Forums

LCD cleaning

Started by Don Y August 15, 2015
On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 20:58:48 -0400, Spehro Pefhany
<speffSNIP@interlogDOTyou.knowwhat> wrote:

>On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 17:26:25 -0700, the renowned Jeff Liebermann ><jeffl@cruzio.com> wrote: > >> I can only >>imagine what packing tape will do to a plastic film coated LCD screen.
>They use a static clingy (soft) polyethylene film for keeping abrasion >marks off the screens in shipping. No adhesive at all, I believe.
Yep. Static cling works. No glues and no solvents means no problems.
>The ultra-clear Staples packing tape (they seem to have changed >suppliers it may not be currently available) has kind of a pleasant >fruity smell. Probably some cocktail of carcinogenic chemicals.
That's a sticky subject. Whatever you're smelling is probably a perfume intended to cover up a noxious chemical stench. My guess(tm) would be either acetic acid (vinegar) or some kind of animal byproduct the rots on the roll: <http://www.duckbrand.com/products/duck-tape/duck-tape-scents> (Drivel: I spent a short time working for a manufacturer of industrial flavors and fragrances). Premature solvent evaporation is why old rolls of tape tend to get stuck to adjacent layer of backing. The idea behind pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA) is that the glue has to remain tacky on the roll so that it can unrolled without sticking, but then harden when attached to a cardboard box after the protective solvent has evaporated. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pressure-sensitive_adhesive> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemistry_of_pressure-sensitive_adhesives> -- Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 13:43:46 -0700, Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@cruzio.com>
wrote:

>On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 12:43:36 -0700, Jim Thompson ><To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: > >>>>I use denatured alcohol straight or water diluted as my cleaning >>>>solution. >>> >>>Diluted water? Well, ok. > >>Get head out of butt... "water-diluted". > >For a moment, I was beginning to suspect that you might be into >homeopathy, where everything is diluted with alcohol or water: ><https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeopathic_dilutions> > >>You live in Californica... here, in AZ, it only has Methanol added to >>it to keep you from drinking it and avoiding the "spirits" tax ;-) >> ...Jim Thompson
AIUI, methanol is no longer used as a denaturant. It tends to blind and kill people rather than dissuading them from drinking it. Acetone and similar things are used to make it taste bad. Wiki says they also use something called "Denatonium", which makes it very bitter.
> >Ace Hardware is a national retail cooperative and has 4,600 locations. >Presumably, they don't supply special formulations for each state. >However, as I previously mumbled, the Ace Hardware formulation seems >to have changed over the years. > >Doesn't one have to be dead in order to tax their spirit? Taxing the >dead seems rather non-productive.
Yet the Democrats just love the death-tax. Of course there isn't a tax that they don't love.
On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 15:14:01 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote:

>On 8/16/2015 10:36 AM, John S wrote: >> On 8/16/2015 11:55 AM, Don Y wrote: >>> On 8/16/2015 9:32 AM, John S wrote: >>> >>>>> [1] Of course, you *make* this from distilled water and isopropyl >>>>> alcohol -- save the "good stuff" for drinking! :> >>>> >>>> I recommend Everclear (190 proof) available at the liquor store. Very few >>>> impurities. >>> >>> Yes, I use it for making "extracts" (e.g., for baking flavorings). It's >>> far more expensive than isopropyl alcohol; not keen on using that to clean >>> screens! :-/ >> >> I can usually clean my screen by first using a soft brush to remove the dust >> and then the microfiber wipe with no chemicals applied. You must have a >> difficult environment if you need a solvent. > >I was asking for a friend -- who's not keen on having to mix up an >alcohol+water "mister". > >Note that many people don't use their displays as "view only" devices. >Some have a habit of pointing to things *on* the screen (thus oils >from hands). I've also seen *pen* marks on screens (d'uh... whatever >you've underlined won't be there, later!).
I point at my displays all the time. How else do you use a touch screen? ;-)
> >In refurbishing recycled monitors, you encounter stickers, asset >tags, post-it notes, cellophane taped "stuff", etc. on the display >surface of monitors. The worst, by far, is masking tape that has >been there WAY too long. Getting off the residue is a significant >accomplishment!
Goo Gone?
> >[Don't try this at home]
On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 18:32:09 -0700, Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@cruzio.com>
Gave us:

