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Novel Zeitgeber devive for antique clock

Started by Unknown January 31, 2014
I have an antique clock which I have retrofitted with an oscillator circuit=
 to make it very accurate. I did not use a sensor, nor did I modify the clo=
ck's mechanism or its iron pendulum bob in any way. There is absolutely no =
circuit or sensor which measures the clock.

Yet it works. How did I do it? Any ideas?

(I think it's novel, but it is so obvious, I am open to hearing differently=
.)



On 01/31/2014 09:27 AM, haiticare2011@gmail.com wrote:
> I have an antique clock which I have retrofitted with an oscillator circuit to make it very accurate. I did not use a sensor, nor did I modify the clock's mechanism or its iron pendulum bob in any way. There is absolutely no circuit or sensor which measures the clock. > > Yet it works. How did I do it? Any ideas? > > (I think it's novel, but it is so obvious, I am open to hearing differently..) > > >
You mechanically injection-locked it, perhaps? Pendulum clocks will lock to each other if you put them close together on a wooden floor. Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 hobbs at electrooptical dot net http://electrooptical.net
On Friday, January 31, 2014 9:59:57 AM UTC-5, Phil Hobbs wrote:
> On 01/31/2014 09:27 AM, hicare2011@gmail.com wrote: >=20 > > I have an antique clock which I have retrofitted with an oscillator cir=
cuit to make it very accurate. I did not use a sensor, nor did I modify the= clock's mechanism or its iron pendulum bob in any way. There is absolutely= no circuit or sensor which measures the clock.
>=20 > > >=20 > > Yet it works. How did I do it? Any ideas? >=20 > > >=20 > > (I think it's novel, but it is so obvious, I am open to hearing differe=
ntly..)
>=20 > > >=20 > > >=20 > > >=20 >=20 >=20 > You mechanically injection-locked it, perhaps? Pendulum clocks will=20 >=20 > lock to each other if you put them close together on a wooden floor. >=20 >=20 >=20 > Cheers >=20 >=20 >=20 > Phil Hobbs >=20 >=20 >=20 > --=20 >=20 > Dr Philip C D Hobbs >=20 > Principal Consultant >=20 > ElectroOptical Innovations LLC >=20 > Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics >=20 >=20 >=20 > 160 North State Road #203 >=20 > Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 >=20 >=20 >=20 > hobbs at electrooptical dot net >=20 > http://electrooptical.net
That's close...
On Fri, 31 Jan 2014 09:59:57 -0500, Phil Hobbs
<pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

>On 01/31/2014 09:27 AM, haiticare2011@gmail.com wrote: >> I have an antique clock which I have retrofitted with an oscillator circuit to make it very accurate. I did not use a sensor, nor did I modify the clock's mechanism or its iron pendulum bob in any way. There is absolutely no circuit or sensor which measures the clock. >> >> Yet it works. How did I do it? Any ideas? >> >> (I think it's novel, but it is so obvious, I am open to hearing differently..) >> >> >> > >You mechanically injection-locked it, perhaps? Pendulum clocks will >lock to each other if you put them close together on a wooden floor. > >Cheers > >Phil Hobbs
A coil below the pendulum, pulsed properly, would work. It should lock to a coil driven from 60 Hz (resistor+diode from AC line) and it might not even need the diode. Injection locking is fun. I think James has a patent or two. -- John Larkin Highland Technology Inc www.highlandtechnology.com jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com Precision electronic instrumentation
On 31/01/2014 14:27, haiticare2011@gmail.com wrote:
> I have an antique clock which I have retrofitted with an oscillator circuit to make it very accurate. I did not use a sensor, nor did I modify the clock's mechanism or its iron pendulum bob in any way. There is absolutely no circuit or sensor which measures the clock. > > Yet it works. How did I do it? Any ideas?
Parametric entrainment with a magnetic coil at the bottom of the swing driven from a crystal at twice the natural swing of the pendulum but crystal controlled. The pendulum will phase lock to the energy source and only a modest drive needed.
> > (I think it's novel, but it is so obvious, I am open to hearing differently.)
There is a variant of this that can be used to do the Indian rope trick with a broomhandle. -- Regards, Martin Brown
On Fri, 31 Jan 2014 07:11:26 -0800 (PST), haiticare2011@gmail.com wrote:

