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Inductor current can't be suddenly cutoff if no freewheel diode is attached

Started by Patrick Chung September 2, 2013
Jim Thompson <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote:
> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 18:37:56 -0700, John Larkin > <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: > >> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 17:59:21 -0700, Jim Thompson >> <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >> >>> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 12:25:05 -0700, John Larkin >>> <jlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote: >>> >>>> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 11:28:30 -0700, Jim Thompson >>>> <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >>>> >>>>> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 11:21:01 -0700, John Larkin >>>>> <jlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote: >>>>> >>>>>> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 11:04:09 -0700, Jim Thompson >>>>>> <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >>>>>> >>>>>>> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 10:57:19 -0700, John Larkin >>>>>>> <jlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote: >>>>>>> >>>>>>>> On Wed, 04 Sep 2013 20:57:37 -0800, Robert Baer >>>>>>>> <robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote: >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>> Jim Thompson wrote: >>>>>>>>>> On Tue, 03 Sep 2013 12:01:57 +1000, Sylvia Else >>>>>>>>>> <sylvia@not.at.this.address> wrote: >>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>> On 3/09/2013 4:44 AM, Jim Thompson wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>> On Mon, 02 Sep 2013 10:43:09 -0700, Robert Baer >>>>>>>>>>>> <robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> Patrick Chung wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Inductor current can't be suddenly cutoff if no freewheel >>>>>>>>>>>>>> diode is attached. New tutorial is ready >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> http://www.cirvirlab.com/index.php/tutorials/105-r-l-circuit-with-mosfet-as-switch-and-freewheel-diode.html >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> and online simulation >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> http://www.cirvirlab.com/simulation/r-l_circuit_with_mosfet_as_switch_and_freewheel_diode.php >>>>>>>>>>>>> NOT true! >>>>>>>>>>>>> Look a ten million or so car ignition systems since the late 1800's. >>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> Depends on your definition of "suddenly">:-} >>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> ...Jim Thompson >>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>> Or indeed, on your definition of cut off. >>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>> Sylvia. >>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> Oh, please! Oh, please! Don't cut it off>:-} >>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> ...Jim Thompson >>>>>>>>> Will there be a song now "Do the Bobbit? >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>> It's interesting that, whenever a woman posts here, there are guys, >>>>>>>> presumably either horny teenagers or senile old gits, who start up >>>>>>>> snarky sexual innuendo. They're not even very good at it. >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>> See the same thing in s.e.b. >>>>>>> >>>>>>> Designed any "cute" circuits lately ?:-) >>>>>>> >>>>>>> ...Jim Thompson >>>>>> >>>>>> https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Optos/D140_and_Fixture.jpg >>>>>> >>>>>> The big board is the test fixture. The little board (I think 0.75x2" >>>>>> qualifies as "cute") is a 150+ amp, 4ish kilowatt precision laser >>>>>> driver, with onboard boost-doubler converter. The one that you didn't >>>>>> like. >>>>>> >>>>>> https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Optos/D140_200A_Pulse.JPG >>>>>> >>>>>> The Brat did beautiful PCB layouts on these. They both worked first >>>>>> time. The customer connected +10 to the 5 volt supply and blew up the >>>>>> first one that we shipped, but these things happen. >>>>>> >>>>>> Currently I'm working on an active magnetic field shield, an aircraft >>>>>> engine transducer simulator, some thermal stuff for an EUV photodiode >>>>>> digitizer, and some optical stuff having to do with semiconductor fab. >>>>>> And still tweaking my shrimp-and-grits and bread pudding recipes. >>>>>> >>>>>> How about you? Still working? >>>>> >>>>> Yep. Still cranking out custom chips. >>>>> >>>>> Will you show us the final schematic of the boost-doubler? As >>>>> originally posted it _did_ have problems. >>>>> >>>>> ...Jim Thompson >>>> >>>> What problems? >>>> >>>> This is essentially the same as the "bubbler" circuit I posted >>>> previously. Here's the (censored) schematic of the real thing: >>>> >>>> https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Circuits/Power/Boost-Doubler.pdf >>>> >>>> It's tiny and it works great. It's simple, efficient, and very >>>> tunable. The current pulled from the customer's supply, during >>>> chargeup or recharge, is nearly flat and is easily settable. >>> >>> Bwahahahahahaha! What did I expect ?>:-} >>> >>> ...Jim Thompson >> >> I expect to sell several thousand of them. > > How much crap you sell is immaterial. > > You're supposed to "educate" us. Bwahahahahahahahaha! > > ...Jim Thompson
No, I believe his mandate actually is "to sell stuff and make money". Educating us is a sideline, and I would be surprised if your priorities were any different.
