Forums

LCD cleaning

Started by Don Y August 15, 2015
Hi,

I've always advocated "100 proof"[1] alcohol and a microfiber rag to
clean LCD monitors.  Is there a commercial product (that doesn't
have silly additives, dyes, etc.) that I can recommend to a friend
for the same purpose (albeit much more expensive)?

Thx,
--don

[1] Of course, you *make* this from distilled water and isopropyl
alcohol -- save the "good stuff" for drinking!  :>
On Sat, 15 Aug 2015 18:44:07 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote:

>Hi, > >I've always advocated "100 proof"[1] alcohol and a microfiber rag to >clean LCD monitors. Is there a commercial product (that doesn't >have silly additives, dyes, etc.) that I can recommend to a friend >for the same purpose (albeit much more expensive)? > >Thx, >--don > >[1] Of course, you *make* this from distilled water and isopropyl >alcohol -- save the "good stuff" for drinking! :>
I use the Monster LCD cleaning kit, blue dye maybe? but it does have a microfiber rag with it. I perfer the matte finish displays so I dont see the streaks. Cheers
On Sat, 15 Aug 2015 18:44:07 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote:

>I've always advocated "100 proof"[1] alcohol and a microfiber rag to >clean LCD monitors. Is there a commercial product (that doesn't >have silly additives, dyes, etc.) that I can recommend to a friend >for the same purpose (albeit much more expensive)?
Sigh. Everyone has their own favorite concoction. I use 409 "Glass and Surface" cleaner and a paper towel. That removes the grease, dust, dirt, filth, fingerprints, and food stains from the screen. However, it also leaves visible streaks on the glass. To remove those, I wipe lightly with a *DRY* microfiber rag. <https://www.cloroxprofessional.com/products/formula-409-glass-surface-cleaner/at-a-glance/> I also use 409 "All Purpose Cleaner" for glass monitors. It's not recommended for glass: <https://www.formula409.com/products/comparison-tool/> but if I work fast and don't let it puddle, it works well enough. Some pundits recommend a tiny amount of liquid soap and water: <http://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-clean-your-monitor-or-tv-screen/> That works, but one still has to wipe off the streaks with a microfiber rag. Others believe that white vinegar and water is the magic elixir: <http://www.howtogeek.com/170080/the-how-to-geek-guide-to-cleaning-your-lcd-monitor-screen/> If you don't mind the smell, vinegar should also work. The reason I don't use alcohol has nothing to do with cleaning the glass screen. That part works just fine. The problem is that the alcohol attacks the stickers and keycap silk screening on laptops. Most are immune but I've managed to destroy a few keyboards and stickers with alcohol. I've found that even the solvent residue left on my fingers after cleaning the screen can cause problems. Ammonia has similar problems so that should also be used carefully. I also have a suspicion that the de-vulcanization of the rubberized paint used on laptops is initiated by ammonia, but haven't bothered to setup a controlled experiment. Best to avoid alcohol and ammonia cleaners. According to numerous experts, the danger is that the solvent of choice might remove, damage, or streak the anti-reflective coating on the screen. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-reflective_coating> So, I took several old laptop screens and tested the theory. If there was an anti-reflective coating (usually magnesium fluoride), none of the basic cleaning chemicals I've already mentioned did any damage. I did try some real TSP (tri sodium phosphate made from soda ash and phosphoric acid), which etched and trashed the glass. Looks like nitric acid will attack magnesium fluoride. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnesium_fluoride> In many matt LCD monitors, there is no coating. Instead, they use a thin plastic film as in: <http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1674033> -- Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
On Sat, 15 Aug 2015 18:44:07 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> Gave us:

>Hi, > >I've always advocated "100 proof"[1] alcohol and a microfiber rag to >clean LCD monitors. Is there a commercial product (that doesn't >have silly additives, dyes, etc.) that I can recommend to a friend >for the same purpose (albeit much more expensive)? > >Thx, >--don > >[1] Of course, you *make* this from distilled water and isopropyl >alcohol -- save the "good stuff" for drinking! :>
The instant hand cleaner. A variety that has no lotion in it (hard to find) Works well, because it has a different kind of alcohol than IPA in it.
On Sat, 15 Aug 2015 18:44:07 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote:

