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reverse biased diode variable resistance experiment

Started by Jamie M December 2, 2013
Hi,

This is related to the "poor mans superconductor wire" thread,
for testing an idea of anomalous resistance decrease in a diode.

If you reverse bias a diode, then electrons move closer to the
junction of the diode as the voltage pressure increases.  I was
thinking maybe this biasing of the electric field will change the
electrical resistance on each side of the diode.  Ie. if the actual
diode IC die is available to probe, reverse bias the diode, and then
put two probes on one side of the diode and measure the resistance
from two points on the anode-anode or cathode-cathode and see if the
resistance changes based on the level of reverse bias.  Any ideas?

I was thinking about this in the case of topological insulators,
where with an infinite voltage breakdown diode, eventually it will
act as a topological insulator in this case and may then act as a
superconductor in this case.

cheers,
Jamie
In article <l7j0u1$bmh$1@speranza.aioe.org>, jmorken@shaw.ca says...
> > Hi, > > This is related to the "poor mans superconductor wire" thread, > for testing an idea of anomalous resistance decrease in a diode. > > If you reverse bias a diode, then electrons move closer to the > junction of the diode as the voltage pressure increases. I was > thinking maybe this biasing of the electric field will change the > electrical resistance on each side of the diode. Ie. if the actual > diode IC die is available to probe, reverse bias the diode, and then > put two probes on one side of the diode and measure the resistance > from two points on the anode-anode or cathode-cathode and see if the > resistance changes based on the level of reverse bias. Any ideas?
Yeah, they call it a zener diode!
In article <l7j0u1$bmh$1@speranza.aioe.org>, Jamie M <jmorken@shaw.ca> 
wrote:

> Hi, > > This is related to the "poor mans superconductor wire" thread, > for testing an idea of anomalous resistance decrease in a diode. > > If you reverse bias a diode, then electrons move closer to the > junction of the diode as the voltage pressure increases. I was > thinking maybe this biasing of the electric field will change the > electrical resistance on each side of the diode. Ie. if the actual > diode IC die is available to probe, reverse bias the diode, and then > put two probes on one side of the diode and measure the resistance > from two points on the anode-anode or cathode-cathode and see if the > resistance changes based on the level of reverse bias. Any ideas? > > I was thinking about this in the case of topological insulators, > where with an infinite voltage breakdown diode, eventually it will > act as a topological insulator in this case and may then act as a > superconductor in this case.
Jamie- The effect of changing a diode's reverse bias results in junction capacitance changing. One Varicap data sheet I checked shows lowering capacitance as Voltage increases. I believe the electrons move away from the junction as reverse Voltage increases. What you describe sounds like an inside-out field effect transistor. I can imagine there might be some variation in resistance, but why do you think it would be superconductive? One problem is that you may not be able to probe such a small area. You would need to design a device with molecular-sized electrodes. To use the resistance, current must flow, and some of that current might be "injected" into the junction. Now it is sounding like an SCR! Fred
On Mon, 02 Dec 2013 14:17:41 -0800, Jamie M wrote:

> Hi, > > This is related to the "poor mans superconductor wire" thread, for > testing an idea of anomalous resistance decrease in a diode. > > If you reverse bias a diode, then electrons move closer to the junction > of the diode as the voltage pressure increases.
You may want to read some more about how PN junctions work. The depletion region _widens_ with increased reverse bias potential.
Jamie M wrote:
> Hi, > > This is related to the "poor mans superconductor wire" thread, > for testing an idea of anomalous resistance decrease in a diode. > > If you reverse bias a diode, then electrons move closer to the > junction of the diode as the voltage pressure increases. I was > thinking maybe this biasing of the electric field will change the > electrical resistance on each side of the diode. Ie. if the actual > diode IC die is available to probe, reverse bias the diode, and then > put two probes on one side of the diode and measure the resistance > from two points on the anode-anode or cathode-cathode and see if the > resistance changes based on the level of reverse bias. Any ideas?
* See Chapter 7, Transistors and Active Circuits by J. G. Linvill and J. F. Gibbons, MgGraw Hill 1961, especially pp158-173.
> > I was thinking about this in the case of topological insulators, > where with an infinite voltage breakdown diode, eventually it will > act as a topological insulator in this case and may then act as a > superconductor in this case.
* Perhaps you better read the whole book.
> > cheers, > Jamie
Jamie M wrote:
> Hi, > > This is related to the "poor mans superconductor wire" thread, > for testing an idea of anomalous resistance decrease in a diode. > > If you reverse bias a diode, then electrons move closer to the > junction of the diode as the voltage pressure increases. I was > thinking maybe this biasing of the electric field will change the > electrical resistance on each side of the diode. Ie. if the actual > diode IC die is available to probe, reverse bias the diode, and then > put two probes on one side of the diode and measure the resistance > from two points on the anode-anode or cathode-cathode and see if the > resistance changes based on the level of reverse bias. Any ideas? > > I was thinking about this in the case of topological insulators, > where with an infinite voltage breakdown diode, eventually it will > act as a topological insulator in this case and may then act as a > superconductor in this case. > > cheers, > Jamie
This variable resistance (of a zener diode) was used as a crude high voltage shunt regulator for PMTs. One manufacturer (Comprobe) of oil well logging sondes utilized conventional silicon diodes as high voltage regulator devices. The diodes had to be selected for appropriate reverse leakage characteristics, a time consuming process resulting in a low yield of usable devices. The leaky diode high voltage regulator was unreliable and extremely temperature unstable, and its use was long ago discontinued.
On 12/2/2013 8:21 PM, Robert Baer wrote:
> Jamie M wrote: >> Hi, >> >> This is related to the "poor mans superconductor wire" thread, >> for testing an idea of anomalous resistance decrease in a diode. >> >> If you reverse bias a diode, then electrons move closer to the >> junction of the diode as the voltage pressure increases. I was >> thinking maybe this biasing of the electric field will change the >> electrical resistance on each side of the diode. Ie. if the actual >> diode IC die is available to probe, reverse bias the diode, and then >> put two probes on one side of the diode and measure the resistance >> from two points on the anode-anode or cathode-cathode and see if the >> resistance changes based on the level of reverse bias. Any ideas? >> >> I was thinking about this in the case of topological insulators, >> where with an infinite voltage breakdown diode, eventually it will >> act as a topological insulator in this case and may then act as a >> superconductor in this case. >> >> cheers, >> Jamie > This variable resistance (of a zener diode) was used as a crude high > voltage shunt regulator for PMTs. > One manufacturer (Comprobe) of oil well logging sondes utilized > conventional silicon diodes as high voltage regulator devices. The > diodes had to be selected for appropriate reverse leakage > characteristics, a time consuming process resulting in a low yield of > usable devices. The leaky diode high voltage regulator was unreliable > and extremely temperature unstable, and its use was long ago discontinued. >
Hi, I meant a variable resistance from one section of the anode to another section of the anode, (or one section of the cathode to another section of the cathode) - but not a variable resistance across the junction. I should study more before I post though you are right (thanks!) cheers, Jamie
Le Mon, 02 Dec 2013 20:44:04 -0800, Jamie M a &eacute;crit:

> On 12/2/2013 8:21 PM, Robert Baer wrote: >> Jamie M wrote: >>> Hi, >>> >>> This is related to the "poor mans superconductor wire" thread, >>> for testing an idea of anomalous resistance decrease in a diode. >>> >>> If you reverse bias a diode, then electrons move closer to the >>> junction of the diode as the voltage pressure increases. I was >>> thinking maybe this biasing of the electric field will change the >>> electrical resistance on each side of the diode. Ie. if the actual >>> diode IC die is available to probe, reverse bias the diode, and then >>> put two probes on one side of the diode and measure the resistance >>> from two points on the anode-anode or cathode-cathode and see if the >>> resistance changes based on the level of reverse bias. Any ideas? >>> >>> I was thinking about this in the case of topological insulators, where >>> with an infinite voltage breakdown diode, eventually it will act as a >>> topological insulator in this case and may then act as a >>> superconductor in this case. >>> >>> cheers, >>> Jamie >> This variable resistance (of a zener diode) was used as a crude high >> voltage shunt regulator for PMTs. >> One manufacturer (Comprobe) of oil well logging sondes utilized >> conventional silicon diodes as high voltage regulator devices. The >> diodes had to be selected for appropriate reverse leakage >> characteristics, a time consuming process resulting in a low yield of >> usable devices. The leaky diode high voltage regulator was unreliable >> and extremely temperature unstable, and its use was long ago >> discontinued. >> >> > > Hi, > > I meant a variable resistance from one section of the anode to another > section of the anode, (or one section of the cathode to another section > of the cathode) - but not a variable resistance across the junction. > > I should study more before I post though you are right (thanks!) >
Ever been in this world since the 5 past decades? What you describe is nothing but what earth inhabitants call a JFET. -- Thanks, Fred.
On 12/3/2013 7:07 AM, Fred Bartoli wrote:
> Le Mon, 02 Dec 2013 20:44:04 -0800, Jamie M a &eacute;crit: > >> On 12/2/2013 8:21 PM, Robert Baer wrote: >>> Jamie M wrote: >>>> Hi, >>>> >>>> This is related to the "poor mans superconductor wire" thread, >>>> for testing an idea of anomalous resistance decrease in a diode. >>>> >>>> If you reverse bias a diode, then electrons move closer to the >>>> junction of the diode as the voltage pressure increases. I was >>>> thinking maybe this biasing of the electric field will change the >>>> electrical resistance on each side of the diode. Ie. if the actual >>>> diode IC die is available to probe, reverse bias the diode, and then >>>> put two probes on one side of the diode and measure the resistance >>>> from two points on the anode-anode or cathode-cathode and see if the >>>> resistance changes based on the level of reverse bias. Any ideas? >>>> >>>> I was thinking about this in the case of topological insulators, where >>>> with an infinite voltage breakdown diode, eventually it will act as a >>>> topological insulator in this case and may then act as a >>>> superconductor in this case. >>>> >>>> cheers, >>>> Jamie >>> This variable resistance (of a zener diode) was used as a crude high >>> voltage shunt regulator for PMTs. >>> One manufacturer (Comprobe) of oil well logging sondes utilized >>> conventional silicon diodes as high voltage regulator devices. The >>> diodes had to be selected for appropriate reverse leakage >>> characteristics, a time consuming process resulting in a low yield of >>> usable devices. The leaky diode high voltage regulator was unreliable >>> and extremely temperature unstable, and its use was long ago >>> discontinued. >>> >>> >> >> Hi, >> >> I meant a variable resistance from one section of the anode to another >> section of the anode, (or one section of the cathode to another section >> of the cathode) - but not a variable resistance across the junction. >> >> I should study more before I post though you are right (thanks!) >> > > Ever been in this world since the 5 past decades? > > What you describe is nothing but what earth inhabitants call a JFET.
Cool didn't know you can actually use a diode as a JFET (as long as you have access to the die to put on another wire) cheers, Jamie
> > >
On 12/3/2013 7:07 AM, Fred Bartoli wrote:
> Le Mon, 02 Dec 2013 20:44:04 -0800, Jamie M a &eacute;crit: > >> On 12/2/2013 8:21 PM, Robert Baer wrote: >>> Jamie M wrote: >>>> Hi, >>>> >>>> This is related to the "poor mans superconductor wire" thread, >>>> for testing an idea of anomalous resistance decrease in a diode. >>>> >>>> If you reverse bias a diode, then electrons move closer to the >>>> junction of the diode as the voltage pressure increases. I was >>>> thinking maybe this biasing of the electric field will change the >>>> electrical resistance on each side of the diode. Ie. if the actual >>>> diode IC die is available to probe, reverse bias the diode, and then >>>> put two probes on one side of the diode and measure the resistance >>>> from two points on the anode-anode or cathode-cathode and see if the >>>> resistance changes based on the level of reverse bias. Any ideas? >>>> >>>> I was thinking about this in the case of topological insulators, where >>>> with an infinite voltage breakdown diode, eventually it will act as a >>>> topological insulator in this case and may then act as a >>>> superconductor in this case. >>>> >>>> cheers, >>>> Jamie >>> This variable resistance (of a zener diode) was used as a crude high >>> voltage shunt regulator for PMTs. >>> One manufacturer (Comprobe) of oil well logging sondes utilized >>> conventional silicon diodes as high voltage regulator devices. The >>> diodes had to be selected for appropriate reverse leakage >>> characteristics, a time consuming process resulting in a low yield of >>> usable devices. The leaky diode high voltage regulator was unreliable >>> and extremely temperature unstable, and its use was long ago >>> discontinued. >>> >>> >> >> Hi, >> >> I meant a variable resistance from one section of the anode to another >> section of the anode, (or one section of the cathode to another section >> of the cathode) - but not a variable resistance across the junction. >> >> I should study more before I post though you are right (thanks!) >> > > Ever been in this world since the 5 past decades? > > What you describe is nothing but what earth inhabitants call a JFET.
Hi, I was interested in a theoretical superconducting JFET, ie one that doesn't quite fully shut off the current flow, but leaves a surface flow of electrons like a topological insulator for zero resistance flow. cheers, Jamie
> > >