On Sat, 07 Sep 2013 01:38:36 GMT, Ralph Barone <address_is@invalid.invalid>
wrote:

>Jim Thompson <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 18:37:56 -0700, John Larkin >> <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote: >> >>> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 17:59:21 -0700, Jim Thompson >>> <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >>> >>>> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 12:25:05 -0700, John Larkin >>>> <jlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote: >>>> >>>>> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 11:28:30 -0700, Jim Thompson >>>>> <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >>>>> >>>>>> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 11:21:01 -0700, John Larkin >>>>>> <jlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote: >>>>>> >>>>>>> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 11:04:09 -0700, Jim Thompson >>>>>>> <To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon@On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote: >>>>>>> >>>>>>>> On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 10:57:19 -0700, John Larkin >>>>>>>> <jlarkin@highlandtechnology.com> wrote: >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>> On Wed, 04 Sep 2013 20:57:37 -0800, Robert Baer >>>>>>>>> <robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote: >>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> Jim Thompson wrote: >>>>>>>>>>> On Tue, 03 Sep 2013 12:01:57 +1000, Sylvia Else >>>>>>>>>>> <sylvia@not.at.this.address> wrote: >>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> On 3/09/2013 4:44 AM, Jim Thompson wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>> On Mon, 02 Sep 2013 10:43:09 -0700, Robert Baer >>>>>>>>>>>>> <robertbaer@localnet.com> wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Patrick Chung wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Inductor current can't be suddenly cutoff if no freewheel >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> diode is attached. New tutorial is ready >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> http://www.cirvirlab.com/index.php/tutorials/105-r-l-circuit-with-mosfet-as-switch-and-freewheel-diode.html >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> and online simulation >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> http://www.cirvirlab.com/simulation/r-l_circuit_with_mosfet_as_switch_and_freewheel_diode.php >>>>>>>>>>>>>> NOT true! >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Look a ten million or so car ignition systems since the late 1800's. >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> Depends on your definition of "suddenly">:-} >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> ...Jim Thompson >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> Or indeed, on your definition of cut off. >>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> Sylvia. >>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>> Oh, please! Oh, please! Don't cut it off>:-} >>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>> ...Jim Thompson >>>>>>>>>> Will there be a song now "Do the Bobbit? >>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>> It's interesting that, whenever a woman posts here, there are guys, >>>>>>>>> presumably either horny teenagers or senile old gits, who start up >>>>>>>>> snarky sexual innuendo. They're not even very good at it. >>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>> See the same thing in s.e.b. >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>> Designed any "cute" circuits lately ?:-) >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>> ...Jim Thompson >>>>>>> >>>>>>> https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Optos/D140_and_Fixture.jpg >>>>>>> >>>>>>> The big board is the test fixture. The little board (I think 0.75x2" >>>>>>> qualifies as "cute") is a 150+ amp, 4ish kilowatt precision laser >>>>>>> driver, with