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SATA interface for EIDE drive?

Started by cameo May 25, 2015
I've got an old WD hard drive whose original EIDE PCB got bad and I 
could not get an exact PCB replacement for it. A supposed expert on hard 
drives suggested that I might try to attach a SATA PCB to the drive and 
that could work because the drives themselves are pretty much the same 
and WD just started attaching SATA PCBs in later years to the same 
drives that used to have enhanced IDE PCB-s.
Well, I'm kinda' skeptical for several reasons, first being that SATA 
also uses 3.3V power in addition of the traditional 5V and 12V provided 
by the 4-pin Molex connector. Then there is the question of the on-board 
ROM compatibility with the drive.

What do the electronics engineers among you think about this?
On 5/25/2015 10:54 AM, cameo wrote:
> I've got an old WD hard drive whose original EIDE PCB got bad and I could not > get an exact PCB replacement for it. A supposed expert on hard drives suggested > that I might try to attach a SATA PCB to the drive and that could work because > the drives themselves are pretty much the same and WD just started attaching > SATA PCBs in later years to the same drives that used to have enhanced IDE PCB-s. > Well, I'm kinda' skeptical for several reasons, first being that SATA also uses > 3.3V power in addition of the traditional 5V and 12V provided by the 4-pin > Molex connector. Then there is the question of the on-board ROM compatibility > with the drive. > > What do the electronics engineers among you think about this?
Buy a new disk. "Old", "EIDE" suggest it can't be bigger than 500G to begin with. So, less than $50 of kit at stake. Of course, if you're doing this because its *contents* are precious, you have now learned the valuable lesson of why backups are important! :>
On Mon, 25 May 2015 10:54:48 -0700, cameo <cameo@unreal.invalid> Gave
us:

>I've got an old WD hard drive whose original EIDE PCB got bad and I >could not get an exact PCB replacement for it. A supposed expert on hard >drives suggested that I might try to attach a SATA PCB to the drive and >that could work because the drives themselves are pretty much the same >and WD just started attaching SATA PCBs in later years to the same >drives that used to have enhanced IDE PCB-s. >Well, I'm kinda' skeptical for several reasons, first being that SATA >also uses 3.3V power in addition of the traditional 5V and 12V provided >by the 4-pin Molex connector. Then there is the question of the on-board >ROM compatibility with the drive. > >What do the electronics engineers among you think about this?
The board is tied to the drive. It gets configured at the factory, and there are hard sector flags which get written to it. The info gets kept on the drive controller. I doubt there is any way to 'revive' the drive yourself, but WD will preform data recovery on it for you, at a substantial cost. It has nothing to do with the interface. There are things which the drive has done to it upon initial 'configuration' which gets stored on the controller PCB. Those boys at the factory, however can open the drive and perform direct read access on it, and 'recover' files. You... likely not. Emergency data recovery should be a lot cheaper than it used to be, but it isn't.
On 25/05/2015 18:54, cameo wrote:
> I've got an old WD hard drive whose original EIDE PCB got bad and I > could not get an exact PCB replacement for it. A supposed expert on hard > drives suggested that I might try to attach a SATA PCB to the drive and > that could work because the drives themselves are pretty much the same > and WD just started attaching SATA PCBs in later years to the same > drives that used to have enhanced IDE PCB-s. > Well, I'm kinda' skeptical for several reasons, first being that SATA > also uses 3.3V power in addition of the traditional 5V and 12V provided > by the 4-pin Molex connector. Then there is the question of the on-board > ROM compatibility with the drive. > > What do the electronics engineers among you think about this?
You might be lucky if you can find the exact drive and swap the controller card. I did this once a long time ago with success and probably a lot of luck, but I never managed it a second time... Deffo no chance fitting a SATA card- chalk and cheese. --- This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active. http://www.avast.com
On Monday, May 25, 2015 at 1:58:38 PM UTC-7, TTman wrote:
> On 25/05/2015 18:54, cameo wrote: > > I've got an old WD hard drive whose original EIDE PCB got bad and I > > could not get an exact PCB replacement for it. A supposed expert on hard > > drives suggested that I might try to attach a SATA PCB to the drive and > > that could work
> You might be lucky if you can find the exact drive and swap the > controller card. I did this once a long time ago with success and > probably a lot of luck, but I never managed it a second time... > Deffo no chance fitting a SATA card- chalk and cheese.
