Forums

Barrel connectors

Started by Don Y November 15, 2013
Hi,

They're everywhere!

And, often CRAP!

Any guidelines on selection criteria? Any worries about failure modes?

Do the "inverse" variety (now popular on laptops, LCD's, etc.) offer
any special advantages over the traditional style?

Thx,
  --don
On 11/14/2013 11:47 PM, Don Y wrote:
> Hi, > > They're everywhere! > > And, often CRAP! > > Any guidelines on selection criteria? Any worries about failure modes? > > Do the "inverse" variety (now popular on laptops, LCD's, etc.) offer > any special advantages over the traditional style? > > Thx, > --don
Do you mean coaxial power plugs, or RF connectors with females on both sides? If you are building custom gear and you meant a DC coaxial connector, use a Cannon XLR connector for power. There are 4 pin connectors if you want to be official. Use a 3 pin if you are the only person using the gear. The 4 pin version is to avoid people not knowing what they are doing plugging in the wrong gear. Four pin XLR is used in ENG, but then it also found its way into some custom audio.
miso wrote:

> On 11/14/2013 11:47 PM, Don Y wrote: >> Hi, >> >> They're everywhere! >> >> And, often CRAP! >> >> Any guidelines on selection criteria? Any worries about failure modes? >> >> Do the "inverse" variety (now popular on laptops, LCD's, etc.) offer >> any special advantages over the traditional style? >> >> Thx, >> --don > > Do you mean coaxial power plugs, or RF connectors with females on both > sides? > > If you are building custom gear and you meant a DC coaxial connector, > use a Cannon XLR connector for power. There are 4 pin connectors if you > want to be official. Use a 3 pin if you are the only person using the > gear. The 4 pin version is to avoid people not knowing what they are > doing plugging in the wrong gear. > > Four pin XLR is used in ENG, but then it also found its way into some > custom audio.
I have used the Neutrik XLR range (5 and 6 pin) for some industrial control applications. Excellent connector for localised quick connect-disconnect and very robust in all the formats. -- ******************************************************************** Paul E. Bennett IEng MIET.....<email://Paul_E.Bennett@topmail.co.uk> Forth based HIDECS Consultancy.............<http://www.hidecs.co.uk> Mob: +44 (0)7811-639972 Tel: +44 (0)1235-510979 Going Forth Safely ..... EBA. www.electric-boat-association.org.uk.. ********************************************************************
"miso"


** FOAD  you  STINKING   NUT  CASE  TROLL

     Never post here again.

     Or this NG will be sabotaged.



On 11/15/2013 3:04 AM, Paul E Bennett wrote:
> Cannon XLR connector
Digikey has these at $20 a pair ( one male/one female ) !!!!! Just for power ?!?!
On 11/15/2013 12:56 AM, miso wrote:
> On 11/14/2013 11:47 PM, Don Y wrote: >> Hi, >> >> They're everywhere! >> >> And, often CRAP! >> >> Any guidelines on selection criteria? Any worries about failure modes? >> >> Do the "inverse" variety (now popular on laptops, LCD's, etc.) offer >> any special advantages over the traditional style? >> >> Thx, >> --don > > Do you mean coaxial power plugs, or RF connectors with females on both > sides?
power plugs. sorry, i thought that would have been obvious from my derogatory references! :>
> If you are building custom gear and you meant a DC coaxial connector, > use a Cannon XLR connector for power. There are 4 pin connectors if you > want to be official. Use a 3 pin if you are the only person using the > gear. The 4 pin version is to avoid people not knowing what they are > doing plugging in the wrong gear. > > Four pin XLR is used in ENG, but then it also found its way into some > custom audio.
Huh??? like the sort used on microphones? WAY too big and far heavier than needed. Thknk of the sorts of places you see "barrel connectors" and imagine one of yours in that same application...
>
On 11/15/2013 9:11 AM, hamilton wrote:
> On 11/15/2013 3:04 AM, Paul E Bennett wrote: >> Cannon XLR connector > > Digikey has these at $20 a pair ( one male/one female ) !!!!! > > Just for power ?!?!
May be *excellent* for power -- ignoring other considerations! :( But, you see barrel connectors *everywhere*. No doubt because they are small, inexpensive and "adequate" (even if only barely so). Ignoring the plethora of different ID/OD combinations (along with polarity), my question is why a particular "style" is used (or avoided). E.g., obviously a smaller body is used in cases where there is less available room. Larger ID for higher current capacities? Or, just to make "yours" different that "the next guy's"? Longer barrels often to overcome "too much plastic" in the fabrication of the employing device's case (so, the mate is "too far recessed"). But, why the appearance of these "inverse" variants? Is there a mechanical advantage? Electrical? Or, just more variety for the sake of variety??
On 11/15/2013 1:40 PM, Don Y wrote:
Grrr... I'm seeing lots of duplicate posts (of mine).  I
suspect my server is having issues  :<  Sorry!


On Fri, 15 Nov 2013 09:11:42 -0700, hamilton <hamilton@nothere.com>
wrote:

>On 11/15/2013 3:04 AM, Paul E Bennett wrote: >> Cannon XLR connector > >Digikey has these at $20 a pair ( one male/one female ) !!!!!
In *any* quantity, the cable mounted ends should be around $6. The panel or board mounted connectors are cheaper. DigiKey charges big money for one of anything, which is quite reasonable.
>Just for power ?!?!
Why not? It's a great connector. It's too bad there aren't more configurations.
"Don Y"

> They're everywhere! > > And, often CRAP! > > Any guidelines on selection criteria? Any worries about failure modes? > > Do the "inverse" variety (now popular on laptops, LCD's, etc.) offer > any special advantages over the traditional style?
** The term "barrel connector" must be an Americanism - cos I have never heard it before. It alludes to resemblance of the male connector to a gun barrel - right ? How pathetic. ... Phil