onboard boost-doubler converter. The one that you didn't >>>>>>> like. >>>>>>> >>>>>>> https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Optos/D140_200A_Pulse.JPG >>>>>>> >>>>>>> The Brat did beautiful PCB layouts on these. They both worked first >>>>>>> time. The customer connected +10 to the 5 volt supply and blew up the >>>>>>> first one that we shipped, but these things happen. >>>>>>> >>>>>>> Currently I'm working on an active magnetic field shield, an aircraft >>>>>>> engine transducer simulator, some thermal stuff for an EUV photodiode >>>>>>> digitizer, and some optical stuff having to do with semiconductor fab. >>>>>>> And still tweaking my shrimp-and-grits and bread pudding recipes. >>>>>>> >>>>>>> How about you? Still working? >>>>>> >>>>>> Yep. Still cranking out custom chips. >>>>>> >>>>>> Will you show us the final schematic of the boost-doubler? As >>>>>> originally posted it _did_ have problems. >>>>>> >>>>>> ...Jim Thompson >>>>> >>>>> What problems? >>>>> >>>>> This is essentially the same as the "bubbler" circuit I posted >>>>> previously. Here's the (censored) schematic of the real thing: >>>>> >>>>> https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Circuits/Power/Boost-Doubler.pdf >>>>> >>>>> It's tiny and it works great. It's simple, efficient, and very >>>>> tunable. The current pulled from the customer's supply, during >>>>> chargeup or recharge, is nearly flat and is easily settable. >>>> >>>> Bwahahahahahaha! What did I expect ?>:-} >>>> >>>> ...Jim Thompson >>> >>> I expect to sell several thousand of them. >> >> How much crap you sell is immaterial. >> >> You're supposed to "educate" us. Bwahahahahahahahaha! >> >> ...Jim Thompson > >No, I believe his mandate actually is "to sell stuff and make money". >Educating us is a sideline, and I would be surprised if your priorities >were any different.
I don't expect anybody here to buy anything, and I give a lot away, for free. Besides, selling stuff and making money are just side effects of designing cool electronics. Very few people here post schematics of actual stuff that they have designed recently. I suppose most people aren't allowed. -- John Larkin Highland Technology Inc www.highlandtechnology.com jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com Precision electronic instrumentation Picosecond-resolution Digital Delay and Pulse generators Custom timing and laser controllers Photonics and fiberoptic TTL data links VME analog, thermocouple, LVDT, synchro, tachometer Multichannel arbitrary waveform generators
John Larkin <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> writes:

[...]

>>>>>> What problems? >>>>>> >>>>>> This is essentially the same as the "bubbler" circuit I posted >>>>>> previously. Here's the (censored) schematic of the real thing: >>>>>> >>>>>> https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Circuits/Power/Boost-Doubler.pdf >>>>>> >>>>>> It's tiny and it works great. It's simple, efficient, and very >>>>>> tunable. The current pulled from the customer's supply, during >>>>>> chargeup or recharge, is nearly flat and is easily settable.
[...]
> > I don't expect anybody here to buy anything, and I give a lot away, for free. > Besides, selling stuff and making money are just side effects of designing cool > electronics. > > Very few people here post schematics of actual stuff that they have designed > recently. I suppose most people aren't allowed.
Must be a small set of people here who - design interesting stuff - are not afraid of ridicule, potentially making their mistakes public - have the inclination and authority to publish their designs in the first place (in the case of professionals) I like the D4 LED driver. -- John Devereux
On Saturday, 7 September 2013 18:40:26 UTC+10, John Devereux  wrote:
> John Larkin <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> writes:
<snip>
> > Very few people here post schematics of actual stuff that they have des=
igned
> > recently. I suppose most people aren't allowed.
