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icicle pics

Started by John Larkin March 4, 2015
https://www.flickr.com/photos/nonlin/sets/72157619114347064

The curved ones, on the second page, are mine.


-- 

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing   laser drivers and controllers

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com

On Thu, 5 Mar 2015 09:00:03 -0800 (PST),
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:

>On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:45:55 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote: >> https://www.flickr.com/photos/nonlin/sets/72157619114347064 >> >> The curved ones, on the second page, are mine. > >Looks like one heck of an ice dam problem.
I don't know of any problems; it does sometimes get noisy in the night, when tons of snow break loose and slide off the roof. The building codes up here specify a snow load of 400 pounds per square foot, and sometimes that's not enough. But I thought the icicle images were astounding. I still can't figure out how this can happen. Nice planet we live on. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc picosecond timing laser drivers and controllers jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com http://www.highlandtechnology.com
On Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 12:07:39 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
> On Thu, 5 Mar 2015 09:00:03 -0800 (PST), > bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote: > > >On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:45:55 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote: > >> https://www.flickr.com/photos/nonlin/sets/72157619114347064 > >> > >> The curved ones, on the second page, are mine. > > > >Looks like one heck of an ice dam problem. > > I don't know of any problems; it does sometimes get noisy in the > night, when tons of snow break loose and slide off the roof. The > building codes up here specify a snow load of 400 pounds per square > foot, and sometimes that's not enough.
400 Lbs??? That's kind of huge considering even Denver is only 90 psf. The problem with ice dams is not roof collapsing but water leakage. https://www.disastersafety.org/freezing_weather/preventing-ice-dams-on-homes/
> > But I thought the icicle images were astounding. I still can't figure > out how this can happen. > > Nice planet we live on. > > > -- > > John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc > picosecond timing laser drivers and controllers > > jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com > http://www.highlandtechnology.com
On Thu, 5 Mar 2015 09:23:42 -0800 (PST),
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote:

>On Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 12:07:39 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote: >> On Thu, 5 Mar 2015 09:00:03 -0800 (PST), >> bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote: >> >> >On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:45:55 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote: >> >> https://www.flickr.com/photos/nonlin/sets/72157619114347064 >> >> >> >> The curved ones, on the second page, are mine. >> > >> >Looks like one heck of an ice dam problem. >> >> I don't know of any problems; it does sometimes get noisy in the >> night, when tons of snow break loose and slide off the roof. The >> building codes up here specify a snow load of 400 pounds per square >> foot, and sometimes that's not enough. > >400 Lbs??? That's kind of huge considering even Denver is only 90 psf. The problem with ice dams is not roof collapsing but water leakage.
The problem up here, in big-snow years, is decks collapsing or being ripped off the sides of houses.
> >https://www.disastersafety.org/freezing_weather/preventing-ice-dams-on-homes/
The roof is metal, and fairly steep, 45 degrees roughly, which is typical up here. I don't see ice dams. We do get the cool slow creep and curl effect, but the curls usually break before they touch the house. We have seen the occasional curved icicle touch a window. In the winter of 2010-2011, we got 80 feet of snow on the Sierra crest. There was a continuous curve of snow from the roof of our cabin to our neighbor's. https://www.dropbox.com/s/qk0vlsven5ril0b/DSCN0470.jpg?dl=0 I have seen welded tabs on roofs, like airplane spoilers, on commercial buildings. I guess they keep the snow from sliding off onto customers. Of course, that implies snow removal on the roofs. -- John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc picosecond timing precision measurement jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com http://www.highlandtechnology.com
On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:45:55 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/nonlin/sets/72157619114347064 > > The curved ones, on the second page, are mine.
We're seeing stuff like this: http://pixiescraftyworkshop.blogspot.com/2013/03/strange-happenings-in-snippets.html Cheers, James Arthur
On Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 4:44:51 PM UTC-5, dagmarg...@yahoo.com wrote:
> On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:45:55 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote: > > https://www.flickr.com/photos/nonlin/sets/72157619114347064 > > > > The curved ones, on the second page, are mine. > > We're seeing stuff like this: > http://pixiescraftyworkshop.blogspot.com/2013/03/strange-happenings-in-snippets.html > > Cheers, > James Arthur
That looks like it formed in the corner of the bird bath and was pushed upward as the surrounding water froze.
On Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 5:50:46 PM UTC-5, bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote:
> On Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 4:44:51 PM UTC-5, dagmarg...@yahoo.com wrote: > > On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:45:55 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote: > > > https://www.flickr.com/photos/nonlin/sets/72157619114347064 > > > > > > The curved ones, on the second page, are mine. > > > > We're seeing stuff like this: > > http://pixiescraftyworkshop.blogspot.com/2013/03/strange-happenings-in-snippets.html > > > > That looks like it formed in the corner of the bird bath and was pushed upward as the surrounding water froze.
Close. They're hollow, if that hint helps. Mostly seen in bird baths, under very specific conditions. Cheers, James Arthur
John Larkin wrote:

> On Thu, 5 Mar 2015 09:00:03 -0800 (PST), > bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote: > >>On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:45:55 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote: >>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/nonlin/sets/72157619114347064 >>> >>> The curved ones, on the second page, are mine. >> >>Looks like one heck of an ice dam problem. > > I don't know of any problems; it does sometimes get noisy in the > night, when tons of snow break loose and slide off the roof. The > building codes up here specify a snow load of 400 pounds per square > foot, and sometimes that's not enough. > > But I thought the icicle images were astounding. I still can't figure > out how this can happen.
Gotta be a wind. Water just won't flow sideways, or even UP, without something to push it. Was it windy there at some time? Jon
On Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 1:08:10 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
> On Thu, 5 Mar 2015 09:23:42 -0800 (PST), > bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote: > > >On Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 12:07:39 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote: > >> On Thu, 5 Mar 2015 09:00:03 -0800 (PST), > >> bloggs.fredbloggs.fred@gmail.com wrote: > >> > >> >On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:45:55 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote: > >> >> https://www.flickr.com/photos/nonlin/sets/72157619114347064 > >> >> > >> >> The curved ones, on the second page, are mine. > >> > > >> >Looks like one heck of an ice dam problem. > >> > >> I don't know of any problems; it does sometimes get noisy in the > >> night, when tons of snow break loose and slide off the roof. The > >> building codes up here specify a snow load of 400 pounds per square > >> foot, and sometimes that's not enough. > > > >400 Lbs??? That's kind of huge considering even Denver is only 90 psf. The problem with ice dams is not roof collapsing but water leakage. > > The problem up here, in big-snow years, is decks collapsing or being > ripped off the sides of houses.
That's ridiculous, it has to be substandard construction. The main reason for roof collapse is quite simply snow load exceeding the roof rating, but the roof easily handles 2x rating. The problem is usually the formation of drifts that causes roof accumulation far in excess of the design worst case snow fall. There were a bunch of roof collapses in the northeast blizzard zones this year, mostly the commercial flat roofs but quite a lot of cheaply built residential. The problem was the blizzards came in one right after the other before the first accumulation could melt off or be removed. These owners need to be more proactive and get that existing heavy snow load off their roof when they have a reliable forecast of a second blizzard coming their way. Usually things like strange sounds of wood creaking and nails popping is a giveaway that the structure is at its limit.
> > > > >https://www.disastersafety.org/freezing_weather/preventing-ice-dams-on-homes/ > > The roof is metal, and fairly steep, 45 degrees roughly, which is > typical up here. I don't see ice dams. We do get the cool slow creep > and curl effect, but the curls usually break before they touch the > house. We have seen the occasional curved icicle touch a window. > > In the winter of 2010-2011, we got 80 feet of snow on the Sierra > crest. There was a continuous curve of snow from the roof of our cabin > to our neighbor's. > > https://www.dropbox.com/s/qk0vlsven5ril0b/DSCN0470.jpg?dl=0 > > I have seen welded tabs on roofs, like airplane spoilers, on > commercial buildings. I guess they keep the snow from sliding off onto > customers. Of course, that implies snow removal on the roofs.
Way cheaper than the liability payout to even a single person injured by a big chunk of ice falling from height.
> > > -- > > John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc > picosecond timing precision measurement > > jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com > http://www.highlandtechnology.com
On Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 6:29:48 PM UTC-5, dagmarg...@yahoo.com wrote:
> On Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 5:50:46 PM UTC-5, bloggs.fred...@gmail.com wrote: > > On Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 4:44:51 PM UTC-5, dagmarg...@yahoo.com wrote: > > > On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:45:55 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote: > > > > https://www.flickr.com/photos/nonlin/sets/72157619114347064 > > > > > > > > The curved ones, on the second page, are mine. > > > > > > We're seeing stuff like this: > > > http://pixiescraftyworkshop.blogspot.com/2013/03/strange-happenings-in-snippets.html > > > > > > > That looks like it formed in the corner of the bird bath and was pushed upward as the surrounding water froze. > > Close. They're hollow, if that hint helps. Mostly seen in bird baths, > under very specific conditions.
The one in the picture looks solid to me. So yours are pyramidal but hollow? It doesn't cost much to drop a heater in that bird bath, birds don't use it for bathing much in winter, but they definitely use it as a drinking water source.
> > Cheers, > James Arthur