> a noxious chemical stench.
Please refrain from talking about Jim Thompson. It is bad enough his stench smells like some old fogey's wafting underwear and he waves it around the group.
On 8/16/2015 5:26 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 16:39:49 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote: > >> I think the mantra re: masking tape is that it should only be used >> as a TEMPORARY measure. Let it dry out (or get BAKED on) and you'll >> never get the last bits off without mechanical intervention! > > The blue masking tape doesn't harden, but costs 3 times as much.
Wouldn't matter for *me* -- I'd never put tape on an LCD *screen*! And, I have no influence over what *other* folks choose to STICK on their equipment. :<
> I managed to find a new way to destroy something with tape. Someone > bashed in the red tail light on my car in the parking lot. I didn't > have time to deal with it, so I taped up the crack and hole with clear > cellophane packing tape. (It was raining). I then forgot about it > for about 6 months. The tape came off easily enough, but the glue > remained attached to the red tail light lens. I attacked the glue > with every solvent that I could find that didn't also attack the > acrylic plastic. I eventually determined that the solvent in the > packing tape glue had softened the plastic which then displaced the > glue. I'll eventually patch it back together and buff it smooth, but > the solvent action of the adhesive was rather a surprise. I can only > imagine what packing tape will do to a plastic film coated LCD screen.
You can actually get off even the 2" wide tape -- if you are immensely patient. OTOH, I sure wouldn't want anyone sticking a piece of it on any of *my* screens!
On 8/16/2015 4:35 PM, Kevin McMurtrie wrote:
>> On Sat, 15 Aug 2015 18:44:07 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote:
>>> I've always advocated "100 proof"[1] alcohol and a microfiber rag to >>> clean LCD monitors. Is there a commercial product (that doesn't >>> have silly additives, dyes, etc.) that I can recommend to a friend >>> for the same purpose (albeit much more expensive)?
> Isopropyl alcohol almost never has oil added but all non-drinkable > alcohols may have bitter flavors added to them. It varies by brand and > checking is as easy as letting a drop evaporate on glass. > > The other problem with pure alcohol is that it tends to dissolve a bit > too much, like skin oils and metal oxides, and deposit them to the > glass. Adding a bit of mineral free water can make it a lot more > practical for cleaning outside a laboratory.
So, my "100 proof" mixture is spot on! :> Now, to see if I can find someone who sells it -- without "embelishments"...
On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 19:40:29 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote:

>So, my "100 proof" mixture is spot on! :> Now, to see if I can find >someone who sells it -- without "embelishments"...
I originally meant to post this as a joke, but just realized that it seems to fit your requirements. Just 50/50 ethanol/water for $25/jar (ouch): <http://olesmoky.com/products/white-lightnin> <http://olesmoky.com/products#proof100> Maybe add a few drops of a surfactant (Photo-Flo) to prevent water spots. Puts the fun back into LCD cleaning. Unfortunately, I predict that the jar won't last very long. -- Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 18:24:00 -0700 (PDT), the renowned Phil Hobbs
<pcdhobbs@gmail.com> wrote:

>>fruity > >Ethyl acetate smells like that, and is pretty benign. > >Cheers > >Phil Hobbs
Joke.. I often tear it with teeth. It's described as acrylate odor, though I've not been able to find a real MSDS.. adhesives seem to be closely held trade secrets. Some Taiwanese executives got caught up around 10 years ago in an "espionage" deal by hiring as a 'consultant' a fellow who had worked for Avery.. they ended up not being really punished as they headed home to Taiwan and they can't likely be extradited for something that's not a crime in their own country (pretty much accepted business practices). The payment was a modest fee, ~$25K made out to a family member of the mole. --sp -- Best regards, Spehro Pefhany Amazon link for AoE 3rd Edition: http://tinyurl.com/ntrpwu8 Microchip link for 2015 Masters in Phoenix: http://tinyurl.com/l7g2k48
On 8/16/2015 10:18 AM, Martin Riddle wrote:
> On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 09:25:02 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote: > >> On 8/15/2015 7:41 PM, Martin Riddle wrote: >>> On Sat, 15 Aug 2015 18:44:07 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote: >> >>>> I've always advocated "100 proof"[1] alcohol and a microfiber rag to >>>> clean LCD monitors. Is there a commercial product (that doesn't >>>> have silly additives, dyes, etc.) that I can recommend to a friend >>>> for the same purpose (albeit much more expensive)? >> >>> I use the Monster LCD cleaning kit, blue dye maybe? but it does have a >>> microfiber rag with it. I perfer the matte finish displays so I dont >>> see the streaks. >> >> What does it have listed for ingredients? > > De-ionized water and proprietary polymers. > It's actually clear, the bottle is blue.
"Proprietary polymers"... makes me think of products like "Armor All" and *that* outcome! :<
On 8/16/2015 2:11 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 12:36:35 -0500, John S <Sophi.2@invalid.org> > wrote: > >> I can usually clean my screen by first using a soft brush to remove the >> dust and then the microfiber wipe with no chemicals applied. You must >> have a difficult environment if you need a solvent. > > I see an average of 5 different laptops per week. You will be amazed > at how filthy they can be in a fairly short time. The worst are the > automotive repair shop laptops (used for running diagnostics), that > are usually covered with a thick layer of grease and grime. Then, > there are the smokers, where the LCD monitor screen contains a vapor > deposited layer of tar and whatever else they put in cancer sticks > these days. The road warrior likes to sip coffee while checking his > email at Starbucks, so the screen is coated with food and beverage > spatterings. The home economist often likes to use the laptop on the > kitchen counter, with predictable results. I think the worst is the > machine shop, where the LCD display and all the plastic case parts, > were encrusted with hot metal chips, that had melted their way into > the plastic and become permanent. I almost forgot the customer that > wanted me to "adjust" her computer and then informed me after I was > done that the yellow goo on the bottom of the screen was actually cat > urine. Yes, some chemicals are usually required.
I don't smoke and I have a relatively clean work area. Other than having a bit of oil on my fingers, my hands are usually clean. As a result, I had not considered all those harsh environments. Sorry I spoke (typed? up.