And those that are might be more inclined to post the schematic in a higher= prestige forum. Sloman A.W., Buggs P., Molloy J., and Stewart D. =93A microcontroller-based= driver to stabilise the temperature of an optical stage to 1mK in the rang= e 4C to 38C, using a Peltier heat pump and a thermistor sensor=94 Measureme= nt Science and Technology, 7 1653-64 (1996). Sloman, A.W. and Swords, M.D. "A fast and economical gated discriminator", = Journal of Physics E: Scientific Instruments, 11, 521-524 (1978). Ghiggino, K.P., Phillips, D., and Sloman, A.W. "Nanosecond pulse stretcher"= ,Journal of Physics E: Scientific Instruments, 12, 686-687 (1979). It takes work to describe the schematic and set it in context. John Larkin = posts pencil sketches, which takes less effort. As I've mentioned here before, I've now got what I find to be an interestin= g schematic of a low-distortion sine-wave oscillator, which I still haven't= got around to testing as a working circuit, despite having spent quite a b= it on buying all the parts for it. If I posted it here, the sort of journal that might publish it could object= that it had already been posted here and knock it back. The Review Scienti= fic Instruments wasn't too fussed a year or so ago when I'd posted the cont= ent of a comment of one their papers here before I submitted it for peer-re= viewed publication. Sloman A. W. =93Comment on =91A versatile thermoelectric temperature contro= ller with 10 mK reproducibility and 100 mK absolute accuracy=92 [Rev. Sci. = Instrum. 80, 126107 (2009)] =93, Review of Scientific Instruments 82, 27101= - 027101-2 (2011). but that wasn't about self-advertisement - aka helping to move the field fo= rward - as it was about giggling at a drop-off. <snip> --=20 Bill Sloman, Sydney
On 9/7/2013 4:58 AM, Bill Sloman wrote:
> On Saturday, 7 September 2013 18:40:26 UTC+10, John Devereux wrote: >> John Larkin <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> writes: > > <snip> > >>> Very few people here post schematics of actual stuff that they >>> have designed recently. I suppose most people aren't allowed. > > And those that are might be more inclined to post the schematic in a > higher prestige forum. >
<snip> Judging from what I hear from colleagues both academic and industrial, it's not at all clear that RSI and JoP E are "higher prestige." In academic circles, instruments papers are very much the poor relative, whereas here you can see the "peer review" process in action. (Open-source software has raised the bar on peer review for everybody. IME professional journals are far behind.) Certainly I get a lot more consulting inquiries that cite SED than cite about 80% of my publications. Anyway, if it's a question of doing good work and making a contribution, who cares about _prestige_? Does anybody really get up in the morning and go off to the lab for _prestige_? Life is a lot better when one isn't looking at oneself all the time. You get a lot more done, and have a much better time. In the immortal words of your far-famed fellow-traveller Andrei Gromyko, "My personal life doesn't interest me." ;) Cheers Phil Hobbs -- Dr Philip C D Hobbs Principal Consultant ElectroOptical Innovations LLC Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics 160 North State Road #203 Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 USA +1 845 480 2058 hobbs at electrooptical dot net http://electrooptical.net
On Sat, 07 Sep 2013 09:40:26 +0100, John Devereux <john@devereux.me.uk> wrote:

>John Larkin <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> writes: > >[...] > >>>>>>> What problems? >>>>>>> >>>>>>> This is essentially the same as the "bubbler" circuit I posted >>>>>>> previously. Here's the (censored) schematic of the real thing: >>>>>>> >>>>>>> https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Circuits/Power/Boost-Doubler.pdf >>>>>>> >>>>>>> It's tiny and it works great. It's simple, efficient, and very >>>>>>> tunable. The current pulled from the customer's supply, during >>>>>>> chargeup or recharge, is nearly flat and is easily settable. > >[...] > >> >> I don't expect anybody here to buy anything, and I give a lot away, for free. >> Besides, selling stuff and making money are just side effects of designing cool >> electronics. >> >> Very few people here post schematics of actual stuff that they have designed >> recently. I suppose most people aren't allowed. > >Must be a small set of people here who > >- design interesting stuff > >- are not afraid of ridicule, potentially making their mistakes public > >- have the inclination and authority to publish their designs in the > first place (in the case of professionals)
Most people won't even post a pic or a link to a product that they designed, even when those things are public, on web sites.
> >I like the D4 LED driver.