>Hi, > >I've always advocated "100 proof"[1] alcohol and a microfiber rag to >clean LCD monitors. Is there a commercial product (that doesn't >have silly additives, dyes, etc.) that I can recommend to a friend >for the same purpose (albeit much more expensive)? > >Thx, >--don > >[1] Of course, you *make* this from distilled water and isopropyl >alcohol -- save the "good stuff" for drinking! :>
Isopropyl alcohol generally has oil added ("rubbing" alcohol). I use denatured alcohol straight or water diluted as my cleaning solution. (You can buy denatured alcohol in the paint department of most hardware stores.) ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson | mens | | Analog Innovations | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | San Tan Valley, AZ 85142 Skype: skypeanalog | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
On 8/15/2015 7:41 PM, Martin Riddle wrote:
> On Sat, 15 Aug 2015 18:44:07 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote:
>> I've always advocated "100 proof"[1] alcohol and a microfiber rag to >> clean LCD monitors. Is there a commercial product (that doesn't >> have silly additives, dyes, etc.) that I can recommend to a friend >> for the same purpose (albeit much more expensive)?
> I use the Monster LCD cleaning kit, blue dye maybe? but it does have a > microfiber rag with it. I perfer the matte finish displays so I dont > see the streaks.
What does it have listed for ingredients?
On 8/15/2015 8:44 PM, Don Y wrote:
> Hi, > > I've always advocated "100 proof"[1] alcohol and a microfiber rag to > clean LCD monitors. Is there a commercial product (that doesn't > have silly additives, dyes, etc.) that I can recommend to a friend > for the same purpose (albeit much more expensive)? > > Thx, > --don > > [1] Of course, you *make* this from distilled water and isopropyl > alcohol -- save the "good stuff" for drinking! :>
I recommend Everclear (190 proof) available at the liquor store. Very few impurities.
On 8/15/2015 8:47 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Sat, 15 Aug 2015 18:44:07 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote: > >> I've always advocated "100 proof"[1] alcohol and a microfiber rag to >> clean LCD monitors. Is there a commercial product (that doesn't >> have silly additives, dyes, etc.) that I can recommend to a friend >> for the same purpose (albeit much more expensive)? > > Sigh. Everyone has their own favorite concoction.
<rolls eyes> Yeah, I've seen WD40, mineral spirits, acetone, etc. OTOH, when someone has put packing tape *on* the screen... or, silly little stickers... <frown>
> I use 409 "Glass and Surface" cleaner and a paper towel. That removes > the grease, dust, dirt, filth, fingerprints, and food stains from the > screen. However, it also leaves visible streaks on the glass. To > remove those, I wipe lightly with a *DRY* microfiber rag. > <https://www.cloroxprofessional.com/products/formula-409-glass-surface-cleaner/at-a-glance/>
Hmmm... the list of ingredients seems to include abrasives. I guess for glass it would be OK. Not sure how well that would fare on the flimsy "plastic film" coatings on many LCD monitors (?)
> I also use 409 "All Purpose Cleaner" for glass monitors. It's not > recommended for glass: > <https://www.formula409.com/products/comparison-tool/> > but if I work fast and don't let it puddle, it works well enough. > > Some pundits recommend a tiny amount of liquid soap and water: > <http://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-clean-your-monitor-or-tv-screen/> > That works, but one still has to wipe off the streaks with a > microfiber rag.
Problem with soap is it leaves a residue.
> Others believe that white vinegar and water is the magic elixir: > <http://www.howtogeek.com/170080/the-how-to-geek-guide-to-cleaning-your-lcd-monitor-screen/> > If you don't mind the smell, vinegar should also work.
Yeah, a friend suggested that. But, it's also "not over the counter" (i.e., would need to be "mixed" prior to use)
> The reason I don't use alcohol has nothing to do with cleaning the > glass screen. That part works just fine. The problem is that the > alcohol attacks the stickers and keycap silk screening on laptops. > Most are immune but I've managed to destroy a few keyboards and > stickers with alcohol. I've found that even the solvent residue left > on my fingers after cleaning the screen can cause problems.
Not looking at laptop screens but, rather, LCD monitors.
> Ammonia > has similar problems so that should also be used carefully. I also
Yes. Hence no Windex.
> have a suspicion that the de-vulcanization of the rubberized paint > used on laptops is initiated by ammonia, but haven't bothered to setup > a controlled experiment. Best to avoid alcohol and ammonia cleaners. > > According to numerous experts, the danger is that the solvent of > choice might remove, damage, or streak the anti-reflective coating on > the screen. > <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-reflective_coating> > So, I took several old laptop screens and tested the theory. If there > was an anti-reflective coating (usually magnesium fluoride), none of > the basic cleaning chemicals I've already mentioned did any damage. I
I think it is a matter of continued use that causes the problem. You'd probably never see it from incremental use. But, compare one that had been cleaned X times against one that hadn't...
> did try some real TSP (tri sodium phosphate made from soda ash and
Ha! I use that to clean the roof prior to painting it. That stuff will take your *fingerprints* off (i.e., off your *fingers*!)
> phosphoric acid), which etched and trashed the glass. Looks like > nitric acid will attack magnesium fluoride. > <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnesium_fluoride> > In many matt LCD monitors, there is no coating. Instead, they use a > thin plastic film as in: > <http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1674033>
Yes. There is also the risk of "scrubbing" to remove a persistent stain that could mechanically damage the screen.
On 8/16/2015 8:12 AM, Jim Thompson wrote:
> On Sat, 15 Aug 2015 18:44:07 -0700, Don Y <this@is.not.me.com> wrote: > >> Hi, >> >> I've always advocated "100 proof"[1] alcohol and a microfiber rag to >> clean LCD monitors. Is there a commercial product (that doesn't >> have silly additives, dyes, etc.) that I can recommend to a friend >> for the same purpose (albeit much more expensive)? >> >> Thx, >> --don >> >> [1] Of course, you *make* this from distilled water and isopropyl >> alcohol -- save the "good stuff" for drinking! :> > > Isopropyl alcohol generally has oil added ("rubbing" alcohol).
Really? The label on the bottle I have (91%) lists "isopropyl alcohol" as the "active ingredient" and "water" as the "inactive ingredient". Do labeling laws allow "other ingredients" to NOT be listed? (i.e., if less than X%)
> I use denatured alcohol straight or water diluted as my cleaning > solution. > > (You can buy denatured alcohol in the paint department of most > hardware stores.)
That may be a safer bet. Thanks!
On 8/16/2015 9:32 AM, John S wrote:

>> [1] Of course, you *make* this from distilled water and isopropyl >> alcohol -- save the "good stuff" for drinking! :> > > I recommend Everclear (190 proof) available at the liquor store. Very few > impurities.
Yes, I use it for making "extracts" (e.g., for baking flavorings). It's far more expensive than isopropyl alcohol; not keen on using that to clean screens! :-/