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Re: Why Adding a Voltage Amplifier after a Transimpedance Amplifier reduce BW? Book Claim by 0.64

Started by Phil Hobbs May 14, 2015
On 5/14/2015 1:48 PM, Felipe Jimenez wrote:
> On Thursday, May 14, 2015 at 10:18:10 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote: >> On 05/14/2015 01:12 PM, Phil Hobbs wrote: >>> On 05/14/2015 01:04 PM, Felipe Jimenez wrote: >>>> On Thursday, May 14, 2015 at 9:28:05 AM UTC-7, John Larkin >>>> wrote: >>>>> On Thu, 14 May 2015 09:15:53 -0700 (PDT), George Herold >>>>> <gherold@teachspin.com> wrote: >>>>> >>>>>> On Thursday, May 14, 2015 at 11:57:36 AM UTC-4, Phil Hobbs >>>>>> wrote: >>>>>>> On 05/14/2015 11:50 AM, John Larkin wrote: >>>>>>>> On Thu, 14 May 2015 04:07:59 -0700 (PDT), Phil Hobbs >>>>>>>> <pcdhobbs@gmail.com> wrote: >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> Oh and I'm fairly certain the non-inverting >>>>>>>>>> amplifier is wired up correctly. Between switching >>>>>>>>>> back and forth from the non-inverting to the >>>>>>>>>> inverting configuration several times, I am fairly >>>>>>>>>> certain that both configurations were wired up >>>>>>>>>> properly. >>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>> Hmm... "several times" does make it sound like a >>>>>>>>> solderless breadboard, as John suggested. Those >>>>>>>>> things are slabs of misery, for sure. >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>> Someone deserves an IgNobel prize for inventing them. >>>>>>> >>>>>>> They work okay for making a PIC blink a LED, as long as >>>>>>> they're new. >>>>>>> >>>>>>> Then of course somebody plugs in a resistor from an old >>>>>>> reel without removing the residual adhesive, and two of >>>>>>> the holes become flaky forever. Then the next resistor >>>>>>> is maybe oversize, and bends the crappy metal fingers >>>>>>> apart, and the one after that is corroded, and leaves >>>>>>> semi-insulating dust all over the place.... >>>>>>> >>>>>>> Not to mention a couple of pF of capacitance between >>>>>>> adjacent rows, and many nanohenries in series with all >>>>>>> the (nastily daisy chained) grounds. >>>>>>> >>>>>>> Cheers >>>>>>> >>>>>>> Phil Hobbs >>>>>>> >>>>>>> >>>>>>> -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant >>>>>>> ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, >>>>>>> Photonics, Analog Electronics >>>>>>> >>>>>>> 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 >>>>>>> >>>>>>> hobbs at electrooptical dot net >>>>>>> http://electrooptical.net >>>>>> >>>>>> Grin, I was laying out this little pressure circuit for >>>>>> testing the other day, a few flaky connections later and I >>>>>> grabbed my soldering iron and copper clad. >>>>>> >>>>>> I need to order more (copper clad) any decent sources? >>>>>> >>>>>> George H. >>>>> >>>>> ebay usually has tons. Or I can send you a few sheets. I >>>>> might even include a bit of the gold stuff. >>>>> >>>>> https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Protos/Z356_EOM_Timer/Z356_Top.JPG >>>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>> >>>>>
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Protos/Z338_PCB.JPG
>>>>> >>>>> https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Protos/D200_BB_4.JPG >>>>> >>>>> >>>> >>>> >>>>>
Hey John...I'm always looking to improve my prototyping skills...What
>>>> do you use to cut away your copper on your prototypes? I just >>>> use a razor and slice back and forth, but then I may create >>>> shorts when I fill that part with solder. I see your prototypes >>>> have a pretty good clearance when cutting away the copper to >>>> make isolated pads. >>>> >>> >>> Serrated aviation snips (Wiss M3). They last for years. >> >> For making pads, you cut up small rectangles and glue them to the >> ground plane. That makes good power supply bus bars, too. >> >> Cheers >> >> Phil Hobbs > > That is true and I'll glue my surfboards onto the copper boards for > ICs (when required), but I noticed John cut away his copper in a > pretty nice fashion (along with gluing boards). As for me, I prefer > to cut away copper for isolated pads instead of gluing a bunch of > small pieces of copper to the board. Mainly because I never have glue > around when I need it. And those serrated aviation clips. We have > them and I hate them :) I can't cut straight long (several inches) > pieces of copper board to save my life.
If you want pretty, dead bug will break your heart. ;) Of course you can just waste a bit of material--cut it roughly but half an inch oversize, then trim it afterwards. You can get cyanoacrylate in 1-oz bottles, which last for 3 years or so. Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 hobbs at electrooptical dot net http://electrooptical.net