I've done it dozens of times, and it usually works. The trick is, you have to have the same drive manufacture series (the old Quantum Fireball drives had 4G, 6G, and 13G drives with interchangeable controllers). The clue is when you examine the motor and disk head connections: if those don't line up, your data won't be forthcoming. There MIGHT nowadays be calibration data in flash on the controller, but it always used to be on the tracks that were read at self-test time.
On 5/25/2015 11:06 AM, Don Y wrote:
> On 5/25/2015 10:54 AM, cameo wrote: >> I've got an old WD hard drive whose original EIDE PCB got bad and I >> could not >> get an exact PCB replacement for it. A supposed expert on hard drives >> suggested >> that I might try to attach a SATA PCB to the drive and that could work >> because >> the drives themselves are pretty much the same and WD just started >> attaching >> SATA PCBs in later years to the same drives that used to have enhanced >> IDE PCB-s. >> Well, I'm kinda' skeptical for several reasons, first being that SATA >> also uses >> 3.3V power in addition of the traditional 5V and 12V provided by the >> 4-pin >> Molex connector. Then there is the question of the on-board ROM >> compatibility >> with the drive. >> >> What do the electronics engineers among you think about this? > > Buy a new disk. "Old", "EIDE" suggest it can't be bigger than 500G > to begin with. So, less than $50 of kit at stake. > > Of course, if you're doing this because its *contents* are precious, > you have now learned the valuable lesson of why backups are important! > > :>
Indeed it is for the content and IT WAS my backup drive in an external USB2 enclosure. I backed up the HD of my old PC that I then recycled after wiping its HD.
On 5/25/2015 4:25 PM, whit3rd wrote:
> On Monday, May 25, 2015 at 1:58:38 PM UTC-7, TTman wrote: >> On 25/05/2015 18:54, cameo wrote: >>> I've got an old WD hard drive whose original EIDE PCB got bad and I >>> could not get an exact PCB replacement for it. A supposed expert on hard >>> drives suggested that I might try to attach a SATA PCB to the drive and >>> that could work > >> You might be lucky if you can find the exact drive and swap the >> controller card. I did this once a long time ago with success and >> probably a lot of luck, but I never managed it a second time... >> Deffo no chance fitting a SATA card- chalk and cheese. > > I've done it dozens of times, and it usually works. The trick is, you have to > have the same drive manufacture series (the old Quantum Fireball drives > had 4G, 6G, and 13G drives with interchangeable controllers). The clue > is when you examine the motor and disk head connections: if those don't > line up, your data won't be forthcoming. > > There MIGHT nowadays be calibration data in flash on the controller, but it > always used to be on the tracks that were read at self-test time.
My research indicates that Western Digital enhanced IDE drives are unfortunately more tied to specific PCBs than other brands.
On 5/25/2015 5:08 PM, cameo wrote:
> On 5/25/2015 11:06 AM, Don Y wrote: >> On 5/25/2015 10:54 AM, cameo wrote: >>> I've got an old WD hard drive whose original EIDE PCB got bad and I >>> could not >>> get an exact PCB replacement for it. A supposed expert on hard drives >>> suggested >>> that I might try to attach a SATA PCB to the drive and that could work >>> because >>> the drives themselves are pretty much the same and WD just started >>> attaching >>> SATA PCBs in later years to the same drives that used to have enhanced >>> IDE PCB-s. >>> Well, I'm kinda' skeptical for several reasons, first being that SATA >>> also uses >>> 3.3V power in addition of the traditional 5V and 12V provided by the >>> 4-pin >>> Molex connector. Then there is the question of the on-board ROM >>> compatibility >>> with the drive. >>> >>> What do the electronics engineers among you think about this? >> >> Buy a new disk. "Old", "EIDE" suggest it can't be bigger than 500G >> to begin with. So, less than $50 of kit at stake. >> >> Of course, if you're doing this because its *contents* are precious, >> you have now learned the valuable lesson of why backups are important! >> >> :> > > Indeed it is for the content and IT WAS my backup drive in an external USB2 > enclosure. I backed up the HD of my old PC that I then recycled after wiping > its HD.
