Forums

I2C devices with unique identifiers.

Started by Roberto Waltman August 10, 2012
For a project I am working on, I would like to give boards fresh from
manufacturing a distinct "identity", before they are assigned a serial
number, or have a MAC address or IP address programmed, etc.

This could be provided by some devices, such as Maxim's DS2411
"Silicon serial number" ( with a "Unique, Factory-Lasered and Tested
64-Bit Registration Number" ) or DS18B20 temperature sensor, ( "has a
Unique 64-Bit Serial Code Stored in an On-Board ROM" )

Looking for the least expensive chip with such an ID, with an I2C
(preferred), SPI or 1-wire interface. Don't care what other
functionality that chip may have, I just want the unique ID.
A device that report its own serial number would be OK.

Any recommendations?

Thanks,
--
Roberto Waltman

[ Please reply to the group,
  return address is invalid ]
On Fri, 10 Aug 2012 13:47:30 -0400, Roberto Waltman wrote:

> For a project I am working on, I would like to give boards fresh from > manufacturing a distinct "identity", before they are assigned a serial > number, or have a MAC address or IP address programmed, etc. > > This could be provided by some devices, such as Maxim's DS2411 "Silicon > serial number" ( with a "Unique, Factory-Lasered and Tested 64-Bit > Registration Number" ) or DS18B20 temperature sensor, ( "has a Unique > 64-Bit Serial Code Stored in an On-Board ROM" ) > > Looking for the least expensive chip with such an ID, with an I2C > (preferred), SPI or 1-wire interface. Don't care what other > functionality that chip may have, I just want the unique ID. A device > that report its own serial number would be OK. > > Any recommendations? > > Thanks,
I use the Microchip 25AA02E48 in several products. It's SPI but the 24AA025E48 is I2C. They will run you about $0.23 in a SOT-23 package. Get them from Mouser,Digikey,Avnet or direct from Microchip. Good news is you also get some EEPROM along with the MAC address. -- Chisolm Republic of Texas
Joe Chisolm wrote:
>> Looking for the least expensive chip with such an ID,
>I use the Microchip 25AA02E48 in several products.
Thanks, that's exactly what I need. -- Roberto Waltman [ Please reply to the group, return address is invalid ]
On 8/10/2012 5:36 PM, Roberto Waltman wrote:
> Joe Chisolm wrote: >>> Looking for the least expensive chip with such an ID, > >> I use the Microchip 25AA02E48 in several products. > > Thanks, that's exactly what I need. > -- > Roberto Waltman
Dallas did a good job with the one wire parts in general and only using one wire is a great thing. But they don't seem to be price competitive for who knows what reason. I seem to recall the one wire part that is the least expensive is one of their eeproms. I'm pretty sure it is lot more than a quarter. Heck, sometimes it is cheaper to emulate a one wire part with an MCU, but then you have to do your own serial number programming! Rick
rickman <gnuarm@gmail.com> wrote:

>On 8/10/2012 5:36 PM, Roberto Waltman wrote: >> Joe Chisolm wrote: >>>> Looking for the least expensive chip with such an ID, >> >>> I use the Microchip 25AA02E48 in several products. >> >> Thanks, that's exactly what I need. >> -- >> Roberto Waltman > >Dallas did a good job with the one wire parts in general and only using >one wire is a great thing. But they don't seem to be price competitive >for who knows what reason. I seem to recall the one wire part that is >the least expensive is one of their eeproms. I'm pretty sure it is lot >more than a quarter. Heck, sometimes it is cheaper to emulate a one >wire part with an MCU, but then you have to do your own serial number >programming!
Nowadays a lot of MCUs come with a unique serial number. -- Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply indicates you are not using the right tools... nico@nctdevpuntnl (punt=.) --------------------------------------------------------------
Nico Coesel wrote:
>Nowadays a lot of MCUs come with a unique serial number.
I know of a few, such as NXP's LPC1311. But the processor in this project does not have this feature. (Can not change that) -- Roberto Waltman [ Please reply to the group, return address is invalid ]
> For a project I am working on, I would like to give boards fresh from > manufacturing a distinct "identity", before they are assigned a serial > number, or have a MAC address or IP address programmed, etc.
Does the board have a flash? Then maybe you already have a 64-bit unique ID available. Leo Havm&#2013266168;ller.
Leo Havm&#2013266168;ller wrote:
>Does the board have a flash? Then maybe you already have a 64-bit unique ID >available.
Thanks, I am aware of those and no, the only flash is the CPU's internal memory. -- Roberto Waltman [ Please reply to the group, return address is invalid ]
In article <TsOdnZ0rq-7G-LjNnZ2dnUVZ_rSdnZ2d@earthlink.com>, jchisolm6
@earthlink.net says...
> On Fri, 10 Aug 2012 13:47:30 -0400, Roberto Waltman wrote: > > > For a project I am working on, I would like to give boards fresh from > > manufacturing a distinct "identity", before they are assigned a serial > > number, or have a MAC address or IP address programmed, etc. > > > > This could be provided by some devices, such as Maxim's DS2411 "Silicon > > serial number" ( with a "Unique, Factory-Lasered and Tested 64-Bit > > Registration Number" ) or DS18B20 temperature sensor, ( "has a Unique > > 64-Bit Serial Code Stored in an On-Board ROM" ) > > > > Looking for the least expensive chip with such an ID, with an I2C > > (preferred), SPI or 1-wire interface. Don't care what other > > functionality that chip may have, I just want the unique ID. A device > > that report its own serial number would be OK. > > > > Any recommendations? > > > > Thanks, > > I use the Microchip 25AA02E48 in several products. It's SPI but the > 24AA025E48 is I2C. They will run you about $0.23 in a SOT-23 > package. Get them from Mouser,Digikey,Avnet or direct from Microchip. > Good news is you also get some EEPROM along with the MAC address. > >
I second the recommendation, I use both flavors of these guys a regular basis. As easy to use as any serial EEPROM and cheap.
In comp.arch.embedded Roberto Waltman <usenet@rwaltman.com> wrote:

> For a project I am working on, I would like to give boards fresh from > manufacturing a distinct "identity", before they are assigned a serial > number, or have a MAC address or IP address programmed, etc.
> This could be provided by some devices, such as Maxim's DS2411 > "Silicon serial number" ( with a "Unique, Factory-Lasered and Tested > 64-Bit Registration Number" ) or DS18B20 temperature sensor, ( "has a > Unique 64-Bit Serial Code Stored in an On-Board ROM" )
> Looking for the least expensive chip with such an ID, with an I2C > (preferred), SPI or 1-wire interface. Don't care what other > functionality that chip may have, I just want the unique ID. > A device that report its own serial number would be OK.
> Any recommendations?
How about using a uC with built-in unique ID? E.g. STM32F? Bye -- Uwe Bonnes bon@elektron.ikp.physik.tu-darmstadt.de Institut fuer Kernphysik Schlossgartenstrasse 9 64289 Darmstadt --------- Tel. 06151 162516 -------- Fax. 06151 164321 ----------