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laser used in metal 3D printer

Started by Jamie M November 17, 2014
Also check to see if the Co2 will run vertically before you buy it. Some cheap tubes do have a thermal gradient issue. Has to do with convective gas flow patterns in the tube.

I'll be shocked if you get good structural strength at 40 watts. 


Phil's numbers strike me as highly optimistic. I can barely cut thin steel shim stock  at 40 watts on a professional laser cutter, with assist gas. I would not even try to weld it.

Steve
Here is a detailed thesis on the matter

http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/378/1/uk_bl_ethos_400851.pdf

At lower laser powers a copper doped stainless steel powder is the material of choice. The copper aids in bonding the steel particles. This still needs fusing in a furnace.

Steve 
On 11/19/2014 6:15 PM, sroberts6328@gmail.com wrote:
> Also check to see if the Co2 will run vertically before you buy it. Some cheap tubes do have a thermal gradient issue. Has to
do with convective gas flow patterns in the tube.
> > I'll be shocked if you get good structural strength at 40 watts. > > > Phil's numbers strike me as highly optimistic. I can barely cut thin steel shim stock at 40 watts on a professional laser cutter,
with assist gas. I would not even try to weld it.
> > Steve
Hi, Thanks for the info about the thermal gradient issue, I guess this could cause overheating near the top of the tube.. Also what is your cutting beam diameter approx at 40watts? Do you ever have problems with metal splatter onto the optical components? Phil's example used a 50micron focus beam diameter, about 0.002", is your shim stock about that thickness too? What do you think you could cut without the assist gas? I think that thickness might be the high end of what powder thickness could be welded. I came up with a simple idea for a metal powder leveler that is just a fixed horizontal bar attached to the spindle/toolholder axis, and at a fixed height so that it always levels the metal powder to the exact height of laser beam focus, this way when the Z stage goes up to melt the next layer of metal, the levelling bar also goes up the same amount and levels the powder, which there is an excess pile of. cheers, Jamie
>
On 11/19/2014 6:58 PM, sroberts6328@gmail.com wrote:
> Here is a detailed thesis on the matter > > http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/378/1/uk_bl_ethos_400851.pdf > > At lower laser powers a copper doped stainless steel powder is the material of choice. The copper aids in bonding the steel particles.
This still needs fusing in a furnace.
> > Steve >
Thanks! :)
On 11/19/2014 6:58 PM, sroberts6328@gmail.com wrote:
> Here is a detailed thesis on the matter > > http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/378/1/uk_bl_ethos_400851.pdf > > At lower laser powers a copper doped stainless steel powder is the material of choice. The copper aids in bonding the steel particles.
This still needs fusing in a furnace.
> > Steve >
Hi, Have you ever come across a wire feed laser welder? I was thinking something like a MIG welder, but using a laser instead of the electrical arc. If the wire feed was small enough diameter something like this could be used for 3D printing too. cheers, Jamie
Den fredag den 21. november 2014 00.13.49 UTC+1 skrev Jamie M:
> On 11/19/2014 6:58 PM, sroberts6328@gmail.com wrote: > > Here is a detailed thesis on the matter > > > > http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/378/1/uk_bl_ethos_400851.pdf > > > > At lower laser powers a copper doped stainless steel powder is the material of choice. The copper aids in bonding the steel particles. > > This still needs fusing in a furnace. > > > > Steve > > > > Hi, > > Have you ever come across a wire feed laser welder? I was thinking > something like a MIG welder, but using a laser instead of the electrical > arc. If the wire feed was small enough diameter something like this > could be used for 3D printing too. > > cheers, > Jamie
http://youtu.be/b5Xi1LfeJdw -Lasse