Once you recycled the ORIGINAL drive ("old PC") then this was no longer a backup but, rather, THE original! (any time you have only one copy of data, *that's* the original!) Next time, pull the drive out of your PC before recycling -- at least until you have verified the contents have been transfered to another device (in addition to your "backup")
cameo wrote:
> On 5/25/2015 11:06 AM, Don Y wrote: >> On 5/25/2015 10:54 AM, cameo wrote: >>> I've got an old WD hard drive whose original EIDE PCB got bad and I >>> could not >>> get an exact PCB replacement for it. A supposed expert on hard drives >>> suggested >>> that I might try to attach a SATA PCB to the drive and that could work >>> because >>> the drives themselves are pretty much the same and WD just started >>> attaching >>> SATA PCBs in later years to the same drives that used to have enhanced >>> IDE PCB-s. >>> Well, I'm kinda' skeptical for several reasons, first being that SATA >>> also uses >>> 3.3V power in addition of the traditional 5V and 12V provided by the >>> 4-pin >>> Molex connector. Then there is the question of the on-board ROM >>> compatibility >>> with the drive. >>> >>> What do the electronics engineers among you think about this? >> >> Buy a new disk. "Old", "EIDE" suggest it can't be bigger than 500G >> to begin with. So, less than $50 of kit at stake. >> >> Of course, if you're doing this because its *contents* are precious, >> you have now learned the valuable lesson of why backups are important! >> >> :> > > Indeed it is for the content and IT WAS my backup drive in an external > USB2 enclosure. I backed up the HD of my old PC that I then recycled > after wiping its HD. >
There are IDE<-->SATA<-->IDE adapters that do a perfect job; allowing a PATA drive "look" exactly like a SATA drive for your modern computer, and they are fairly inexpensive (I use the one by HDE). And there are IDE/SATA<--->IDE adapters that work reasonably well; i prefer the Prudent Way version (more reliable).
Don Y wrote:
> On 5/25/2015 5:08 PM, cameo wrote: >> On 5/25/2015 11:06 AM, Don Y wrote: >>> On 5/25/2015 10:54 AM, cameo wrote: >>>> I've got an old WD hard drive whose original EIDE PCB got bad and I >>>> could not >>>> get an exact PCB replacement for it. A supposed expert on hard drives >>>> suggested >>>> that I might try to attach a SATA PCB to the drive and that could work >>>> because >>>> the drives themselves are pretty much the same and WD just started >>>> attaching >>>> SATA PCBs in later years to the same drives that used to have enhanced >>>> IDE PCB-s. >>>> Well, I'm kinda' skeptical for several reasons, first being that SATA >>>> also uses >>>> 3.3V power in addition of the traditional 5V and 12V provided by the >>>> 4-pin >>>> Molex connector. Then there is the question of the on-board ROM >>>> compatibility >>>> with the drive. >>>> >>>> What do the electronics engineers among you think about this? >>> >>> Buy a new disk. "Old", "EIDE" suggest it can't be bigger than 500G >>> to begin with. So, less than $50 of kit at stake. >>> >>> Of course, if you're doing this because its *contents* are precious, >>> you have now learned the valuable lesson of why backups are important! >>> >>> :> >> >> Indeed it is for the content and IT WAS my backup drive in an external >> USB2 >> enclosure. I backed up the HD of my old PC that I then recycled after >> wiping >> its HD. > > Once you recycled the ORIGINAL drive ("old PC") then this was no longer > a backup but, rather, THE original! (any time you have only one copy > of data, *that's* the original!)
* NOPE! The copy or second drive can have different contents (less, more,altered). Then the original might get clobbered...leaving one with a source for possible re-construction (hopefully onto a THIRD drive). Whether that original drive exists or not now, whether its contents are scrambled or not, makes NO DIFFERENCE. I can claim that i have a PERFECT COPY of his original, but that is all i have..a perfect copy - it ain't the original. Kapish?
> > Next time, pull the drive out of your PC before recycling -- at least > until you have verified the contents have been transfered to another > device (in addition to your "backup") >