I'm a fan of brainstorming, part of which consists of presenting, to a professional audience, half-baked, defective, and downright goofy ideas. In the right environment, some of those ideas, even ones that are plainly wrong, can shake things up and evolve into new, useful stuff. We've developed a lot of cool circuits and products through that process. Most people can't play the game, because they can't stand to be seen as "wrong" or because they are locked into accepted practices sanctioned by authority. Or because they have no ideas, or are insecure. Some people in this ng are outraged by posts that are not fully worked out circuits, with parts values, that are ready for them to simulate or use. Too bad. -- John Larkin Highland Technology Inc www.highlandtechnology.com jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com Precision electronic instrumentation Picosecond-resolution Digital Delay and Pulse generators Custom timing and laser controllers Photonics and fiberoptic TTL data links VME analog, thermocouple, LVDT, synchro, tachometer Multichannel arbitrary waveform generators
On Fri, 06 Sep 2013 19:23:22 -0700, John Larkin
<jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote:

[snip]
> >Very few people here post schematics of actual stuff that they have designed >recently. I suppose most people aren't allowed.
My chip design customers are almost always on the leading edge of their particular technology. As such, publishing the design I did for them would divulge their proprietary information to competitors; and, of course, I am bound by NDA's to keep that information confidential. But here is an eleven year old design that can now be freely published... typical of my designs in an advanced BiCMOS technology... <http://www.analog-innovations.com/SED/Sample_Custom_Analog_Mixed-Signal_Chip_Design_by_Analog_Innovations.pdf> As you can see, I don't deal in the simple stuff >:-} ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson | mens | | Analog Innovations | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | San Tan Valley, AZ 85142 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
On Sat, 07 Sep 2013 12:39:18 -0400, Phil Hobbs
<pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

>On 9/7/2013 4:58 AM, Bill Sloman wrote: >> On Saturday, 7 September 2013 18:40:26 UTC+10, John Devereux wrote: >>> John Larkin <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> writes: >> >> <snip> >> >>>> Very few people here post schematics of actual stuff that they >>>> have designed recently. I suppose most people aren't allowed. >> >> And those that are might be more inclined to post the schematic in a >> higher prestige forum. >> ><snip> > >Judging from what I hear from colleagues both academic and industrial, >it's not at all clear that RSI and JoP E are "higher prestige." In >academic circles, instruments papers are very much the poor relative, >whereas here you can see the "peer review" process in action. >(Open-source software has raised the bar on peer review for everybody. >IME professional journals are far behind.) > >Certainly I get a lot more consulting inquiries that cite SED than cite >about 80% of my publications. Anyway, if it's a question of doing good >work and making a contribution, who cares about _prestige_? Does >anybody really get up in the morning and go off to the lab for >_prestige_? Life is a lot better when one isn't looking at oneself all >the time. You get a lot more done, and have a much better time. > >In the immortal words of your far-famed fellow-traveller Andrei Gromyko, >"My personal life doesn't interest me." ;) > >Cheers > >Phil Hobbs
Making things that actually work is more fun. I published a couple of papers in the late '60's and early '70's... (1) Never made me any particularly notable amount of money. (2) The glazed look of the audience, who were completely lost, was annoying... why bother trying to educate the plebes >:-} ...Jim Thompson -- | James E.Thompson | mens | | Analog Innovations | et | | Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus | | San Tan Valley, AZ 85142 Skype: Contacts Only | | | Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat | | E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 | I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.
On Sunday, 8 September 2013 02:39:18 UTC+10, Phil Hobbs  wrote:
> On 9/7/2013 4:58 AM, Bill Sloman wrote:=20 > > On Saturday, 7 September 2013 18:40:26 UTC+10, John Devereux wrote:=20 > >> John Larkin <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> writes:=20 > >=20 > > <snip>=20 > >=20 > >>> Very few people here post schematics of actual stuff that they=20 > >>> have designed recently. I suppose most people aren't allowed.=20 > >=20 > > And those that are might be more inclined to post the schematic in a > > higher prestige forum. > >=20 > <snip> =20 >=20 > Judging from what I hear from colleagues both academic and industrial, =
=20
> it's not at all clear that RSI and JoP E are "higher prestige." In=20 > academic circles, instruments papers are very much the poor relative,=20 > whereas here you can see the "peer review" process in action.=20
The peer review process consists of asking for an opinion from people who a= re known to know what they are talking about, and interested enough to be w= illing to go to the trouble of writing such an opinion. What we get here are opinions from everybody who is motivated to comment. S= ome of them know what they are talking about. It's not quite the same.=20 =20
> (Open-source software has raised the bar on peer review for everybody.=20 > IME professional journals are far behind.)