>On Friday, January 31, 2014 9:59:57 AM UTC-5, Phil Hobbs wrote: >> On 01/31/2014 09:27 AM, hicare2011@gmail.com wrote: >> >> > I have an antique clock which I have retrofitted with an oscillator circuit to make it very accurate. I did not use a sensor, nor did I modify the clock's mechanism or its iron pendulum bob in any way. There is absolutely no circuit or sensor which measures the clock. >> >> > >> >> > Yet it works. How did I do it? Any ideas? >> >> > >> >> > (I think it's novel, but it is so obvious, I am open to hearing differently..) >> >> > >> >> > >> >> > >> >> >> >> You mechanically injection-locked it, perhaps? Pendulum clocks will >> >> lock to each other if you put them close together on a wooden floor. >> >> >> >> Cheers >> >> >> >> Phil Hobbs >> >> >> >> -- >> >> Dr Philip C D Hobbs >> >> Principal Consultant >> >> ElectroOptical Innovations LLC >> >> Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics >> >> >> >> 160 North State Road #203 >> >> Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 >> >> >> >> hobbs at electrooptical dot net >> >> http://electrooptical.net > >That's close...
You are being a PITA. You're probably a nym of Jim Thompson. It's been done for decades. googling this will produce thousands of hits. -- John Larkin Highland Technology Inc www.highlandtechnology.com jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com Precision electronic instrumentation
On Friday, January 31, 2014 10:19:30 AM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
> On Fri, 31 Jan 2014 09:59:57 -0500, Phil Hobbs >=20 > <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote: >=20 >=20 >=20 > >On 01/31/2014 09:27 AM, haiticare201@gmail.com wrote: >=20 > >> I have an antique clock which I have retrofitted with an oscillator ci=
rcuit to make it very accurate. I did not use a sensor, nor did I modify th= e clock's mechanism or its iron pendulum bob in any way. There is absolutel= y no circuit or sensor which measures the clock.
>=20 > >> >=20 > >> Yet it works. How did I do it? Any ideas? >=20 > >> >=20 > >> (I think it's novel, but it is so obvious, I am open to hearing differ=
ently..)
>=20 > >> >=20 > >> >=20 > >> >=20 > > >=20 > >You mechanically injection-locked it, perhaps? Pendulum clocks will=20 >=20 > >lock to each other if you put them close together on a wooden floor. >=20 > > >=20 > >Cheers >=20 > > >=20 > >Phil Hobbs >=20 >=20 >=20 > A coil below the pendulum, pulsed properly, would work. >=20 >=20 >=20 > It should lock to a coil driven from 60 Hz (resistor+diode from AC line) =
and it
>=20 > might not even need the diode. >=20 >=20 >=20 > Injection locking is fun. I think James has a patent or two. >=20 >=20 >=20 >=20 >=20 > --=20 >=20 >=20 >=20 > John Larkin Highland Technology Inc >=20 > www.highlandtechnology.com jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com =20 >=20 >=20 >=20 > Precision electronic instrumentation
yes, that's it. The hint about the iron bob was that the electromagnet was = involved. jb
On Friday, January 31, 2014 10:24:13 AM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
> On Fri, 31 Jan 2014 07:11:26 -0800 (PST), haicare2011@gmail.com wrote: >=20 >=20 >=20 > >On Friday, January 31, 2014 9:59:57 AM UTC-5, Phil Hobbs wrote: >=20 > >> On 01/31/2014 09:27 AM, hicare2011@gmail.com wrote: >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> > I have an antique clock which I have retrofitted with an oscillator =
circuit to make it very accurate. I did not use a sensor, nor did I modify = the clock's mechanism or its iron pendulum bob in any way. There is absolut= ely no circuit or sensor which measures the clock.
>=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> > >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> > Yet it works. How did I do it? Any ideas? >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> > >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> > (I think it's novel, but it is so obvious, I am open to hearing diff=
erently..)
>=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> > >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> > >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> > >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> You mechanically injection-locked it, perhaps? Pendulum clocks will=
=20
>=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> lock to each other if you put them close together on a wooden floor. >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> Cheers >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> Phil Hobbs >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> --=20 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> Dr Philip C D Hobbs >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> Principal Consultant >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> ElectroOptical Innovations LLC >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> 160 North State Road #203 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> hobbs at electrooptical dot net >=20 > >>=20 >=20 > >> http://electrooptical.net >=20 > > >=20 > >That's close... >=20 >=20 >=20 > You are being a PITA. You're probably a nym of Jim Thompson. >=20 >=20 >=20 > It's been done for decades. googling this will produce thousands of hits. >=20 >=20 >=20 >=20 >=20 > --=20 >=20 >=20 >=20 > John Larkin Highland Technology Inc >=20 > www.highlandtechnology.com jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com =20 >=20 >=20 >=20 > Precision electronic instrumentation
OK my apologies.=20 I have seen various sensor systems, but not this. Ever seen those wind mill= s on towers turning in synchrony? Wonder how that happens?
On 01/31/2014 10:19 AM, John Larkin wrote:
> On Fri, 31 Jan 2014 09:59:57 -0500, Phil Hobbs > <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote: > >> On 01/31/2014 09:27 AM, haiticare2011@gmail.com wrote: >>> I have an antique clock which I have retrofitted with an oscillator circuit to make it very accurate. I did not use a sensor, nor did I modify the clock's mechanism or its iron pendulum bob in any way. There is absolutely no circuit or sensor which measures the clock. >>> >>> Yet it works. How did I do it? Any ideas? >>> >>> (I think it's novel, but it is so obvious, I am open to hearing differently..) >>> >>> >>> >> >> You mechanically injection-locked it, perhaps? Pendulum clocks will >> lock to each other if you put them close together on a wooden floor. >> >> Cheers >> >> Phil Hobbs > > A coil below the pendulum, pulsed properly, would work.
That's been done a lot, as you say. Of course it has a dead zone right around lock, so the phase noise would be horrible. ;) (You just have to put it slightly off center.)
> > It should lock to a coil driven from 60 Hz (resistor+diode from AC line) and it > might not even need the diode.
That's a fun possibility. I wonder how close to 1 Hz it would have to be in order to lock. The locking time would be pretty long, I expect. Using a vibrator motor or something like that, you could probably make an aftermarket injection locker for pendulum clocks that would require zero mods to the clock. (I can just see an Android app for that. Probably possible in some instances.) ;) Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 hobbs at electrooptical dot net http://electrooptical.net
On Friday, January 31, 2014 7:24:33 AM UTC-8, haitic...@gmail.com wrote:
[about locking a pendulum to an electronic source]
> yes, that's it. The hint about the iron bob was that the electromagnet was involved.
There's a nice (expired) patent on this (US patent 3783550), and a cute little toy called "Top Secret" based on the same principle, but with added obfuscation...