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Is there an app which will stress TEST a cellphone battery?

Started by Ahmed E. Souaiaia April 26, 2014
Is there freeware which will expressly stress test a cellphone battery?

There are plenty of battery saver Android apps (e.g., Battery Doctor); 
but, is there a specific Android battery stress-test application?

My Samsung Galaxy SIII will last only about two hours with anything
useful running (e.g., GPS) and, with the battery hogs turned off
(mostly GPS but WiFi, Bluetooth, etc., are included), it will maybe
last three or slightly more hours.

What I want to do is run a battery stress test, basically to determine
the instantaneous amps rating, amp-hour rating, and charge characteristics.

Do you know of good freeware to stress test an Android battery?
Ahmed E. Souaiaia wrote, on Sat, 26 Apr 2014 19:57:16 -0500:

> Do you know of good freeware to stress test an Android battery?
I had first assumed there were no battery benchmarking apps becuase I had read this review of benchmarking apps, which flatly stated there are none for batteries: http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/3-apps-benchmark-smartphone-android/ Yet, while reading up further, I found this free app "appears" to be a battery benchmarking app, at least by the app description: Battery Benchmark, by MonacoDevDroid https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.batterybench But, it earned only 3 stars, which is oddly low. Looked at this one, Nova Battery Tester, by Nano Dynamics https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ru.NanoDinamics.NovaTester But, it also only earned just a bit over 3 stars. Off the Android store, there seems to be this benchmarking app, but, like the other two, the developer practically pleads with the users not to give it a bad review: Battery Benchmark, by App Brain http://www.appbrain.com/app/battery-benchmark/com.batterybench I'll try these three, but, do you know of a good 4 or 5 star Android battery stress-testing benchmarking tool?
Ahmed E. Souaiaia wrote, on Sat, 26 Apr 2014 20:06:04 -0500:

> Looked at this one, > Nova Battery Tester, by Nano Dynamics > https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ru.NanoDinamics.NovaTester > But, it also only earned just a bit over 3 stars.
Upon first use, I can see why this Nova Battery Tester by Nano Dynamics has such a bad set of user reviews. First off, it tells me to download the 'device characteristics' for my phone, which may be a reasonable request - yet - it knows nothing about the Samsung Galaxy SIII phone, which has to be one of the most common Android devices out there. So I'll try the other Google Play app (I didn't know how to install the non-Google-Play app).
On 27/04/2014 02:06, Ahmed E. Souaiaia wrote:
> Ahmed E. Souaiaia wrote, on Sat, 26 Apr 2014 19:57:16 -0500: > >> Do you know of good freeware to stress test an Android battery? > > I had first assumed there were no battery benchmarking apps > becuase I had read this review of benchmarking apps, which > flatly stated there are none for batteries: > http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/3-apps-benchmark-smartphone-android/ > > Yet, while reading up further, I found this free app "appears" to > be a battery benchmarking app, at least by the app description: > Battery Benchmark, by MonacoDevDroid > https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.batterybench > But, it earned only 3 stars, which is oddly low. > > Looked at this one, > Nova Battery Tester, by Nano Dynamics > https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ru.NanoDinamics.NovaTester > But, it also only earned just a bit over 3 stars. > > Off the Android store, there seems to be this benchmarking app, > but, like the other two, the developer practically pleads with > the users not to give it a bad review: > Battery Benchmark, by App Brain > http://www.appbrain.com/app/battery-benchmark/com.batterybench > > I'll try these three, but, do you know of a good 4 or 5 star > Android battery stress-testing benchmarking tool? >
No app is going to be able to tell if the fault is in the phone or the battery. The only definitive answer it to take the battery out and test it in a proper calibrated way. -- Brian Gregory (in the UK). To email me please remove all the letter vee from my email address.
Brian Gregory wrote, on Sun, 27 Apr 2014 02:28:25 +0100:

> The only definitive answer it to take the battery out and test it in a > proper calibrated way.
I would think that nearly impossible, for an average user such as I. I have a fluke meter, and I can dig up some resistors, but, the test jig alone would cost more than a new battery.
Brian Gregory wrote, on Sun, 27 Apr 2014 02:28:25 +0100:

> No app is going to be able to tell if the fault is in the phone or the > battery.
Why not?
On 27/04/2014 02:25, Ahmed E. Souaiaia wrote:
> Ahmed E. Souaiaia wrote, on Sat, 26 Apr 2014 20:06:04 -0500: > >> Looked at this one, >> Nova Battery Tester, by Nano Dynamics >> https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ru.NanoDinamics.NovaTester >> But, it also only earned just a bit over 3 stars. > > Upon first use, I can see why this Nova Battery Tester by Nano Dynamics > has such a bad set of user reviews. > > First off, it tells me to download the 'device characteristics' for my > phone, which may be a reasonable request - yet - it knows nothing about > the Samsung Galaxy SIII phone, which has to be one of the most common > Android devices out there. > > So I'll try the other Google Play app (I didn't know how to install > the non-Google-Play app). >
You'd be happier if it just silently download the info without telling you? You're rejecting it for being honest with you? -- Brian Gregory (in the UK). To email me please remove all the letter vee from my email address.
Pat Wilson <patwilson@example.com> wrote in news:ljhmnl$tdu$1@dont-email.me:

> Brian Gregory wrote, on Sun, 27 Apr 2014 02:28:25 +0100: > >> No app is going to be able to tell if the fault is in the phone or the >> battery. > > Why not?
If it does tell you anything, it's totally relying on the phone for the "diagnosis". How do you expect it to actually put a load on the battery from the USB port? All it can do is ask the phone to use the battery.. it doesn't have any real way to stress test your battery itself. -- Take it easy... Don't let the sound of your own wheels drive you crazy. Lighten up while you still can. Don't even try to understand. Just find a place to make your stand and take it easy!
On 27/04/2014 02:30, Ahmed E. Souaiaia wrote:
> Brian Gregory wrote, on Sun, 27 Apr 2014 02:28:25 +0100: > >> The only definitive answer it to take the battery out and test it in a >> proper calibrated way. > > I would think that nearly impossible, for an average user such as I. > > I have a fluke meter, and I can dig up some resistors, but, the > test jig alone would cost more than a new battery. >
Then just buy a new battery. I bought three for my Galaxy Note II. It's useful to have a spare for those long days away from a power socket. -- Brian Gregory (in the UK). To email me please remove all the letter vee from my email address.
"Ahmed E. Souaiaia" <AhmedESouaiaia@univ.iowa.edu> wrote in news:fbdd
$535c55ec$43da7656$26957@nntpswitch.blueworldhosting.com:

> Is there freeware which will expressly stress test a cellphone battery?
I don't know of any way you'd physically connect the battery to anything on the computer that would allow you to actually perform any sort of real stress test and take any readings in the process. Required hardware isn't present from the computers POV, regardless of software.
> There are plenty of battery saver Android apps (e.g., Battery Doctor); > but, is there a specific Android battery stress-test application?
These apps aren't doing anything with the battery directly. They have no direct control over the battery itself. They try to kill apps your phone is running to reduce the phones power consumption on the battery. That's how they "save" the battery power for you. No different than you going one by one and closing the same apps.
> My Samsung Galaxy SIII will last only about two hours with anything > useful running (e.g., GPS) and, with the battery hogs turned off > (mostly GPS but WiFi, Bluetooth, etc., are included), it will maybe > last three or slightly more hours.
How old is your phone? Has it always lasted about this long, or has it gotten noticeably shorter runtime between charges on you?
> What I want to do is run a battery stress test, basically to determine > the instantaneous amps rating, amp-hour rating, and charge > characteristics.
It can't be done from the computer without additional hardware to actually do the work. I doubt your phone has the additional load testing circuitry onboard nor a specific program to talk to said circuitry and pull the information you want here.
> Do you know of good freeware to stress test an Android battery?
Not only don't I know of any real ones, I know of no way they could possibly actually do what would be claimed. I'd be very leary of any software program that boasted being able to do this. Unless the program ran a battery conditioner. :) -- Take it easy... Don't let the sound of your own wheels drive you crazy. Lighten up while you still can. Don't even try to understand. Just find a place to make your stand and take it easy!