZ 85142 Skype: skypeanalog | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
On 8/17/2015 11:38 AM, Jim Thompson wrote:
> On Mon, 17 Aug 2015 11:22:11 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote: > >> On 8/17/2015 8:29 AM, John S wrote: >>> On 8/16/2015 6:39 PM, Don Y wrote: >> >>>> Touchscreen in the car is another annoyance. Perpetually trying to >>>> clean fingerprints off it (which make it harder to read in certain >>>> light). >>> >>> Same with my iPhone. The touch screen gets dirty with fingerprints (always) and >>> with food (occasionally). >> >> Wipe it on your thigh! :> >> >> At least a phone is relatively easy to reorient to minimize the (current) >> visibility of "fingerprints". Not as easy to do with larger, stationary >> displays. >> >> But, folks think of the "elegance" of a touchscreen without considering >> the maintenance/practical issues. Sort of like stainless steel (or >> *black*!) kitchen appliances. > > I have designed touchscreen controller chips... I wouldn't own one ;-)
It's becoming very difficult to do so, nowadays. Between phones and cars, its hard to escape the (perceived -- by manufacture) "need" for one. It was a significant concern of ours when looking for a vehicle -- I don't want to have to take my eyes off the road to ensure my finger touches the *correct* spot on a FEATURELESS, SMOOTH surface in order to *do* <whatever>. [E.g., I can dial *my* telephone with my eyes closed AND hand behind my back.] Some of the vehicles we looked at touted (genuine) iPads in the dash. C'mon... go out to the car to surf the web? That's almost as inane as sitting down at your computer to "listen to music", "watch TV", etc.