For a long time the Review of Scientific Instruments didn't have a pool of = referees who knew anything about electronics, and they published some total= nonsense. Sloman A. W. =93Comment on =91A versatile thermoelectric temperature contro= ller with 10 mK reproducibility and 100 mK absolute accuracy=92 [Rev. Sci. = Instrum. 80, 126107 (2009)] =93, Review of Scientific Instruments 82, 27101= - 027101-2 (2011). is a fair example. I don't know JoP E - unless it is what used to be the Br= itish "Journal of Scientific Instruments" which metamorphosed through Journ= al of Physics E: Scientific Instruments" to "Measurement Science and Techno= logy" which is where I've published most of my stuff. They do have access t= o referees who know electronics - I've refereed for them from time to time,= but not that often.
> Certainly I get a lot more consulting inquiries that cite SED than cite =
=20
> about 80% of my publications.
Good to hear. I had that in mind when I started posting here in 1996, but d= idn't get anything like enough business out of it to justify giving up the = day job.
> Anyway, if it's a question of doing good =20 > work and making a contribution, who cares about _prestige_?=20
More people read "high prestige" journals, and cite the articles they find.= That's what defines a high prestige journal.
> Does =20 > anybody really get up in the morning and go off to the lab for =20 > _prestige_? Life is a lot better when one isn't looking at oneself all =
=20
> the time. You get a lot more done, and have a much better time.
Too true. But once you've done the work, you owe it to the field to write i= t up and publish it, and reputation, as well as academic appointments and p= romotion do tend to be influenced by the number of papers that you've publi= shed, and how often they get cited. My wife has fairly impressive list of publications, and she worries if her = graduate students and post-docs aren't getting enough publications into the= right journals. =20
> In the immortal words of your far-famed fellow-traveller Andrei Gromyko, =
=20
> "My personal life doesn't interest me." ;)
Gromyko was famous for his "complete identification with the interest of th= e state and his faithful service to it". His is probably an extreme positio= n. And do note that I'm a socialist, not a communist - if you were as well edu= cated about politics as you are about physics, you'd be aware that socialis= ts believe in democracy, and communists favour oligarchy. Since the US is c= urrently more like an oligarchy of the wealthy than a democracy, this disti= nction may escape you, but it shouldn't. People who have less important jobs than Gromyko had probably need to worry= more about their personal life, at least to the extent that that they both= er to get out of bed in the morning and eat enough to maintain their weight= at a body mass index of over 20. --=20 Bill Sloman, Sydney
On Sunday, 8 September 2013 03:00:53 UTC+10, Jim Thompson  wrote:
> On Sat, 07 Sep 2013 12:39:18 -0400, Phil Hobbs > <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote: > >On 9/7/2013 4:58 AM, Bill Sloman wrote: > >> On Saturday, 7 September 2013 18:40:26 UTC+10, John Devereux wrote: > >>> John Larkin <jjlarkin@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> writes:
<snip>
> Making things that actually work is more fun.
Much more fun.
> I published a couple of papers in the late '60's and early '70's... > > (1) Never made me any particularly notable amount of money.
That's not the point. Good papers are supposed to attract the attention of people who may hire you to carry out more fun work. The money follows the work, not the papers.
> (2) The glazed look of the audience, who were completely lost, was > annoying... why bother trying to educate the plebes >:-}
You need to work out how to dumb down the story to a level that the audience can follow. In industry this is called telling management the story in a form that they can makes sense of. It's definitely a skill that any good engineer needs to cultivate. Some audiences can't follow calculus, which can be a nuisance. -- Bill Sloman, Sydney